Browsing named entities in Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Hopkinsville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) or search for Hopkinsville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
ng Nashville and passing between him and General Polk, took every precaution to guard against such result. The best engineers had been sent to the narrow strip which separates these two rivers just south of the Tennessee and Kentucky line, and fortifications erected at Fort Henry on the Tennessee and Fort Donelson on the Cumberland rivers. Similar fortifications had been made at Clarksville, Tenn., to which place Gen. Lloyd Tilghman, who had been stationed with a force of observation at Hopkinsville, was assigned. Subsequently he was placed in charge of Fort Henry. But a serious disaster occurred on General Johnston's right flank in the defeat of General Crittenden at Fishing Creek, Pulaski county, Ky., on the 19th of January, 1862. Mill Springs is a small hamlet on the south side of the Cumberland river just above which Fishing Creek, which flows from the north, empties into the Cumberland. On the 17th General Crittenden was occupying Mill Springs with the Seventeenth, Twenty-
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
unted him, and he inspired his men with the magnetism of his own zeal and courage. He was a soldier of conspicuous presence, tall, broad-shouldered, and of strong, handsome features—a man of few words and intense action. He was a citizen of Memphis, and in October, 1861, organized a cavalry regiment of eight companies, aggregating about 650 men. When General Johnston took command at Bowling Green, Forrest at his own request was assigned to duty with General Lloyd Tilghman, in command at Hopkinsville, and picketed and scouted to the front between there and the Ohio river, covering General Johnston's left wing. The Federals maintained a good force at Henderson, Owensboro and other points along the Ohio to Paducah, and frequent skirmishes occurred between detachments of infantry and cavalry from these points and Colonel Forrest's command. The first regular cavalry engagement in Kentucky took place at Sacramento, between a detachment of Forrest's command led by himself, and one from Co