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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 82 38 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 10 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 4 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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est, and we got scarcely anything; that our forces at Nolin and Dick Robinson were powerless for invasion, and only tempting to a general, such as we believed Sidney Johnston to be; that, if Johnston chose, he could march to Louisville any day. (Page 202.) General Sherman, under the conviction that General Johnston was about to move on him in force, on the 11th of November ordered Thomas to withdraw behind the Kentucky River; and Thomas ordered Schoepf, who was at London, to retire to Crab Orchard. Schoepf fell back, but with such precipitation as to produce all the features and consequences of a rout. The weather was inclement; the roads very bad; and the order of march ill preserved. Tons of ammunition and vast quantities of stores were thrown away. Broken teams and other abandoned property marked the line of retreat. A Federal reporter says: Our march has temporarily disabled the entire brigade, and large numbers will be in hospital in a day or two. So ends the grea
nd that, too, when our troops in force were lying but a few miles in the rear, ready and eager to be led into the engagement. The whole affair is a mystery to me. McCook is, doubtless, to blame for being hasty; but may not Buell be censurable for being slow? And may it not be true that this butchery of men has resulted from the petty jeolousies existing between the commanders of different army corps and divisions? October, 19 Encamped in a broken, hilly field, five miles south of Crab Orchard. From Perryville to this place, there has been each day occasional cannonading; but this morning I have heard no guns. The Cumberland mountains are in sight. We are pushing forward as fast probably as it is possible for a great army to move. Buell is here superintending the movement. October, 24 In the woods near Lebanon, and still without tents. Bragg has left Kentucky, and is thought to be hastening toward Nashville. We shall follow him. Having now twice traveled the road,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Holding Kentucky for the Union. (search)
Jan. 28, 1865. from a daguerreotype taken about 1850. In the interior, a train bearing a company destined for Nelson's camp took aboard at the next county town another company which was bound for Camp Boone. The officers in charge made a treaty by which their men were kept in separate cars. On the day after the August election Nelson's recruits began to gather at his rendezvous. Camp Dick Robinson was situated in a beautiful blue-grass country, near where the pike for Lancaster and Crab Orchard leaves the Lexington and Danville Pike, between Dick's River and the Kentucky. By September 1st, there had gathered at this point four full Kentucky regiments and nearly two thousand East Tennesseeans, who had been enlisted by Lieutenant S. P. Carter. This officer, like Nelson, belonging to the navy, was a native of East Tennessee, and it was part of the original plan of the East Tennessee expedition that he should enter that section and organize men to receive the arms that Nelson was
ughter of Colonel William J. Landram, whose home was in Danville, came running out from his house and planted a small national flag on one of Hescock's guns. The patriotic act was so brave and touching that it thrilled all who witnessed the scene; and until the close of the war, when peace separated the surviving officers and men of the battery, that little flag was protected and cherished as a memento of the Perryville campaign. Pursuit of the enemy was not continued in force beyond Crab Orchard, but some portions of the army kept at Bragg's heels until he crossed the Cumberland River, a part of his troops retiring to Tennessee by way of Cumberland Gap, but the major portion through Somerset. As the retreat of Bragg transferred the theatre of operations back to Tennessee, orders were now issued for a concentration of Buell's army at Bowling Green, with a view to marching it to Nashville, and my division moved to that point without noteworthy incident. I reached Bowling Green w
Chapter XII Moving to Bowling Green James Card, the scout and guide General Sill Colonel Schaefer Colonel G. W. Roberts movement on Murfreesboroa opening of the battle of Stone River. My division had moved from Crab Orchard to Bowling Green by easy marches, reaching this place November 1. General Rosecrans assumed command of the department October 30, at Louisville, and joined the Army November 2. There had been much pressure brought to bear on General Buell to induce him to take measures looking to the occupancy of East Tennessee, and the clamor to this end from Washington still continued; but now that Bragg was south of the Cumberland River, in a position threatening Nashville, which was garrisoned by but a small force, it was apparent to every one at all conversant with the situation that a battle would have to be fought somewhere in Middle Tennessee. So, notwithstanding the pressure from Washington, the army was soon put in motion for Nashville, and when we a
