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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 136 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 27 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 26 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 25 5 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 21 21 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 20 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Donaldsonville (Louisiana, United States) or search for Donaldsonville (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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reat. The enemy was again repulsed at Raceland, but after repeated efforts, succeeded in storming the place. From thence they made an attack yesterterday on Donaldsonville, where they were defeated. I understand they intend to make a dash at New-Orleans, and they are confident that Banks will be compelled to raise the siege of but little of what is occurring between us and the city, but there are indistinct murmurs to the effect that the rebel advance has received a severe check at Donaldsonville, about fifty miles from New-Or leans, and has halted there, awaiting reenforcements. The stake the rebels are playing for is the capture of the Crescent Cityiscouraged by the loss of their two great strongholds on the Mississippi, and by the checks they received at Lafourche and Raceland, and their total defeat at Donaldsonville, have relinquished their ambitious designs upon the Crescent City, and are retreating bag and baggage toward Texas, pursued by Banks's victorious forces. Yes
cavalry, on the Atchafalaya, and instantly unfolded to him his plan of campaign, in which that gallant young officer was to play such a conspicuous part. Majors was to push boldly through the Grosse Tete, Marangoin, and Lafourche country, to Donaldsonville, thence to Thibodeaux, cut off the railroad and telegraph communication, then push rapidly to the Boeuf River, in the rear of Brashear City, and at the first sound of Mouton's and Green's guns, attack them at that place. After seeing Coloner had already arrived at Thibodeaux, after a triumphant campaign throughout the whole Lafourche —— had captured Plaquemine, with one hundred and fifty prisoners, destroyed three large sea-going vessels loaded with valuable stores — had taken Donaldsonville with its garrison — had attacked that same day the enemy at Thibodeaux, driven him with Pyron's Texan infantry, at the point of the bayonet, from his strong position — had charged and routed his cavalry by charging him with Lane's, Stone's
the west bank of the river threatening Plaquemine and Donaldsonville. I started immediately for the first-named place, buty out of the town, and followed them down the river to Donaldsonville, which place he reached in advance of them; by dark, I force of gunboats gave out that they would not attack Donaldsonville, but would go by railroad to Brashear City. I therefoCommander Woolsey in the Princess Royal, in command at Donaldsonville, ordered the Winona to Plaquemin, and stationed the Kiof Texas, had notified the women and children to leave Donaldsonville, as he intended to make an attack. I immediately ordeWeaver, in the Winona, being on the alert, was also at Donaldsonville in time to take part in the repulsing of the enemy. Iace is perfectly secure. The prisoners arrived from Donaldsonville number one hundred and twenty-four--among which are ontates steamer Princess Royal, during an action at Donaldsonville, Louisiana, on the morning of the twenty-eighth instant, nam
ettors of the insurrection, is virtually abandoned by its military agents. In Louisiana, General Banks succeeded General Butler. After spending some months in organizing the department and disciplining the new levies which constituted its force, General Banks made a rapid and successful series of marches and contests, in which he drove the insurgent troops out of the Attakapas and Teche regions, well known as the richest portions of that very productive State, captured Alexandria and Donaldsonville, the seats of its fugitive seditious executive and legislative authorities, crossed the Mississippi at Bayou Sara, and there receiving an additional column which was ascending from Baton Rouge, invested Port Hudson, which, excluding Vicksburgh, was the only remaining stronghold of the insurrection on the great river. It will be remembered that on the twenty-second day of September, 1862, the President issued a proclamation requiring the insurgents to lay down their arms and return to
ny military restrictions whatever. The trade of the Mississippi at intermediate points within the Department of the Gulf is held subject only to such limitations as may be necessary to prevent a supply of provisions and munitions, of war reaching the enemies of the country. 2. The products of the country intended for general market may be brought into military posts on the line of the Mississippi within the Department of the Gulf, without restraint, namely, at New-Orleans, Carrolton, Donaldsonville, Baton Rouge, and Port Hudson. 3. Officers or soldiers of the army are hereby directed to transfer to lion. B. B. Sanders, Agent of the Treasury Department, or his deputies, taking receipts therefor, all captured, abandoned, or sequestrated property not required for military purposes, in accordance with General Orders No. 88. 4. The Military Court of this Department is hereby invested with exclusive jurisdiction in all cases of extortion, excessive or unreasonable charges, or unju