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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 136 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 27 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 26 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 25 5 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 21 21 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 20 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Donaldsonville (Louisiana, United States) or search for Donaldsonville (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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ve previously informed the Commanding General. General Weitzel landed at Donaldsonville, and took up his line of march on Sunday, the twenty-sixth of October. About nine (9) miles beyond Donaldsonville he met the enemy in force; a sharp engagement ensued, in which he lost eighteen (18) killed and sixty-eight (68) wounded. Fulropose now to give you a more detailed report of my operations since I left Donaldsonville. I left this place at six o'clock on Sunday morning last, and marched on trted up, accompanied by four gunboats. Arrived at a point four miles below Donaldsonville, where the troops were landed and marched into the town, the transports following along with them. The front of where the village of Donaldsonville once stood is now in ruins, having been shelled by our gunboats some time since, for having two miles above Napoleonville, which is said to be about fifteen miles from Donaldsonville. At this point there were several signs of the enemy. The cavalry on the
twenty-fourth of October, Gen. Butler sent a force, under Brig.-Gen. Weitzel, to operate on the west bank of the Mississippi, in the La Fourche district. He engaged a considerable body of the enemy on the twenty-fifth, about nine miles from Donaldsonville, and defeated them, with the loss of their commander, a large number killed and wounded, and two hundred and sixty-eight prisoners. Our loss was eighteen killed and sixty-eight wounded. This victory opened the whole of that part of the country. General Butler's reports of the military operations in his department are submitted herewith, marked Exhibit No. 7. (See Donaldsonville.) In the department of the South the only military operations which have been undertaken were the reconnoissances of the Pocotaligo and Coosahatchie Rivers. These expeditions under Brig.-Gen. Brannan and Col. Barton, encountered a considerable force of the enemy on the twenty-second of October, and engagements ensued, in which we lost thirty-two killed
, for some time past, pretty generally rumored that an expedition of some sort was about to take place in the neighborhood of Berwick's Bay, but when or how no one could tell. All that we knew was that the rebels were collecting forces above Donaldsonville, in the neighborhood of Plaquemine, that they now and then came in collision with our pickets, run off all the horses, mules, and cattle they could lay their hands on, and that they, moreover, had a steamer, called the J. A. Cotton, lurking sdred, namely, Four, net's Yellow jacket battalion, of some three hundred men, of which he was a member, and eight hundred of the Twenty-eighth Louisiana; also, Simms's battery and the Pelican battery of Parrott guns, the same who fought us at Donaldsonville and Lapataville. Colonel Gray was commander of the post, a man of some social consideration, who once run for Senator against Benjamin. The rebel loss is not known; but two women who came to Brashear under flag of truce, say they knew of fi