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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the first conflict. (search)
(quarantes hectares) of tall forests in a single day. Sometimes an unfair advantage was taken of the aptitude of the volunteers for this kind of work. They had scarcely been mustered into service when a great portion of the time which should have been devoted to drilling was employed in the formation of artistically constructed abattis and in making large entrenched camps in all the positions which it was suspected the enemy intended to attack in the vicinity of Washington, Louisville, Paducah, and St. Louis. These works, at first, were only simple breastworks (épaulements), formed of trunks of trees and earth, on the skirts of clearings which had been made for the purpose of freeing the approaches of the positions to be defended, and were protected by abattis of from ten to forty feet in thickness, where all the branches, skilfully turned outward, sharpened at the points, and hardened by fire, were inextricably intertwined. It was soon rendered necessary to construct improved
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the first autumn. (search)
ne of great importance to the Federals in the river-war they were already contemplating: it was Paducah, at the confluence of the Tennessee and the Ohio. It was, in fact, the key of the first of thoave disposed of a sufficient force to keep Price in check. The garrisons which occupied Cairo, Paducah, and the two points adjacent to Bird's Point, in Missouri, and Fort Holt, in Kentucky, did not deau650 men At Bird's Point and Norfolk3,510 men At Cairo4,826 men At Fort Holt3,595 men At Paducah7,791 men Under Lane2,200 men At Monroe and near Cairo900 men —— Total55,695 men After ts in that State: Fort Holt, opposite Cairo, at the confluence of the Ohio and the Mississippi; Paducah, at the confluence of the Tennessee and the Ohio; and Smithland, at the confluence of the last- by surprise. The prompt action of Grant, as we have stated, alone prevented him from reaching Paducah in time. For a while a real comedy was enacted between the governors of Kentucky and Tennessee
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—the first winter. (search)
econd, under General Grant, guarded the Mississippi and the mouth of the Tennessee at Cairo and Paducah. The third, under General Buell, operated in Kentucky, with its centre near Elizabethtown. Thrth, the former to the left, the latter to the right, and finally emptied into the Ohio, one at Paducah, the other at Smithland, a little higher up. It was a road with two tracks, open in the most vueir forces in order to strike a decisive blow. All the available troops to be found at Cairo, Paducah, and St. Louis were hurried on transports for the purpose of joining Grant, while several regimf February, and was completed by the 3d of March. The next day a party of Federal cavalry from Paducah penetrated into its abandoned entrenchments with its spiked guns and still burning magazines. ion. Finally, at Eastport it again resumes its original course to run directly north as far as Paducah. The distance in a straight line between those two points is about two hundred and sixty kilom