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list is given:— List of missing at Fort Wagner. Co. A. Benton, Andrew, 1st. Sergt. Dugan, George W., Private. Ellis, George J. F., Private. ford, Joseph, Private. garrison, Silas, Private. Jackson, James H., Private. Johnson, Peter B., Private. Lamb, Marshall, Private. Townsend, Ralsey R., Private. waterman, George F., Private. Co. B. Allison, George, Private. Bailey, David, Private. Brooks, John Henry, Private. Brown, Morris, Private. Glasgow, London, Private. Snowdon, John A., Private. walls, Albert, Private. Co. C. Campbell, Joseph R., Private. Hall, Joseph Lee, Private. Halsey, Ira E., Private. Johnson, Samuel, Private. Price, George, Private. Torrence, Abram P., Private. Turner, Treadwell, Private. Co. E. Anderson, William, Private. Harris, Alfred, Private. Lopeman, Charles H., Private. Proctor, Joseph J., Corp. weeks, John, Private. Co. G. Body, Charles, Private. Myer
List of missing at Fort Wagner. Co. A. Benton, Andrew, 1st. Sergt. Dugan, George W., Private. Ellis, George J. F., Private. ford, Joseph, Private. garrison, Silas, Private. Jackson, James H., Private. Johnson, Peter B., Private. Lamb, Marshall, Private. Townsend, Ralsey R., Private. waterman, George F., Private. Co. B. Allison, George, Private. Bailey, David, Private. Brooks, John Henry, Private. Brown, Morris, Private. Glasgow, London, Private. Snowdon, John A., Private. walls, Albert, Private. Co. C. Campbell, Joseph R., Private. Hall, Joseph Lee, Private. Halsey, Ira E., Private. Johnson, Samuel, Private. Price, George, Private. Torrence, Abram P., Private. Turner, Treadwell, Private. Co. E. Anderson, William, Private. Harris, Alfred, Private. Lopeman, Charles H., Private. Proctor, Joseph J., Corp. weeks, John, Private. Co. G. Body, Charles, Private. Myers, William, Private
f Brigadier General Lyon, with instructions to operate against our railroad communications with Louisville. Mc-Cook's division of cavalry was detached on the fourteenth December, and sent to Bowling Green and Franklin, to protect the road. After capturing Hopkinsville, Lyon was met by Lagrange's brigade near Greensburg, and after a sharp fight, was thrown into confusion, losing one gun, some prisoners and wagons; the enemy succeeded, however, by making a wide detour, via Elizabethtown and Glasgow, in reaching the Cumberland river, and crossing at Burkville, from where General Lyon proceeded, via McMinnville and Winchester, Tennessee, to Larkinsville, Alabama, on the Memphis and Charleston railroad, and attacked the little garrison at Scottsboroa on the tenth of January. Lyon was here again repulsed, and his command scattered, our troops pursuing him toward the Tennessee river, which, however, he, with about two hundred of his men and his remaining piece of artillery, succeeded in c
Dred, 266; Sumner's letter on, 268; Georgiana May on, 268; English edition of, 270; presented to Queen Victoria, 271; her interest in, 277, 285; demand for, in Glasgow, 273; Duchess of Sutherland's copy, 276; Low's sales of, 278, 279; London times, on, 278; English reviews on, severe, 279; Revue des Deux Mondes on, 290; Miss Maraskell, Mrs., at home, 312. Geography, school, written by Mrs. Stowe, 65 note, 158. Germany's tribute to Uncle Tom's Cabin, 195. Gladstone, W. E., 233. Glasgow, H. B. S. visits, 210; Antislavery Society of, 174, 189, 213. Glasgow Anti-slavery Society, letter from H. B. S. to, 251. God, H. B. S.'s views of, 39, 42, e, 189, 205; wonderful success of Uncle Tom's Cabin abroad, 189; her warm reception at Liverpool, 207; delight in Scotland, 209; public reception and teaparty at Glasgow, 212; warm welcome from Scotch people, 214; touched by the penny offering of the poor for the slaves, 219; Edinburgh soir4e, 219; meets English celebrities at Lor
to Richmond. his political object in invading Kentucky. his proclamation at Glasgow. surrender of the Federal garrison at Mumfordsville. Bragg's whole army betwheavy demonstration against this position, Bragg's force was thrown rapidly to Glasgow, reaching that point the 13th of September, before any portion of the enemy pating the hopes of the Government there. He telegraphed: My advance will be in Glasgow to-day, and I shall be with them tomorrow; my whole force will be there on the greatest want has been breadstuffs, but we shall be in a plentiful country at Glasgow and beyond. With arms we can, not ,only clear Tennessee and Kentucky, but I c with the larger portion of his army, is concentrating at Bowling Green. From Glasgow we can examine him and decide on the future. Gen. Bragg had a political objbelieved to be the Secession sentiment of the State. From his headquarters at Glasgow he issued a proclamation, informing the people of Kentucky that he had come wi
