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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Missouri Volunteers. (search)
service 10 Officers and 102 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 94 Enlisted men by disease. Total 208. 13th Missouri Regiment Infantry. Organized at St. Louis, Mo., August 9 to November 5, 1861. Attached to Dept. of Missouri to February, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, District of Cairo, to February, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Army of the Tennessee, to May, 1862. Service. Ordered to Cairo, Ill., January 26, 1862. Reconnoissance from Smithland, Ky., toward Fort Henry, Tenn., January 31-February 2. Capture of Fort Henry, Tenn., February 6. Investment and capture of Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 11-16. Expedition to Clarksville and Nashville, Tenn., February 22-March 6. Moved to Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., March 14-17. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Transferred to Ohio as the 22nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry May 29, 1862 (which see). 13th Missouri Regime
s, to July, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Kimball's Division, District of Eastern Arkansas, to August, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Arkansas Expedition, to January, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Arkansas, to March, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Arkansas, to May, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 7th Army Corps, to February, 1865. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 7th Army Corps, to August, 1865. Service. Reconnoissance from Smithland, Ky., toward Fort Henry, Tenn., January 31-February 2. Operations against Fort Henry, Tenn., February 2-6. Capture of Fort Henry February 6. Investment and capture of Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 12-16. Expedition to Clarksville and Nashville, Tenn., February 22-March 5. Moved to Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., March 14-17. Battle of Shiloh April 6-7. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Pursuit to Booneville June 1-6. Duty at Corinth, Miss., till Oc
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States Colored Troops. (search)
itary District of Kentucky and Dept. of Kentucky, to April, 1866. Service. Garrison duty in District of Kentucky, at Bowling Green, Camp Nedson and other points till April, 1866. Mustered out April 24, 1866. 13th United States Colored Regiment Heavy Artillery Organized at Camp Nelson, Ky., June 23, 1864. Attached to Military District of Kentucky, Dept. of the Ohio, to February, 1865, and to Dept. of Kentucky, to November, 1865. Service. Garrison duty at Camp Nelson, Smithland, Lexington and other points in Kentucky till November-1865. Mustered out November 18, 1865. 14th United States Colored Regiment Heavy Artillery Organized at New Berne and Morehead City, N. C., from 1st North Carolina Colored Heavy Artillery March 17, 1864. Attached to Defenses of New Berne, N. C., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to January, 1865. Subdistrict of New Berne, Dept. of North Carolina, and Subdistrict of Beaufort, N. C., Dept. of North Carolina, to December,
ht start; skirmishing near Berryville; we keep to the left, and encamp near Bunker Hill. August 20.--Rain. Apples and corn; I drew eight months pay to 31st July, 1864; cleaned my pistols; skirmishing in front; drew and cooked two days rations; Government charging officers twenty-five cents each for pistol-cartridge; at those prices I can't afford to kill Yanks for Jeff, unless he gives scalp money. August 21.--Daylight start; filed right at Bunker Hill; struck across country through Smithland to near Charleston; came upon Yankees intrenched; put in line; heavy skirmishing just in our front; our men are much exposed, judging from the wounded brought out past us; we drive them from their first line; fighting continued until away in night; on our right heavy cannonading all day; suppose it is Longstreet at Snicker's Gap. August 26.--Clear; Captain bought a Spencer rifle for $25; learn the force we were opposed to yesterday was 10,000 cavalry; cannonading toward evening, about B
rnished an illustration of traits destined afterwards peculiarly to characterize the generalship of Grant. For two months afterwards, Grant was occupied in holding the country at the junction of the great rivers, near which his headquarters were established, and in organizing and disciplining his forces, which by the 1st of November, were increased to nearly twenty thousand men. He was kept strictly subordinate by Fremont, and allowed to make no movement of importance by that commander; Smithland, however, at the mouth of the Cumberland, was occupied by C. F. Smith without opposition, a few weeks after Paducah. Several times Grant suggested the feasibility of capturing Columbus, an important position on the east bank of the Mississippi, about twenty miles below Cairo; and, on the 10th of September, he even asked permission to make the attempt: If it was discretionary with me, with a little addition to my present force, I would take Columbus. No notice was taken of this applicatio
