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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 41 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 9: the last review. (search)
es are now commanded by the chivalrous De Trobriand and the sterling soldiers, Pierce of Michigan and McAllister of New Jersey. Their division flag now bears the mingled symbols of the two corps, the Second and Third,--the diamond and the trefoil. Over them far floats the mirage-like vision of them on the Peninsula, and then at Bristow, Manassas, and Chantilly, and again the solid substance of them at Chancellorsville, and on the stormy front from the Plumb Run gorge to the ghastly Peach Orchard, where the earth shone red with the bright facings of their brave Zouaves thick-strewn amidst the blue, as we looked down from smoking Round Top. Then in the consolidation for the final trial bringing the prestige and spirit and loyalty of their old corps into the Second,--making this the strongest corps in the army,--adding their splendid valor to the fame of this in which they merged their name. Now come those heavy artillery regiments which the exigencies of the service drew sudde
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Kershaw. (search)
f the stone wall. Along this wall the division was then formed, Semmes in reserve to me and Barksdale on my left, supported by Wofford in reserve. Artillery was also placed along the wall to my right, and Colonel DeSausseure's 15th South Carolina regiment was thrown beyond it to protect it. Hood's division was then moving in our rear towards our right to gain the enemy's left flank, and I was directed to commence the attack so soon as General Hood became engaged, swinging round towards Peach Orchard and at the same time establishing connection with Hood on my right and co-operating with him. It was understood he was to sweep down the enemy's line in a direction perpendicular to our then line of battle. I was told that Barksdale would move with me and conform to my movement. These directions 1 received in various messages from the Lieutenant-General and the Major-General commanding, and in part by personal communication with them. In my center-front was a stone house, and to the l
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel E. P. Alexander's report of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
d's and McLaw's divisions, and to take command of the three battalions of artillery accompanying them, viz: my own battalion, of twentysix guns (commanded in my absence by Major Frank Huger), Colonel Cabell's, of eighteen guns, and Major Henry's, of eighteen guns. About 4 P. M. the enemy's position having been defined and preparations for an assault upon him made, I placed in position against him the eighteen guns of Cabell's battalion and eighteen of my own battalion, to fire upon the Peach Orchard position, while Henry's battalion accompanied and fought with Hood's division in its attack upon Round-Top. The first-mentioned battalions opened fire from two pieces of wood, Cabell's on the right about six hundred yards, and my own on the left about four hundred yards from the enemy's position. At such close quarters the fight was most severe and bloody, and in some batteries the casualties were so heavy that I was compelled to get assistance from the infantry to work the guns after
oading her cargo into a rebel steamer alongside. The Susquehanna, accompanied by the Kanawha, then got under weigh, and steamed within gunshot and opened fire, which was returned by the fort, and kept up for an hour on both sides. In the mean time the crew deserted the steamer. She was soon discovered to be adrift, and dropped down with the current about a mile, when the Kanawha was ordered to go in and bring her out, which she did under a heavy fire from the fort. The battles of Peach Orchard and Savage's Station, Va., were fought this day.--(Doc. 78 and Supplement.) A fight took place at Henderson, Ky., between a company of the Louisville Provost-Guard, supported by a detachment of Captain Andrew's Michigan battery, and a force of rebel guerrillas, which resulted in the complete rout of the latter. Moorefield, Va., was this day captured by a body of Ashby's cavalry, eighty-six in number, under the command of Colonel Harris. A large company of the Maryland Home Gua
le's house, across Lousy run, about one hundred rods south of White's Creek. The third division was about half a mile west of Two Taverns, on Jesse Werley's farm. This division hospital was the most remote of all the Union hospitals from the town of Gettysburgh. They contained together one thousand four hundred wounded, including seventy-five rebels. Dr. Clark, surgeon in charge. The three divisions of the Sixth corps hospital were, the first, about the house of John Frastle, near Peach Orchard, and the Second and Third divisions in tents near by. There were three hundred inmates. Dr. Chamberlain, surgeon in charge. The Eleventh corps hospital occupied the house and farm of George Spangler. The divisions were consolidated under the charge of Dr. Armstrong. It contained one thousand nine hundred wounded, of whom one hundred were said to be confederates. The Twelfth corps hospital was under the charge of Dr. Ernest Goodman. Its three divisions, under separate organizati
