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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 82 38 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 10 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 4 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Crab Orchard, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) or search for Crab Orchard, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
eorgetown and Cynthiana, where he had a heavy engagement on the 17th. Thence he returned south via Paris, Winchester, Crab Orchard, Somerset and Sparta, making the great circuit in twenty-five days, capturing many prisoners and destroying much milit destroyed. I arrived at Richmond at 12 o'clock that night and remained until the next afternoon, when I proceeded to Crab Orchard. I had determined to make a stand at Richmond and await reinforcements, as the whole people seemed ready to rise and Colonels Wolford, Metcalfe, Munday and Wynkoop were endeavoring to surround me at this place, so I moved [21st] on to Crab Orchard. There I attached my portable battery to the telegraph leading from Stanford to Louisville and learned the exact posi together with large quantities of shell and ammunition, all of which were destroyed. I also burned at this place and Crab Orchard, 120 government wagons. From Somerset I proceeded to Monticello and from there to a point between Livingston and Spar
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
kinridge with his Kentuckians turned back and sent to Murfreesboro General Buell Congratulated by General Halleck, and directed to take East Tennessee is superseded by General Rosecrans death of General William Nelson condition of Kentucky after evacuation of the State increased Persecution of Southern people. The dispositions for the retreat were soon made, and on the morning of October 13th the movement began, General Polk's and General Hardee's corps moving by way of Lancaster, Crab Orchard and Mount Vernon, and General Smith's column by way of Lancaster and Big Hill to London, where he reunited with General Bragg. The pursuit of General Bragg's column was pressed with vigor by General Buell as far as Mount Vernon; but the retreat was so well covered by Wheeler's cavalry that it was without results. Fortunately General Smith was not vigorously pressed, or he could scarcely have saved his artillery and trains, which were carried over Big Hill only with the greatest difficul