Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Paducah (Kentucky, United States) or search for Paducah (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Belmont, battle at. (search)
Belmont, battle at. Just before Fremont was deprived of his command (see Fremont, John C.) he ordered General Grant to move a co-operative force along the line of the Mississippi River. It was promptly done. A column about 3,000 strong, chiefly Illinois volunteers, under Gen. John A. McClernand, went down from Cairo in transports and wooden gunboats to menace Columbus by attacking Belmont, opposite. At the same time another column, under Gen. C. F. Smith. marched from Paducah to menace Columbus in the rear. Grant went with McClernand. The troops landed 3 miles above Belmont, Nov. 7, 1861, and while they were pushing on the gunboats opened fire upon Columbus. General (Bishop) Polk, the commander, sent General Pillow over the river to reinforce the little garrison at Belmont. A sharp battle ensued, and the Nationals were victorious; but, exposed to the heavy artillery at Columbus, the post was untenable. Giving three cheers for the Union, the Nationals set fire to the Confe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Custom-house, (search)
nia—Eureka, San Diego, San Francisco, Wilmington. Colorado—Denver. Connecticut—Fairfield, Hartford, New Haven, New London, Stonington. Delaware—Wilmington. District of Columbia—Georgetown. Florida—Appalachicola, Cedar Keys, Fernandina, Jacksonville, Key West, Pensacola, St. Augustine, Tampa. Georgia—Atlanta, Brunswick, St. Mary's, Savannah. Illinois—Chicago, Galena. Indiana—Evansville, Indianapolis, Michigan City. Iowa—Burlington. Dubuque. Kentucky—Louisville, Paducah. Loulsiana—Brashear, New Orleans. Maine—Bangor, Bath, Belfast, Castine, Eastport, Ellsworth, Houlton, Kennebunk, Machias, Portland, Saco, Waldoborough, Wiscasset, York. Maryland—Annanolis, Baltimore. Crisfield. Massachusetts—Barnstable, Boston, Edgarton, Fall River, Gloucester, Marblehead, Nantucket, New Bedford, Newburyport, Plymouth. Salem. Michigan—Detroit, Grand Haven, Grand Rapids. Marquette, Port Huron. Minnesota—Duluth, St. Paul. Mi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Forrest, Nathan Bedford 1821-1877 (search)
leader in the West. He made an extensive raid in Tennessee and Kentucky, with about 5,000 mounted men, in March and April, 1864. He had been skirmishing with Gen. W. S. Smith in northern Mississippi, and, sweeping rapidly across the Tennessee Nathan Bedford Forrest. River into western Tennessee, rested a while at Jackson, and then (March 23) pushed on towards Kentucky. A part of his force captured Union City the next day, with the National garrison of 450 men. Forrest then pushed on to Paducah, on the Ohio River, with 3,000 men, and demanded the surrender of Fort Anderson there, in which the little garrison of 700 men, under Colonel Hicks, had taken refuge. It was refused; and, after assailing the works furiously, and plundering and burning the town until midnight, he ceased the assault. Hearing of reinforcements for Hicks approaching, he retreated (March 27), with a loss of 300 men killed and wounded. The National loss was sixty killed and wounded. Forrest was chagrined by
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fremont, John Charles 1813-1890 (search)
pirit of those States, requested Fremont to modify his proclamation on these points. He declined to do so, when the President, at Fremont's request, issued an order for such a modification. Fremont could not, for it would imply that he thought the measure wrong, which he did not. Fremont was censured for his failure to reinforce Colonel Mulligan at Lexington. The public knew very little of his embarrassments at that time. Pressing demands came for reinforcements from General Grant at Paducah. At various points in his department were heard cries for help, and a peremptory order came from General Scott for him to forward 5,000 troops immediately to Washington, D. C., notwithstanding McClellan numbered 75,000 within easy call of the capital. Fremont's force, never exceeding 56,000, was scattered over his department. Chafing under unjust complaints, he proceeded to put into execution his plan of ridding the Mississippi Valley of Confederates. His plan contemplated the capture
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grant, Ulysses Simpson (search)
Taylor, and then under General Scott, taking part in every battle between Vera Cruz and the city of Mexico. He was made captain in 1853, and resigned the next year, when he settled in St. Louis. He was one of the first to offer his services to the national government when the Civil War broke out, but, as no notice was taken of him, became colonel of the 21st Illinois Infantry. In May, 1861, he was appointed a brigadier-general of volunteers, and placed in command at Cairo. He occupied Paducah, broke up the Confederate camp at Belmont, and in February, 1862, captured Forts Henry and Donelson. He was then promoted to major-general; conducted the battle of Pittsburg Landing, or Shiloh, and for a while was second in command to Halleck. He performed excellent service in the West and Southwest, especially in the vicinity of the Mississippi River, and at and near the Tennessee River, in 1863. He was promoted to lieutenant-general March 1, 1864, and awarded a gold medal by Congress.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kentucky, (search)
