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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 5 3 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 5 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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on, and was prompted by an ardent and enterprising temper to more active operations. In the centre of a hostile population, and of a poor, mountainous country, he was urged both by the want of supplies and the necessity for vigilance to send out frequent expeditions. One of these brought on the first hostile collision in Kentucky. General Zollicoffer sent out Colonel J. A. Battle, who, with about 800 men, on the 17th of September, attacked and dispersed a camp of 300 Home Guards at Barboursville, eighteen miles distant from the position of the main body of the Confederates. The Confederates lost two killed and three wounded, and reported the known loss of the enemy as twelve killed and two prisoners. Having captured twenty fire-arms, and destroyed Camp Andrew Johnson, they returned to Cumberland Ford. On September 26th an expedition, sent by Zollicoffer to get salt, broke up a large encampment at Laurel Bridge, capturing its baggage, a few prisoners, 8,000 rounds of ammunit
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Holding Kentucky for the Union. (search)
cky. By September 1st, there had gathered at this point four full Kentucky regiments and nearly two thousand East Tennesseeans, who had been enlisted by Lieutenant S. P. Carter. This officer, like Nelson, belonging to the navy, was a native of East Tennessee, and it was part of the original plan of the East Tennessee expedition that he should enter that section and organize men to receive the arms that Nelson was to bring. This was found to be impracticable, and he opened his camp at Barboursville and the men began to come to him. In August, W. T. Ward, a prominent lawyer of Greensburg, commenced recruiting a brigade and soon had twenty-two companies pledged to rendezvous when he should obtain the necessary authority from Washington. In Christian county, Colonel J. F. Buckner, a wealthy lawyer and planter, recruited a regiment from companies which organized originally as Home Guards, but soon determined to enter the volunteer service. He established a camp five miles north o
. Large supplies of army stores have been transported to the rebels' lines by this route. The necessary measures have been taken to stop the traffic.--A regiment has just passed down Pennsylvania avenue, headed by a soldier who lost a leg at the battle of Stone Bridge. He carried his musket strapped to his back. The spectacle excited the greatest enthusiasm among our citizens. The new gunboat Sagamore was launched to-day from Sampson's yard, East Boston, Mass. Her keel was laid sixty days ago.--N. Y. Herald, Sept. 19. Yesterday a skirmish took place between the Home Guard and some of Gen. Zollicoffer's men at Barboursville, Ky., without resulting in any damage. It was resumed to-day, when seven rebels and one of their horses were killed. One of the Home Guards received six wounds, and another was taken prisoner. The Home Guards numbered thirty-seven, and the rebels three hundred.--Two miles of the Covington and Lexington Railroad were torn up yesterday near Cyantheana.
don his horse, and go on foot through the by-paths, or fight. Returning to Boston, he gathered together twenty-two Home Guards, fourteen of whom remained steadfast to their purpose; and creeping up the mountain gorge at midnight, they shot the sentinel, alarmed the rebels, who tumbled out of the house and sprang to their saddles, eight of which were emptied in a moment, and with three of their horses the Adjutant galloped off, bringing them safe into camp.--Cincinnati Gazette. Barboursville, Kentucky, was taken possession of by a picket of the Federal army, amounting to fifteen hundred men. They entered the town in the evening, and hoisted the Stars and Stripes without opposition.--Cincinnati Times, November 12. The expedition, under Col. Dodge, which left Rolla, Missouri, in quest of ex-Judge Freeman's band of marauding rebels, took possession of Houston, Texas County, and captured a large amount of rebel property and several prominent secessionists, including some officer
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
lle. General C. L. Stevenson, with nearly nine thousand men, was ordered to watch the Federal General G. W. Morgan, who occupied Cumberland Gap. General Smith started on the 14th en route to Rogers's Gap, with 4 brigades, 6000 strong. The brigades of Preston Smith and B. J. Hill were commanded by General P. R. Cleburne, and the brigades of McCray and McNair were under command of General T. J. Churchill. General Henry Heth, with a force nearly 4000 strong, was ordered to march direct to Barboursville by way of Big Creek Gap, and the army was preceded by 900 cavalry under Colonel John S. Scott. General Smith had at first contemplated cutting off the supplies of the garrison at Cumberland Gap, but learning that they were well provisioned, and seeing the difficulty of supplying his own troops in the poor and barren region of south-eastern Kentucky, he determined to push rapidly on to the rich blue-grass country in the central part of the State. This determination had been communicated
