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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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ll and void by the Military Commandant, Gen. Shepley. A skirmish occurred near Pleasant Hill, Mo., between a company of State militia and a band of rebel guerrillas, resulting in a rout of the rebels, with a loss of six killed and five mortally wounded. A despatch from Gen. McClellan, at Harrison's Landing, on the James River, of this date, said: All quiet. We are rested. Enemy has retreated. By order of President Lincoln, Major-General Henry W. Halleck was this day assigned to the command of the whole land forces of the United States, as General-in-Chief. The rebel Gen. Ruggles refused to grant the petition of the inhabitants of Saint Tammany Parish, La., to permit them to exchange their wood, bricks, lumber, etc., for food, with the citizens of New Orleans.--A skirmish took place near New Hope, Ky., between a body of Union troops, under the command of Lieut.--Col. Moore, and a force of rebel guerrilla cavalry, resulting in the complete rout of the rebels.
icers of his bureau, to impress copper, coal, and such other minerals as may be needed for the use of the government. --A fight occurred near Salem, Miss., between four thousand rebels, under General S. D. Lee, and five thousand Nationals, under McCullis and Phillips, resulting in the defeat of the rebels with a loss of fifteen killed and wounded.--A mob at Jackson, N. H., burned the hotel where the Deputy Provost-Marshal was stopping while serving notices on drafted men.--Carthage, Mo., was burned by the rebel troops.--A party of one hundred guerrillas, under command of Captain Richardson, at two o'clock this afternoon, placed obstructions on the track of the Lebanon Branch Railroad, at New Hope, Ky., twenty miles from the junction, threw the train off the track, and fired into it, but did no damage to the passengers. They then captured the train, burned two passenger-cars, baggage and express cars, destroyed the locomotive, robbed the passengers of money and clothing, and decamped.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate strength in the Atlanta campaign. (search)
th, indicating fully 6000 wounded. The same return shows 569 deserters. The 1542 prisoners captured from Hood and Hardee, shown by increase of absent without leave in their corps, account for the remainder, without examining the returns of Polk's corps and the cavalry. General Johnston's army reached its maximum strength on the New Hope Church line, where he must have had 75,000 for battle when the armies faced each other May 27th. General Sherman's army For Sherman's strength on the New Hope line, see his return May 31st, and deduct Blair's Seventeenth Corps, which did not join the army until June 8th. there numbered, of all arms, for duty, 93,600 men, and several brigades of this force were employed in guarding trains and watching roads in all directions, for Sherman's army had no rear. Odds of less than five to four against him is the great inequality of force which General Johnston complains compelled him to employ dismounted cavalry in holding this line. In a foot-note
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Kentucky, 1864 (search)
rch 22: Affair, Fancy Farms(No Reports.) March 25: Action, Fort Anderson, PaducahILLINOIS--122d Infantry (Co's "C," "H," "K"). KENTUCKY--16th Cavalry. UNITED STATES--8th Colored Heavy Arty.; Gunboats "Paw Paw" and "Peosta." Union loss, 14 killed, 16 wounded. Total, 30. March 27: Skirmish, ColumbusNEW JERSEY--34th Infantry. UNITED STATES--3d Colored Infantry. March 28-April 16: Operations in Eastern KentuckyKENTUCKY--14th, 39th and 40th Infantry. MICHIGAN--11th Cavalry. March 28: Affair, New HopeKENTUCKY--52d Infantry (Detachment). March 30: Scout from Columbus to Clinton and MoscowNEW JERSEY--34th Infantry (Detachment). March 31: Skirmish, Forks of BeaverKENTUCKY--14th and 39th Infantry (Detachments). April --: Skirmish, Creek Head(No Reports.) April 5: Skirmish, Quicksand CreekKENTUCKY--14th Infantry (Co. "I"). April 7: Skirmish, Brushy CreekKENTUCKY--14th and 39th Infantry (Detachments). April 11: Skirmish, ColumbusNEW JERSEY--34th Infantry (Detachment). UNITED STATES--3d C
the main road as far as Burnt Hickory, passing through a strange land, a country desolate and uninhabited. It seemed like forests burned over, with here and there an opening. There were innumerable knolls of light soil, dotted with half-burned trees, almost without limbs, every shape and size. The march from the Etowah was a sad and gloomy one, possibly ominous. At Burnt Hickory, Thomas sent Palmer with his and me with my corps off toward the right to catch somewhere the Van Wert and New Hope road, while Hooker went on straight toward the same destination by the main highway, using wood and farm roads as far as he could to help forward his divisions. Ed. McCook's cavalry was a little in advance of Hooker, well spread out. Schofield, farther to the left, with his cavalry under Stoneman cared for the left flank, and moved southward more slowly. Garrard, on the right, with his troops of cavalry, had pressed back the Confederate horse toward Dallas, and discovered the left of
