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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, VIII: Emerson's foot-note person, --Alcott (search)
st efforts at Western lectures began in the winter of 1853-54, and he returned in February, 1854. He was to give a series of talks on the representative minds of New England, with the circle of followers surrounding each; the subjects of his discourse being Webster, Greeley, Garrison, Margaret Fuller, Theodore Parker, Greenough, and Emerson; the separate themes being thus stated as seven, and the number of conversations as only six. Terms for the course were three dollars. By his daughter Louisa's testimony he returned late at night with a single dollar in his pocket, this fact being thus explained in his own language : Many promises were not kept and travelling is costly; but I have opened the way, and another year shall do better. Sanborn and Harris's Alcott, 2.477. At any rate, his daughter thus pathetically described his appearance at this interview, as her mother wrote to a friend: He looked as cold and thin as an icicle; but as serene as God. Memoirs, II, 473. There is
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestral (search)
n the ten days Benjamin Marion had wound up his affairs, married his betrothed, Judith Baluet, and was on his way to America to seek his fortune. He bought a plantation on Goose Creek, near Charleston, South Carolina, and here he and his Judith lived for many peaceful years in content and prosperity, seeing their children grow up around them. We have not found the date of his death, but Horry gives the principal features of his will as he got them from the family. He calls Judith Marion Louisa, but that is his picturesque way. She may have been Judith Louisa ! Women's names were not of much consequence in those days. After having, in the good old way, bequeathed his soul to God who gave it, and his body to the earth out of which it was taken, he proceeds:-- In the first place, as to debts, thank God, I owe none, and therefore shall give my executors but little trouble on that score. Secondly,--As to the poor, I have always treated them as my brethren. My dear family
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: little Julia Ward 1819-1835; aet. 1-16 (search)
from bed to bed, announcing himself as a ghost come to haunt them; or, when the three ladies, Mrs. Mills, Mrs. Brown, and Mrs. Francis (otherwise known as Julia, Louisa, and Annie) were playing with their dolls, to whisper in their ears that they must on no account venture near the attic stairs, as an old man in red was sitting til tie is riven, My spirit may ascend to heaven, To dwell with thee, My God. We cannot resist quoting a stanza from the effusion entitled Father's Birthday :--Louisa brings a cushion rare, Anne Eliza a toothpick bright and fair; And O! accept the gift I bring, It is a daughter's offering. Julia's mind was not destined to rMiss Ward (she was always Miss Ward, even in the nursery!) rebuked them for their frivolity; bade them turn their thoughts to graver matters, and write poetry. Louisa refused point-blank, but little Annie, always anxious to please, went dutifully to work, and produced the following lines:--He feeds the ravens when they call, An
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4: girlhood 1839-1843; aet. 20-23 (search)
rs, also, were growing up, each exquisitely attractive in her way: they became known as the Three graces of Bond Street. Louisa was like a damask rose, Annie like a dark lily; dark, too, of eyes and hair were Sam and Marion, while Henry was fair and; her girlhood passed to the sound of sighing. Mfy dear, said an intimate friend of the three, speaking of these days, Louisa had her admirers, and Annie had hers; but when the men saw your mother, they just flopped! Among her papers we have fod are full of affectionate cheerfulness. When Jolie Julie is away on a visit, the others send her a composite letter. Louisa threatens to shut her up on her return with nothing to read but her Anglo-Saxon grammar and Beowulf. ( If that does not glls or theatres. The years of mourning over, the Ward sisters took up the pursuits natural to their age and position. Louisa was now eighteen, very beautiful, already showing the rare social gift which distinguished her through life. The two sis
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 10: the last Roman winter 1897-1898; aet. 78 (search)
A few years after this, the Association which she did so much to found, held the first Woman's Congress ever given in Italy, at the Palace of Justice in Rome. It was an important and admirably conducted convention. The work for the uplift of the sex is going on steadily and well in Italy to-day. May 12. Sat to Villegas all forenoon. Had a little time on the terrace. Thought I would christen it the Praise God. The flowers seem to me to hold their silent high mass, swinging their own censers of sweet incense. Went to Jack's studio and saw his splendid work. Elliott was at work upon his Triumph of Time, a ceiling decoration for the Boston Public Library. In the afternoon went with my brother-in-law to the cemetery to visit dear Louisa's grave. Jack had cut for me many fine roses from the terrace. We dropped many on this dear resting-place of one much and justly beloved. ... Dear old Majesty of Rome, this is my last writing here. I thank God most earnestly for so much.