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Malvern Hill. (search)
es by night which brought into relief the able talents, active foresight, and tenacity of purpose of our commander, the unity of action on the part of his subordinates, and the great bravery, firmness, and confidence in their superiors on the part of the rank and file. These conflicts from the beginning of the Seven Days fighting were the engagement at Oak Grove, the battles of Beaver Dam Creek and Gaines's Mill, the engagements at Golding's and Garnett's farms, and at Allen's farm or Peach Orchard; the battle of Savage's Station; the artillery duel at White Oak Swamp; the battle of Glendale (or Charles City cross-roads); the action of Turkey Creek, and the battle of Malvern Hill. Each was a success to our army, the engagement of Malvern Hill being the most decisive. The result of the movement was that on the 2d of July our army was safely established at Harrison's Landing, on the James, in accordance with General McClellan's design. The present narrative will be confined to eve
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.42 (search)
Cemetery Ridge. 18. Little Round Top. 19. Round Top. 20. Devil's Den. 21. Wheat-field. 22. Trostle's farm. 23. Peach Orchard. 24. Seminary Ridge. 19 to 25. About extreme right of Longstreet's line. our lines so far as then occupied, after y across the interval between Cemetery and Seminary ridges, crossing the latter two miles from Ziegler's Grove. From Peach Orchard to Ziegler's is nearly a mile and a half. For half a mile the road runs along a ridge at right angles to that of Devld the wood in front of the Peach Orchard angle. As I rode back a view from that direction showed how much farther Peach Orchard was to the front of the direct line than it appeared from the orchard itself. In fact there was a Colonel Edward Ee. Its left where it crosses the run abuts rather on Devil's Den than Round Top; it was commanded by the much higher Peach Orchard crests, and was therefore not an eligible line to occupy, although it became of importance during the battle. As t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.47 (search)
moved to the attack, the movement being taken up by the whole division. When Hood's division first attacked, General Meade, alarmed for the safety of his left wing, and doubtless fully alive to the importance of holding so vital a point as Round Top and its adjacent spurs, commenced sending reenforcements to the threatened points. We encountered some of these in our first advance, and others were arriving as McLaws came up on our left. In its advance this division extended from the Peach Orchard near the Emmitsburg road, on its left, to the Wheat-field north of the hill on which we had captured the Federal battery, where its right wing connected with my left. As McLaws advanced, we again moved forward on his right, and the fighting continued in see-saw style--first one side and then the other gaining ground or losing it, with small advantage to either, until dark. At the close of the engagement Hood's division held the hill where the battery had been taken and the ridge to i
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Kershaw's brigade at Gettysburg. (search)
or-General Lafayette McLaws, C. S. A. From a photograph. with me and conform to my movement; that Semmes would follow me, and Wofford follow Barksdale. These instructions I received in sundry messages from General Longstreet and General McLaws, and in part by personal communication with them. In my center-front was a stone farm-house [supposed to be Rose's], with a barn also of stone. These buildings were about five hundred yards from our position, and on a line with the crest of the Peach Orchard hill. The Federal infantry was posted along the front of the orchard, and also on the face looking toward Rose's. Six of their batteries were in position, three at the orchard near the crest of the hill, and the others about two hundred yards in rear, extending in the direction of Little Round Top. Behind Rose's was a morass, and, on the right of that, a stone wall running parallel with our line, some two hundred yards from Rose's. Beyond the morass was a stony hill, covered with heav
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.53 (search)
ries; it crossed the Wheat-field, cleared the woods, and had an encounter with a portion of Benning's brigade, which was retiring. Hood's and McLaws's divisions were falling back under Longstreet's orders to their strong position, resting on Peach Orchard and covering Hill's line. It needs but a moment's examination of the official map to see that our troops on the left were locked up. As to the center, Pickett's and Pettigrew's assaulting divisions had formed no part of A. P. Hill's line, whcture on P. 378.) from the Gettysburg Cyclorama. Thus the battle of Gettysburg closed as it had opened, with a very creditable cavalry battle. General Lee now abandoned the attempt to dislodge Meade, intrenched a line from Oak Hill to Peach Orchard, started all his impedimenta to the Potomac in advance, and followed with his army on the night of July 4th, via Fairfield. This compelled Meade to take the circuitous routes through the lower passes; and the strategic advantage to Lee and d
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