al (Bishop) Polk, with a considerable force, seized the strong position at Columbus, under the pretext that National forces were preparing to occupy that place. The Confederate Secretary of War publicly telegraphed to Polk to withdraw his troops; President Davis privately telegraphed to him to hold on, saying, The end justifies the means. So Columbus was held and fortified by the Confederates. General Grant, then in command of the district at Cairo, took military possession of Paducah, in northern Kentucky, with National troops, and the neutrality of Kentucky was no longer respected. The seizure of Columbus opened the way for the infliction upon the people of that First (permanent) State-House, Frankfort, Ky. Kentucky River, from high Bridge. State of the horrors of war. All Kentucky, for 100 miles south of the Ohio River, was made a military department, with Gen. Robert Anderson, the hero of Fort Sumter, for its commander. Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston, was in command of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Paducah. (search)
Paducah. General Forrest, the Confederate cavalry leader captured Jackson, Tenn., and, moving northward, appeared before Paducah, held by Colonel Hicks, with 700 men. His demand for a surrender was accompanied with the threat, If you surrender you shall be treated as prisoners of war, but if I have to storm your works you may expect no quarter. He made three assaults, and then retired after losing over 300 men, and moved on to Fort Pillow. Paducah. General Forrest, the Confederate cavalry leader captured Jackson, Tenn., and, moving northward, appeared before Paducah, held by Colonel Hicks, with 700 men. His demand for a surrender was accompanied with the threat, If you surrender you shall be treated as prisoners of war, but if I have to storm your works you may expect no quarter. He made three assaults, and then retired after losing over 300 men, and moved on to Fort Pillow.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sherman, William Tecumseh 1820-1829 (search)
character and disinterestedness in anything except the faithful performance of their duty, and the success of every one engaged in the great battle for the preservation of the Union. Third, they have honorably won this distinction upon many well-fought battle-fields. I will only mention some of his services while serving under my command. To General Sherman I was greatly indebted for his promptness in forwarding to me, during the siege of Fort Donelson, reinforcements and supplies from Paducah. At the battle of Shiloh, on the first day, he held with raw troops the key points to the landing. To his individual effort I am indebted for the success of that battle. Twice hit, and (I think three) horses shot under him on that day, he maintained his position with his raw troops. It is no disparagement to any other officer to say that I do not believe there was another division commander on the field who had the skill or experience to have done it. His services as division commander
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
16, 1861 General Butler captures Forts Hatteras and Clark, at the entrance of Hatteras Inlet, with 715 prisoners, and twenty-five guns......Aug. 29, 1861 General Fremont proclaims martial law in Missouri, with freedom to the slaves of active rebels......Aug. 31, 1861 [This act was disapproved by the President.] General Grant assumes command of southeastern Missouri......Sept. 1, 1861 Advance of the Confederates into Kentucky, and capture of Columbus......Sept. 3-12, 1861 Paducah, Ky., occupied by General Grant......Sept. 6, 1861 Gen. George H. Thomas assigned to command at camp Dick Robinson, east Kentucky......Sept. 10, 1861 Siege and surrender of Lexington, Mo........Sept. 11-20, 1861 Bowling Green, Ky., occupied by the Confederates......Sept. 18, 1861 Gen. O. M. Mitchel assumes command of the Department of the Ohio......Sept. 21, 1861 Gen. William T. Sherman supersedes General Anderson in the Department of the Cumberland......Oct. 8, 1861 Gen. O
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
...August, 1861 Confederate troops from Tennessee occupy Columbus......Sept. 4, 1861 General Grant, with two regiments and two gunboats, takes possession of Paducah, and proclaims that he comes solely to defend the State from aggression......Sept. 6, 1861 Legislature by resolution orders Confederate troops to leave the SJuly 5, 1864 Many citizens arrested by General Burbridge, under General Sherman, as Sons of liberty, American Knights, etc......1864 A number of citizens of Paducah, Columbus, and vicinity banished to Canada......August, 1864 Commission sent by General Burbridge to investigate the conduct of Gen. Eleazer A. Paine, who had produced a fifty-one days reign of terror at Paducah. Paine flees to Illinois......September, 1864 James Speed, of Louisville, Attorney-General of United States......November, 1864 Law consolidating Transylvania and Kentucky universities......February, 1865 John C. Breckinridge appointed Secretary of War, Confederate Stat
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