rge, I, 13. Cram, R. A., II, 156. Cramer, J. B., I, 43. Crawford, Annie, see Rabe. Crawford, Eleanor, II, 389. Crawford, F. Marion, I, 130, 254, 255, 362; II, 28, 31, 65, 69-71, 80, 81, 84, 240, 362, 376, 389. Crawford, Mrs. F. M., II, 240. Crawford, Harold, II, 240. Crawford, Louisa W., I, 18, 19, 30, 34, 35, 58, 59, 70, 78, 79, 95, 103, 115, 118, 130, 134. Letters to, I, 81, 84, 88, 92, 110, 111, 113-17, 119-22, 125-29, 130, 131, 155-59, 168, 170-72, see also Terry, Louisa. Crawford, Thomas, I, 41, 95, 115; II, 55, 389. Crete, I, 260-62, 264, 275-77, 278, 287; II, 43, 44. 225, 394. Crimea, I, 294. Crimean War, II, 189. Critic, N. Y., II, 66. Crothers, S. McC., II, 320. Crusaders, II, 15. Cuba, I, 173, 176, 177, 326. Cuckson, Mr., II, 203. Cumberland Lakes, I, 92. Curiel, Seflor, I, 324. Curtis, G. W., I, 143, 159, 160; II, 93. Letter of, II, 147. Cushing, Mr., II, 74, 75. Cushing, Louisa, I, 227. Cushman, Charlotte,
Esther Peirce, b. 15 Ap. 1789, m. Jonas Gleason 31 Oct. 1805; Jonas, bap. 21 Aug. 1791, d. 22 Oct. 1795; Pamela, b. 25 Feb. 1794; Ephraim Frost, bap. 1 Jan. 1797; Louisa, b. 9 Jan. 1800, d. 14 Jan. 1800; Jonas, b. 17 Aug. 1801, d. 3 Mar. 1840; Albert, b. 4 Jan. 1805; and perhaps others. Jonas the f. d. 29 July 1844; his w. Lydia Walter Russell, b. 22 Feb. 1796; Frederick William, b. 4 July 1798, d. --Nov. 1800; Caroline, b. 13 Mar. 1801, m. Hiram Brooks 20 July 1828, and d. 9 April 1858; Louisa, b. 31 Mar. 1804, d. unm. 3 Ap. 1850. Josiah the f. from an early period in life devoted himself to mercantile pursuits. He resided a few years on Governor's Is and had Olive, b. 6 Dec. 1786, m. Joseph Roby; Sally, b. 15 Sept. 1788, m. Stephen Wheeler, 44 and 2d, Joshua Avery; Sophia, b. 22 Nov. 1790, m. Ezekiel Cutter; Louisa, b. 22 Feb. 1792 or 1793, m. Peleg Bradley; Josiah, b. 8 May 1795; Clarissa, b. 22 June 1797; Edward, b. 22 Nov. 1799; Elmira, b. 28 Dec. 1801; Mary, b. 27 July 1
. 16 Feb. 1800; Esther Peirce, bap. 13 Dec. 1801. James the f. d. 15 Dec. 1823, a. 64. 31. Benjamin, s. of Ammi (20), m. Elizabeth Wyeth 6 Mar. 1785, and d. 7 Mar. 1824; his w. d. 15 Ap. 1842. No children. 32. Jonas, s. of Ammi (20), m. Lydia Frost 19 Oct. 1786, and had Lydia, b. 24 Ap. 1787, m. Nehemiah Mason 16 Oct. 1803; Esther Peirce, b. 15 Ap. 1789, m. Jonas Gleason 31 Oct. 1805; Jonas, bap. 21 Aug. 1791, d. 22 Oct. 1795; Pamela, b. 25 Feb. 1794; Ephraim Frost, bap. 1 Jan. 1797; Louisa, b. 9 Jan. 1800, d. 14 Jan. 1800; Jonas, b. 17 Aug. 1801, d. 3 Mar. 1840; Albert, b. 4 Jan. 1805; and perhaps others. Jonas the f. d. 29 July 1844; his w. Lydia d. 7 Dec. 1858, a. 90. 