odore Foote can make a gunboat demonstration at the same time, it will assist in carrying out the deception. H. W. Halleck, Major-General. Two letters of instructions from Major-General Halleck to Brigadier-General Grant, for movement against Fort Henry. headquarters, Department of the Missouri, St. Louis, January 30, 1862. Brigadier-General U. S. Grant, Cairo, Ill.: You will immediately prepare to send forward to Fort Henry, on the Tennessee river, all your available force from Smithland, Paducah, Cairo, Fort Holt, Bird's Point, etc. Sufficient garrisons must be left to hold these places against an attack from Columbus. As the roads are now almost impassable for large forces, and as your command is very deficient in transportation, the troops will be taken in steamers up the Tennessee river as far as practicable. Supplies will also be taken up in steamers as far as possible. Flag-Officer Foote will protect the transports with his gunboats. The Benton, and perhaps some
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
use they could devise. The little boys were allowed to spit in their faces. From there they were sent to Camp Morton, Ind., where they were stripped, their clothes searched, and not as much as a button left them. At Buffington's Island General Morgan and the other half of the command cut their way through the Yankee files and went on till the 26th of July, passing through the following towns in Ohio: Portland, Harrisonville, Nelsonville, Cumberland, Greenville, Washington, Moorefield, Smithland, New Alexandria, Richmond, Springfield, Mechanicsville, West Point and Salineville. Near the last place General Morgan and his brother, Colonel Morgan, were captured with the rest of the command, the chief officers being sentenced to the penitentiary at Columbus, Ohio, and the rest of the command to Camp Chase, receiving the same treatment as the others. The general and his part of the command were in about ten miles of the Pennsylvania line, fighting all the way. The number of towns
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the first autumn. (search)
of the Missouri— one which placed the rivers that unite near Cairo under his special charge. He occupied Cape Girardeau, Commerce, and Bird's Point, on the right bank of the Mississippi. His base of operations was at Cairo, in Illinois. After the neutrality of Kentucky had been violated he had taken possession of the following points in that State: Fort Holt, opposite Cairo, at the confluence of the Ohio and the Mississippi; Paducah, at the confluence of the Tennessee and the Ohio; and Smithland, at the confluence of the last-named river and the Cumberland. He thus commanded the mouths of the three river lines which penetrated into the South. A certain number of wooden gunboats, old merchant-vessels armed in haste, and some large steamers, with several decks, turned into transports, constituted a flotilla which connected these different posts with each other. The Confederates, on their side, had closed the three navigable routes, which their adversaries had not yet any serious
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—the first winter. (search)
he Cumberland, ran parallel from south to north, the former to the left, the latter to the right, and finally emptied into the Ohio, one at Paducah, the other at Smithland, a little higher up. It was a road with two tracks, open in the most vulnerable part of the Confederate line. In order to command its entrance they had erectedamusing the Confederates at Russellville, not far from Bowling Green, embarked on Green River, a tributary of the Ohio, and came down this latter river as far as Smithland, at the confluence of the Cumberland, where they joined the large convoy of transports. Some of the troops who had appeared before Fort Henry also re-embarked tFort Henry, rapidly descended the Tennessee, with instructions to turn back whatever reinforcements they might meet on their way and direct them to rendezvous at Smithland. On the same day Grant started with his two divisions; and easily driving before him Forrest's cavalry, which had at last come to watch him, he presented himsel
Progress of Events in Kentucky. Louisville Sept. 13. --The Judge of the County Court has ordered the Sheriff to take away the guns from the several companies of the State Guard. It is stated that many of the guns have been spirited away. The Hon. John Bell's boat, the Treadwell, has been seized at Smithland.
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