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The Daily Dispatch: January 22, 1864., [Electronic resource], The Federal Spy system in great Britain (search)
system in great Britain We copy the following affidavit from the London Index. It was made by one of the workmen employed by J. & G. Thompson, shipbuilders at Glasgow. It was made in reference to the attempt made by the Yankee spies to suborn them to give evidence that might be used against the steamer Pampero: "On the 17th day of October last Mr. Archibald Brodie, formerly carver and gilder, Buchanan street, Glasgow, called at my house in Govan, proposing to sell carved trusses, &c. On the Tuesday following he called again about the trusses: but before he left he introduced the subject of the steamship Pampero, when he proposed that I should call on their guard against these parties, I did not wait to discuss the matter, but shortly declined the proposals. All which is truth. John Gilchrist. "Ciyde Bank Iron Ship-yard, 30th Nov., 1863. "Deponed before me at Glasgow, thirtieth November, eighteen hundred and sixty-three years. "(Signed,) A. G. Kidston, J. P."
y at the forts around the city of New York, so as to allow the forces now stationed there to be transferred to the field. In the House of Commons on the 8th Layard said that the Government was taking measures to investigate the alleged kidnapping of Irish emigrants into the service of the Federal army. A large company has been formed in England, with a capital of a million of dollars, to purchase steamers to run the blockade and bring out cotton. The steamer Matilda, built at Glasgow for the Confederates, bound from Cardiff for a rebel port, iron and steel clad, was wrecked on Lundy Island. It is reported that the case of the Pampero has been settled, the owners consenting to a verdict for the Crown, with nominal forfeiture of the vessel. Butler demands to be relieved from his present position, or to have entire control of military movements having their base within his department. A great part of the city of Demarara has been destroyed by fire. Loss two
Mr. Long's speech in Glasgow. --The speech of Mr. Long, on the recognition of the South, in the Federal House of Representative on April 7, has been neatly published in pamphlet form by Mr. Anderson Endle, printer, 14 Princes Square Glasgow. By the quantity it is furnished at 33s per first thousand, and 3 s for each additional thousand. Mr. Long's speech in Glasgow. --The speech of Mr. Long, on the recognition of the South, in the Federal House of Representative on April 7, has been neatly published in pamphlet form by Mr. Anderson Endle, printer, 14 Princes Square Glasgow. By the quantity it is furnished at 33s per first thousand, and 3 s for each additional thousand.
r was bonded for $30,000, and they were put on board. She had a valuable cargo besides coal. After leaving her, steered northeast by east. During the night a steamer passes, as supposed by her lights to be a Federal cruiser. We were not seen. August 13th.--It was scarcely daylight before two sail were reported, and in a few moments both were alongside. One was an English vessel, which, of course, we could not touch; the other, the barque Glenavon, of Thomaston, Maine, from Glasgow to New York, with a cargo of pig-iron. This was a fine, new barque, with splendid spars and double topsail yard. The captain had his wife on board,--a brave, good woman,--and a female servant. There were two passengers in the cabin, an old sea captain and his wife, the latter a perfect termagant, and very offensive to all on board. Her tongue was never idle, and her time about equally divided between abusing her husband, who bore it like a lamb, and distributing testaments and tracts am
bly many more will follow suit ere Price can congratulate his followers on their safety. The results of this invasion are fearful, when we count the cost to the Union men of this State, but the damage will ultimately fall on the secessionists. The guerrillas who remain in Missouri are chiefly deserters, principally from the cavalry commands of John B. Clark and Joe Shelby, who are Missourian.--These men tole their officers that they intended to stay in Missouri. After the capture of Glasgow, Clark and Shelby took as many of these men over the river to Price as would go, but not less than three thousand are now in North Missouri, playing guerrilla and cutting up all kinds of mischief More atrocities and outrages following the rebels has been received signed by the as follows: rillas entered the Knowles, were Two Burned is of The the General Hood's miles of Decatur: Hood attacked Decatur yesterday, last night this morning, and was handsomely r
26.40 west from Greenwich. After examining the ship's papers, the captain of the pirate ordered the brig to be sunk, taking out of her everything that could be of any use, such as provisions, canvass and rope, and allowing the ship's company to take away all personal effects, except the nautical instruments. The steamer is a full-rigged ship, with rolling topsails, iron lower masts, bowsprit, steel lower yards, and capable of steaming, under full sail, eleven knots.--She was built at Glasgow, by Messrs. Stevens & Sons, in 1863, and was formerly called the Sea King, and, by the officer's own report, had been employed on the London and Bombay line of steamers. She is now armed with four 68 pounder smooth-bore guns, two 32-pounder rifles, and two 12-pounder smooth-bore guns. She had forty-three men on board, nearly all of whom had joined from captured vessels. She was fitted out at sea, or at Funchal harbor, by another steamer which had been sent out from England for the purpos
t here, and presume the President will state the fact in response to the resolution. Miscellaneous. There is increased activity in the blockade-running business at present, no less than five steamers having been recently launched in the Clyde for that purpose. Furthermore, the rebels are enlisting men and sending them, one by one, to the Rappahannock, now used as a receiving ship and lying at Calais. They despair of getting her out. The iron-ram originally built for the rebels at Glasgow and sold to Denmark has been resold, it is said on good authority, to Spain. --The Danish Government has acted in perfect faith to us in this as in other matters. Lord Lyons, on his return to London, staid for some time at the Norfolk House, St. James Square, the residence of his sister, the Duchess of Norfolk, also the birthplace of George III., of happy memory. He is now at Arundel Castle, one of the abodes of the great ducal family, and convalescing. Among social items of new
The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1865., [Electronic resource], Arrival of a Lot of wheat for the experimental gardens. (search)
Arrival of a Lot of wheat for the experimental gardens. --Commissioner Newton, of the Agricultural Bureau, has just received a large amount of wheat, of different varieties, from Glasgow, to be used in the experimental gardens in Washington.
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