33. Ephraim, s. of Ammi (20), m. Deborah Locke 13 Mar. 1791, and had Deborah, b. 18 June 1791, d. 7 Sept. 1802; Fanny, b 25 July 1792, d. 26 Sept. 1795; Anna, b. 7 Sept. 1793, m. Jona. Benjamin 8 Sept. 1816, and Peter Tufts of Camb. 17 May 1825; Ephraim, b. 2 Dec. 1794, d. 4 Ap. 1826; Esther Peirce, b. 28
his w. Lydia d. 27 May 1791. 12. Josiah, s. of Josiah (9), m. Lois, dau. of Hubbard Russell, 18 July 1784, and had Anna Livermore, b. 16 Sept. 1784, m. Nathan Fiske 13 July 1805, and d. 12 Sept. 1861; Luke, b. 30 Nov. 1785; Sally Russell, b. 20 Ap. 1789, d. unm. Jan. 1814; Josiah, b. 6 Sept. 1791; James Winthrop, b. 28 Ap. 1794; Walter Russell, b. 22 Feb. 1796; Frederick William, b. 4 July 1798, d. --Nov. 1800; Caroline, b. 13 Mar. 1801, m. Hiram Brooks 20 July 1828, and d. 9 April 1858; Louisa, b. 31 Mar. 1804, d. unm. 3 Ap. 1850. Josiah the f. from an early period in life devoted himself to mercantile pursuits. He resided a few years on Governor's Island, and Boston proper, but soon returned, and res. first near West Boston Bridge, and afterwards at the N. W. corner of Harvard and Moore streets; was Selectman 1808, several years an Overseer of the Poor, and Representative 1807. He d. of paralysis 19 May 1839; his w. Lois d. 17 Ap. 1847, a. 87. 13. John, s. of Josiah (9), se
ronia, bap. 1 Oct. 1797, d. 9 Oct. 1802, and called Miranda in the Record of her death; Elbridge, bap. 26 Dec. 1802; Winslow, bap. 24 Mar. 1805; Miranda, bap. 30 Nov. 1806; Julia Ann, bap. 18 Sept. 1808; Francis Henry, bap. 25 Ap. 1819. Jonathan the f. resided in Menotomy. 27. Josiah, s. of Samuel (19), m. Olive Winship of Lex., and had Olive, b. 6 Dec. 1786, m. Joseph Roby; Sally, b. 15 Sept. 1788, m. Stephen Wheeler, 44 and 2d, Joshua Avery; Sophia, b. 22 Nov. 1790, m. Ezekiel Cutter; Louisa, b. 22 Feb. 1792 or 1793, m. Peleg Bradley; Josiah, b. 8 May 1795; Clarissa, b. 22 June 1797; Edward, b. 22 Nov. 1799; Elmira, b. 28 Dec. 1801; Mary, b. 27 July 1803. Josiah the f. was styled Major, resided in Menotomy, and d. 3 Ap. 1836; his w. Olive d. in May or June 1840, a. 74. 28. Thomas, s. of Thomas (20), m. Sukey (Susanna) Cutter 16 Nov. 1783, and had Sukey, b. 1784, m. Jonathan Butterfield 21 Sept. 1806; Thomas, b. about 1786; Ezekiel, b. 1788; these three bap. together 12 Oct.
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