e, Md.--Four hundred and eighty-eight U. S. Artillery and Infantry, commanded by Lieut.-Col. C. S. Merchant; the Sixty-sixty regiment N. Y. S. V. under command of Col. Pinckney; the Fifty-first regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers, and a detachment of five hundred sailors, belonging to the Ellsworth and Naval batteries, commanded by Col. Wainwright, also arrived at Baltimore during the day.--Baltimore American, November 18. The Wild Cat Brigade, under Gen. Schoepf in Kentucky, reached Crab Orchard after a forced marched of four days in retreat.--(Doc. 170.) United States steam gunboat Connecticut captured the British schooner Adelaide, of Nassau, N. P., near Cape Canaveral, and took her into Key West. She was loaded with coffee, lead, and swords, having several cases of the latter. The supercargo, Lieutenant Hardee, a relative of Tactic Hardee, is an officer in the Confederate army. He claimed the cargo as his property, and acknowledged that he was taking it to Savannah, Ga
ladelphia, died in that city this day.--General Michael Corcoran arrived at New York City, and met with a most enthusiastic reception. The Seventeenth regiment of Maine volunteers, commanded by Col. Thomas A. Roberts, passed through New York City en route for the seat of war.--Two bridges on the Marietta and Cincinnati Railroad, east of Loveland, Ohio, were burned, it was supposed, by rebel sympathizers. To-day, and the preceding two days, a series of skirmishes occurred near Crab Orchard, Ky., between the Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry, under the command of Gen. Green Clay Smith, and a rebel cavalry regiment, under Col. Scott, resulting in the defeat and retreat of the latter on each occasion. A force of Gen. Stuart's rebel cavalry made a dash at Catlett's Station, Va., and destroyed or carried off a great quantity of sutler's and other stores, sacked the hospital, captured Gen. Pope's wagons with all his papers, etc., and then proceeded towards Warrenton.--(Doc. 188.)
Union troops under the command of Colonel Stuart, Fifty-fifth Illinois, and a body of guerrillas, who had set fire to the bridge, resulting in a rout of the rebels, with a loss of eight or ten of their number killed.--The Fifteenth regiment of Vermont volunteers, commanded by Colonel Redfield Proctor, passed through Springfield, Mass., on the way to the scene of war.--Springfield Republican. A force of five hundred Union cavalry, under the command of Colonel Edward McCook, left Crab Orchard, Kentucky, this morning, and proceeded toward Point Lick and Big Hill, where they encountered several bands of Morgan's guerrillas and Scott's rebel cavalry, killing four or five of them and capturing their telegraph operator, with his apparatus; also, thirty-three wagons, partly loaded. Thence the Union forces proceeded to Richmond, where they captured two hundred sick and wounded rebels, whom they paroled. The ship Lafayette, of New Haven, Captain Small, from New York for Belfast, with
Doc. 122.-the East-Tennessee campaign. Operations of General Burnside. Major W. H. Church's account. General Burnside left Camp Nelson on the sixteenth of August for East-Tennessee. He left Crab Orchard on the twenty-fourth, having completed his preparations, his columns having been in motion for several days. He reached Mount Vernon, twenty miles distant, on the same day. He left Mount Vernon on the twenty-third, and reached London, twenty-five miles. On the twenty-fourth he reached Williamsburgh, thirty miles from London. On the twenty-fifth he reached Chitwood, Tennessee, twenty-eight miles southwest of Williamsburgh, where he came up with Major-General Hartsuff, commanding the Twenty-third army corps. Major Emory here made a cavalry reconnoissance toward Jacksboro, encountered two regiments of rebel cavalry, and routed them, taking forty-five prisoners. General Burnside, with the main body of his army, left Chitwood on the twenty-eighth and reached Montgomery, the
ides, collected together three hundred and sixty men who had crossed — many without arms, having lost them in the river — and marched out toward Claysville. But before leaving the river, I will briefly recapitulate and sum up in short order the damage to the enemy in this raid, and the sufferings through which General Morgan's command passed. On first crossing the Cumberland, we detached two companies--one to operate on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, the other to operate between Crab Orchard and Somerset, Ky. The first captured two trains, and returned to Tennessee. The second captured thirty-five wagons, and also returned. We then detached a hundred men at Springfield, who marched to Frankfort, and destroyed a train and the railroad near that point. We also captured a train, with a number of officers, on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, near Shepherdsville, sent a detachment around Louisville, who captured a number of army supplies, and effected a crossing by captur
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