atment on shipboard, 361; arrives in London, 373; sits in gallery with G., 376, 409; at Crown and Anchor soiree, 384; at Glasgow reception, 399; at Chardon St. Convention, 424. Advertiser (Boston), publishes Otis's letter to Hayne, 1.242; defends 394; journey to Scotland, 395; at teetotal festival, 395-397, at public breakfast, 397; excursion to highlands, 397; in Glasgow, 398; reception, and Chartist encounter, 399-402, sympathy with English suffering, 400, 401, 408; temperance testimonies402; at a juvenile concert, 394; to Scotland with G., 388, 395, at Rechabite festival, 396, at public breakfast, 397, in Glasgow, 398; to Dublin, 402, 403; home voyage, 404-406, reception by colored people, 407, 409, 411; wanted to edit Standard, 3883; burnt at Charleston, 485. Slave trade, foreign, at South, contraband, 1.163; domestic, 164. Smeal, William [d. Glasgow, Aug. 15, 1877, aged 84], attentions to G., 2.398, 402. Smith, Gerrit [b. Utica, N. Y., Mar. 6, 1797; d. New York Cit
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
ht with him a thousand dollars which Lib. 4.59, 63. had been collected for the colored Manual Labor School, while to Mr. Thompson had been entrusted a splendid silver salver, elegant books, and other gifts for Miss Crandall from the ladies of Glasgow and Edinburgh, by whom chiefly his own expenses were borne. Mr. Garrison had procured for both Englishmen the official invitation of the New England and American Anti-Slavery Societies, and had in the opening number of the fourth volume of the amiss. My mind was very tranquil. The meeting was finally held in the lower hall of the Lib. 4.123. Masonic Temple, in spite of direct incitement to violence by the press and by means of placards. In his debate with George Thompson in Glasgow, in June, 1836, Mr. Breckinridge accused Mr. Garrison of having concocted and printed a mobbing placard (Lib. 6.135). Mr. Garrison was present, and, during the slight interruptions which ensued, besought the chairman, Horace Mann, to do Lib.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
from the Brooklyn pulpit, exhibits the growth of his opinions up to the moment when he began to advocate immediate abolition—a moment just before the Emancipation Proclamation itself. In educating public opinion upon slavery, Beecher had been unconsciously preparing his own armament for uses which he could not have guessed. While upon a vacation in England in the autumn of 1863 he was asked to speak on the war, and in the course of eleven days delivered almost impromptu, at Manchester, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Liverpool, and London, the series of addresses which gave him perhaps his greatest celebrity. Some of his audiences, notably those at Liverpool and Glasgow, were most tumultuous, and had actually to be conquered by the speaker. He conquered them, and won over the English middle class to sympathy with the Union cause. The determination of the British government to maintain strict neutrality is said to have been largely due to Beecher's effect upon public opinion. As literatur
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1861. (search)
But here Colonel J. K. Scott, Nineteenth Illinois, replaced Colonel Moore, bringing his own Adjutant; yet Gholson was made Aid-de-Camp and Chief of Staff, October 26th. This change was most grateful, for Gholson had been sadly disappointed in the officers of his regiment (all Germans except his First Lieutenant, Julius Dexter, Class of 1860). In the five days spent at Bowling Green, Buell was relieved by Rosecrans. On the 9th of November the Thirty-Ninth Brigade was ordered alone to Glasgow, Kentucky. From this place Gholson wrote on the 14th, being then the Acting Assistant Adjutant-General to Colonel Scott, Acting Brigadier-General. Thence the brigade advanced to Hartsville, Tennessee; Colonel Scott departed and Colonel Moore resumed command. Owing to some lack of capacity or precaution, the brigade was surprised by a slightly superior force of cavalry and infantry under John Morgan at daylight, Sunday morning, December 7th. Captain Gholson was first on the left, where the O
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, Biographical Index. (search)
thy, Rev., I. 73. Furness, H. H., I. 311. G. Gansevoort, Col., I. 303. Gardner, Francis, II. 43, 208;, 363. Garrison, W. P., II. 159. Gavazzi, Father, II. 45, 46;. Gelray, J. W., Major, II. 137. Gholson, Ann Jane, II. 237. Gholson, S. C., II. 237. Gholson, W. Y., Jr., Capt., Memoir, I. 237-242. Gholson, Thomas, II. 237. Gholson, Thomas, Jr., II. 237. Gibbon, John, Maj.-Gen., I. 92, 430;, 431; H. 100, 428, 454. Gillmore, Q. A., Maj.-Gen., I. 373. Glasgow, Mr., II. 237. Goldsborough, Com. . II. 108, 109;, 110, 254. Goodhue, Clarissa, II. 230. Goodhue, S., II. 230. Goodrich, Allen, I. 126. Goodrich, Charles B., I. 177. Goodrich, J. F., Memoir, I. 126-131. Goodrich, Mary E., I. 126. Goodwin, Lucy C., I. 273. Goodwin, Ozias, I. 273. Goodwin, R. C., Private, Memoir, I. 273, 274;. Also, I. 355; II. 186, 369;. Goodwin, W. W., Prof., II. 304. Gordon, G. H. Maj.-Gen. I. 134, 170;, 257, 258, 260, 263, 269, 273, 315
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