Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Paris, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) or search for Paris, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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n were matured and enacted in the course of that and the two following sessions. A treaty between the Great Powers of Western Europe, intended to provide for the more effectual suppression of the African Slave-Trade, was matured and signed at Paris in 1841. It necessarily accorded a qualified reciprocal right to search suspected cruisers to the National vessels of the subscribing parties. Gen. Cass, then our Envoy at Paris, and a prospective candidate for President, resisted and defeated Paris, and a prospective candidate for President, resisted and defeated the accession of our Government to this most righteous and necessary increase of power to the international police of the ocean, and earned thereby the qualified approbation of the Slave Power; as was evinced in the Presidential election of 1848. A similar treaty was now negotiated between the United States and Great Britain; and a bill designed to give effect to its provisions was reported June 12, 1862. to the Senate by Mr. Sumner, considered, and passed: June 16. Yeas 34; Nays 4. The
ng negroes among their troops ; and thereupon offering to pay for all negroes taken in arms, and guaranteeing, to every one who should desert the Rebel standard, full security to follow within these lines any occupation which he shall think proper. Lord Cornwallis, during his Southern campaign, proclaimed freedom to all slaves who would join him; and his subordinates — Tarleton especially — took away all who could be induced to accompany them. Jefferson, in a letter to Dr. Gordon, Dated Paris, July 16, 1788. estimates that this policy cost Virginia no less than 30,000 slaves in one year; most of them dying soon of small-pox and camp-fever. Thirty were carried off by Tarleton from Jefferson's own homestead; and Jefferson characteristically says: Letter to Gordon aforesaid. Had this been to give them freedom, he would have done right. The War of 1812 with Great Britain was much shorter than that of the Revolution, and was not, like that, a struggle for life or death. Yet,