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
ay out on either side, Morgan, upon the exhaustion of his supplies, would be compelled to surrender. This plan being adopted, Smith commenced his movement through Rogers's and Big Creek Gaps on the 14th of August, and reached Morgan's rear at Barbourville on the 18th. He now perceived that it would be impossible for him to gather supplies for his command from that poor and exhausted region, and later his embarrassment was increased by Morgan's occupation of Rogers's and Big Creek Gaps. Nothr generosity can anywhere be found than that wherein, at the close of the conflict,, she restored to all the rights of citizenship and the ties of fraternity her expatriated sons who for four years had made war upon her. Smith advanced from Barbourville with 12,000 men on the 26th of August, encountered at Rogersville and Richmond the 5000 or 6000 raw troops assembled there, scattered them like chaff, making prisoners and capturing arms, proceeded to Lexington, where he established his headqu
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 3: military operations in Missouri and Kentucky. (search)
sisters. With the old plea of the unrighteous, that the end justifies the means, he declared that he felt a religious respect for Kentucky's neutrality, and would continue to feel it, so long as the safety of the Confederate cause would permit. He issued an order at the same time, setting forth that he entered Kentucky to defend the soil of a sister State against an invading foe. and in supporting Buckner in his treasonable operations in his native State. Zollicoffer had advanced to Barboursville, the capital of Knox County, so early as the 19th of September, where he dispersed an armed band of Kentucky Unionists, and captured their camp. He proclaimed peace and security in person and property for all Kentuckians, excepting those who should be found in arms for the Union; but his soldiers could not be restrained, and the inhabitants oiomf that region were mercilessly plundered by them. Zollicoffer's invasion aroused the Unionists of Eastern Kentucky, and they flew to arms. A
this morning, and Carter's will close up the rear to-morrow. It has become necessary to station the Forty-ninth Indiana, with the two pieces of artillery, at Barboursville. On yesterday a spy, pretending to be a deserter, was brought into camp. He left Cumberland Gap on the day before yesterday at 2 o'clock a. m. He reports theed. The loyal citizens of Clinton are almost in despair, &c. G. H. McKINNEY. My command, already reduced by sending the Forty-ninth Indiana Regiment to Barboursville, is too small to afford succor to Somerset. Assistant Quartermaster McKinney belongs to my division, and I have ordered him to supply the Home Guard with armsy the balance of the stores on the approach of the enemy. Duplicate sent to General Buell. George W. Morgan. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Barboursville, Ky., June 9, 1862. Many thanks for Baird and Medary. Both have arrived. My advance guard is at Lambdin's, within 18 miles of Speedwell where the column wil
e slackened; but I think it due to myself and proper that these facts should be presented to you. The information here is that Cumberland Gap is threatened by five or six regiments and twelve pieces of artillery between Cumberland Ford and Barboursville. Two regiments are on the Cumberland River in Kentucky between Somerset and Burkesville. Generals Thomas and Schoepf with their commands have joined Buell. All the efforts of the enemy will, I think, be directed toward the Mississippi, and. Brig. Gen. S. M. Barton, Commanding Fourth Brigade: General: The major-general commanding directs me to say that he has information that the enemy are engaged in repairing a road on their line of communication between Cumberland Ford and Barboursville. This gave rise to the report (communicated to you) that they were constructing a road to turn our position at Cumberland Gap. Nevertheless the general considers it proper that you should satisfy yourself (if necessary, in the manner propos
e invading the State, shall be incapable of inheriting any property in Kentucky, unless he shall return to his allegiance within sixty days; and, on the next day, the House Judiciary Committee, having reported that, in its judgment, Congress had not transcended its powers in imposing taxes for the preservation of the Union, was discharged from further consideration of the subject by a vote of 67 to 13; and the Senate concurred without a division. On the 16th, Zollicoffer advanced to Barboursville, Ky., capturing the camp of a regiment of Kentucky Unionists, who fled at his approach. The changed attitude and determined purpose of Kentucky encouraged the Federal Government to take some decided steps in defense of its own existence. Ex-Gov. Morehead, Charles S. Morehead, formerly a Whig representative in Congress from the Lexington district, afterward American Governor of the State from 1855 to 1859, was originally a Unionist of the Henry Clay school; but, having become largely in
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