hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 24, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 12 results in 7 document sections:

Owing to the distance which the Iroquois was obliged to keep from the shore, and to the fact that the bay is fifteen miles wide, the Sumter was enabled to escape. The Iroquois followed on her track, but to no purpose, and the chase was abandoned.--(Doc. 214.) The Louisville Journal of this day contains the following: On the 22d ult., a party of Home Guards from Edmondson and Grayson Counties, numbering one hundred men, advanced across Green River and took possession of the town of Brownsville, Ky., which is on the south side of that stream, and within Buckner's lines,) and hoisted the Federal flag, which had been taken down a short time before by the rebels. The Guards sent out their pickets in the direction of the rebel encampment, whose pickets extended within three miles of town. The Unionists remained in peaceable possession long enough to dine and refresh themselves, when their pickets came in and gave notice of the approach of about two hundred rebel cavalry and infantry,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
, twenty-five miles from Louisville. I therefore pushed forward to Louisville, the leading division arriving there on the 25th, and the last on the 29th. The cavalry was kept as an outpost at Elizabethtown to guard the flank of the passing columns and watch any possible movements of the enemy toward Bowling Green. The large empty wagon train which the exhaustion of our supplies at Nashville had rendered useless and insupportable, had been pushed through from Bowling Green by the way of Brownsville, Litchfield, and West Point, under a cavalry escort. In his official report General Bragg states that he offered battle at Munfordville. No doubt he was willing to fight on his own terms at more than one point. But the general who offers battle is he who stays to give or receive it.--D. C. B. The army was now to encounter grave danger from the influence of Oliver P. Morton, Governor of Indiana. He had from the beginning tried to retain a quasi authority over Indiana troops after
ired in return. With one fire of grape, the whole band of rebels could have been mowed down; but the gallant commanders fled — fled, ay — and when they got to Higginsport, actually hoisted their cannon ashore, and moved off up the river with their boats. Much of our town is destroyed; the loss will reach one hundred thousand dollars. The principal sufferers are Thomas Myers, J. B. Ryan, W. H. Diltz, W. P. Taylor, Mrs. Hooker, S. F. Marshall, V. Weldin, J. T. McKibben, and William Barr. The confederate forces are a battalion of Morgan's. Colonel Bradford, Colonel Harris, and F. L. Cleveland, Esq., are still in the hands of the enemy. On yesterday Colonel Wilson and Colonel Wadsworth, commanding the forces from Maysville and Ripley, pressed on to Brownsville in the effort to overtake the rebels; but were there only in time to fall upon their rear-guard, they having retreated in great haste in the direction of Falmouth. All of which is respectfully submitted, Joseph Donipha
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Kentucky, 1861 (search)
1 wounded. Oct. 31: Skirmish, MorgantownKENTUCKY--Home Guard. Nov. 7-9: Demonstration on Columbus from PaducahILLINOIS--Thielman's Cavalry; Buell's Battery Light Arty.; 9th, 12th and 40th Infantry. INDIANA--23d Infantry. Nov. 8: Engagement, Ivy MountainKENTUCKY--16th Infantry. OHIO--2d and 21st Infantry. Nov. 9: Action, PiketownKENTUCKY--16th Infantry. OHIO--Battery "E," 1st Light Arty.; 2d, 21st, 33d and 59th Infantry. Union loss, 4 killed, 26 wounded. Total, 30. Nov. 20: Skirmish, Brownsville(No Reports.) Nov. 24-Dec. 5: Exp. from Columbus to CaseyvilleMISSOURI--8th Infantry (3 Cos.). Dec. 1-13: Operations about Mill Springs and SomersetINDIANA--33d Infantry. KENTUCKY--12th Infantry. OHIO--17th and 35th Infantry. Dec. 1: Demonstration on Fort HoltILLINOIS--Battery "A," 1st Light Arty. Dec. 1: Skirmish, Whippoorwill CreekKENTUCKY--26th Infantry. Dec. 1-2: Skirmishes, Goggin's CampConfederate reports. Dec. 4-7: Expedition to Bacon Creek BridgeConfederate reports. Dec. 5-8
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Kentucky Volunteers. (search)
1863. Unattached, Hopkinsville, Ky., 1st Division, 23rd Army Corps, to October, 1863. District of South Central Kentucky, 1st Division, 23rd Army Corps, to November, 1863. District of Nashville, Tenn., Dept. of the Cumberland, to April, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to October, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi, to July, 1865. Service. Action at Woodbury, Ky., October 29, 1861. Brownsville, Ky., November 21. Sacramento December 28. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., February 15-March 8, 1862, and to Savannah, Tenn., March 18-April 6. Battle of Shiloh April 6-7. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 12. Buell's Campaign in Northern Alabama and Middle Tennessee June to August. Columbia and Kinderhook August 11 (Detachment). Mount Pleasant August 14. March to Louisville, Ky., in pursuit of Bragg August 21-Sep
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
E5, 149, G8 Brown's Ferry, Tenn. 35, 6; 47, 8; 49, 1, 49, 2; 50, 1; 57, 1; 97, 1; 101, 1; 149, C10 Vicinity of, Oct. 26-29, 1863 50, 1 Brown's Gap, Va. 74, 1; 81, 4; 84, 9; 85, 1, 85, 5, 85, 28; 94, 2; 100, 1; 137, D4 Brownsville, Ark. 47, 1; 135-A; 154, B4; 159, A13 Brownsville, Ky. 118, 1; 150, D7 Brownsville, Md. 27, 3; 74, 1; 100, 1; 116, 2; 136, E6 Brownsville, Miss. 36, 1; 51, 1; 71, 15; 117, 1; 155, C9 Brownsville, Tenn. 117, 1; 135-ABrownsville, Ky. 118, 1; 150, D7 Brownsville, Md. 27, 3; 74, 1; 100, 1; 116, 2; 136, E6 Brownsville, Miss. 36, 1; 51, 1; 71, 15; 117, 1; 155, C9 Brownsville, Tenn. 117, 1; 135-A; 153, H11; 171 Brownsville, Tex. 43, 8; 54, 1; 65, 10; 171 Browntown, Va. 94, 2 Brucetown, Va. 81, 4; 85, 11, 85, 12; 94, 2 Bruin Lake, La. 155, D6 Brunswick, Ga. 117, 1; 135-A; 145, D11; 171 Brunswick, Mo. 135-A; 152, B2; 161, B14 Brunswick River, N. C.: Obstructions, Feb. 7, 1865 68, 7 Brush Mountain, Ga. 43, 4; 49, 4; 59, 3; 60, 1; 88, 2 Buchanan, Va. 81, 6; 135-C, 1; 137, F1 Fort Buchanan, N. C.: Sketch 75, 1 Buckatunna,
Missouri. St. Louis, Jan. 20. --John B. Henderson has been appointed, by Lieut. Gov. Wall, U. S. Senator, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the expulsion of Truston Polk. Mr. Henderson is a Douglas Democrat, and an uncompressing Union man. He was a member of the State Convention, and a Brigadier General in the State service. Late from the Rio Grande — important movement of the Mexicans. The Houston Telegraph, of the 10th, contains the following important item: Our Brownsville correspondent gives unimportant piece of information regarding the movements across the Rio Grande. The sham fight at Matamoras is, of course, unworthy of further attention, but the approach of Vidaurri, with 7,000 men, to make his headquarters at Matamoras, as a representative of the Mexican Federal government, the government that has been making the late treaties with Tom Corwin, that receives a loan of ten millions and protection from the United States, for some purpose or other — we