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 31: battle of Pickett's Mill (search)
ring and cannonading. These works, some of them detached, connected Johnston's principal line from Lost Mountain with Pine Top. Schofield, about the same time, drove a line of skirmishers away from a small bare hill near Allatoona Creek, placed his artillery upon it, and thence worked a cross fire into the enemy's intrenchments, driving Johnston's men, thus newly exposed in flank, back to near Gilgal Church. We were all along so close to our enemy that the constant skirmish fire of the New Hope line was here repeated. In the meantime, Johnston, continuing his inimitable defensive and delaying tactics, had prepared another new line along Mud Creek. This line followed the east bank of this creek, and was extended so much as to cross the direct wagon road between New Hope and Marietta. It was the same line that ran from Lost Mountain. Here Hardee, who had now retired to the new works, on the night of the 16th posted his batteries. The position covered the open ground toward u
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
63,408 men present for duty. The effective total was returned at 60,564; aggregate present 82,413, guns 187. About 12,000 of the effective force were in the cavalry. Sherman's army was also stronger than at the opening of the campaign, by the reinforcements sent him from the rear. The return of May 31st showed an infantry strength of 4,651 officers and 89,659 men; cavalry, 12,908 officers and men; artillery, 5,600; total, 112,819. Blair's corps, about 9,000, was not with Sherman on the New Hope line, and several brigades were engaged in guarding communications at the rear. About the time that the army crossed the Etowah, Governor Brown ordered the militia and civil officers of the State to assemble at Atlanta. These were exempt from conscription by the Confederate States government, but were now required by the State to enter the military service. Three thousand in number, they were organized into two brigades by Adjt.-Gen. H. C. Wayne. Those not elected officers were requi
ps was four miles distant, intent on cutting off the retreat of Johnston from Dalton. On the 13th, McPherson advancing, Scott was thrown forward to Bald Knob to meet him, where he held the enemy in check three hours, until called off. Subsequently they manned the breastworks, Bouanchaud's battery in action from a hill in the rear. When Sherman was crowding the retreat later, Scott's brigade with a section of the Pointe Couple battery assisted General Wheeler in checking the enemy. On the New Hope line they engaged in heavy skirmishing for a week. From May 10th to June 1st the brigade loss was 341, a due share of which was borne by the Louisianians. Of the Louisiana regiments then with Quarles we snatch a glimpse through the smoke of battle in the report of the gallant Cleburne of the fight of May 27th, near New Hope church: Quarles' brigade was conducted to the rear of Lowry, and formed as a second line. The Fourth Louisiana, Colonel Hunter, finding itself opposite an interval
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ank below the spring, and pulled off his left boot and sock. Very soon he heard a minnie ball pass over his head and strike the bank behind him. He paid no attention to it, thinking it was a random shot, but a second, third and fourth one came, striking the bank about the same place; but the last one came so very near his head that he concluded to beat a retreat, being convinced that a picket in a tree top, not far distant, was taking deliberate aim at him. When, on the 4th of June, the New Hope line was abandoned for the Lost Mountain line, and that afterwards for the Noonday Valley line, the Third Maryland took part in every movement. On the 22d, at Marietta, the battery was ordered out on the field with General Stevenson's division, to charge the right wing of the enemy's line. It was placed on a hill half a mile from the Federal force, there to await further orders; but it was not sent forward. Stevenson's division was repulsed, with the loss of a thousand men killed and wo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
ank below the spring, and pulled off his left boot and sock. Very soon he heard a minnie ball pass over his head and strike the bank behind him. He paid no attention to it, thinking it was a random shot, but a second, third and fourth one came, striking the bank about the same place; but the last one came so very near his head that he concluded to beat a retreat, being convinced that a picket in a tree top, not far distant, was taking deliberate aim at him. When, on the 4th of June, the New Hope line was abandoned for the Lost Mountain line, and that afterwards for the Noonday Valley line, the Third Maryland took part in every movement. On the 22d, at Marietta, the battery was ordered out on the field with General Stevenson's division, to charge the right wing of the enemy's line. It was placed on a hill half a mile from the Federal force, there to await further orders; but it was not sent forward. Stevenson's division was repulsed, with the loss of a thousand men killed and wo