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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fry, Joseph 1711-1794 (search)
Fry, Joseph 1711-1794 Military officer; born in Andover, Mass., in April, 1711; was an ensign in the army that captured Louisburg in 1745, and a colonel in the British army at the capture of Fort William Henry by Montcalm in 1757. He escaped and reached Fort Edward. In 1775 Congress appointed him brigadier-general, but in the spring of 1776 he resigned on account of infirmity. He died in Fryeburg, Me., in 1794. Naval officer; born in Louisiana, about 1828: joined the navy in 1841; was promoted lieutenant in September, 1855; resigned when Louisiana seceded; was unable to secure a command in the Confederate navy, but was commissioned an officer in the army. In 1873 he became captain of the Virginius, known as a Cuban war steamer. His ship was captured by a Spanish war vessel, and he, with many of his crew, was shot as a pirate in Santiago de Cuba, Nov. 7, 1873. See filibuster.
to the Bay of Fundy, and on his return captures a schooner and tender which were in search of the Margranetto......June, 1775 Col. Benedict Arnold, with a force of about 1,100 men, passes up the Kennebec to attack Quebec......September, 1775 Captain Mowatt arrives in Falmouth (now Portland) with four armed vessels, Oct. 17, with orders from Admiral Graves to destroy the town, which he burns......Oct. 18, 1775 Warren incorporated; first town on St. George River......Nov. 7, 1776 Fryeburg, scene of Lovewell's fight in 1725, incorporated......Jan. 11, 1777 Counties of York, Cumberland, and Lincoln, by vote of Congress, erected into the District of Maine ......1778 British General McLane and 900 troops take possession of the Peninsula of Major Biguyduce (now Castine), begin a fort, and station three sloops-of-war under Captain Mowatt......Jan. 12, 1779 Pittston, the fortieth and last town established by the general court under the royal charter, incorporated......Feb.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Hampshire, (search)
province......Oct. 13, 1716 Vaughan superseded by John Wentworth, by commission signed by Joseph Addison, English Secretary of State......Dec. 7, 1717 Sixteen Scottish families settle at Londonderry, and the first Presbyterian church in New England is organized by Rev. James McGregorie......1719 Capt. John Lovewell makes his first excursion against the Indians in New Hampshire......December, 1724 A grant of land made by New Hampshire to the survivors of the Lovewell defeat at Fryeburg, Me., overlaps a similar grant by Massachusetts in Bow county, which leads to a boundary litigation between New Hampshire and Massachusetts, which lasts forty years. Grants made......May 18-20, 1727 Duration of Assembly limited to three years unless sooner dissolved by the governor......Nov. 21, 1727 David Dunbar appointed lieutenant-governor......June 24, 1731 New Hampshire petitioning the crown in 1732 to decide the boundary question, obtains a royal order appointing commissioner
Jackson, 2.60. Farnham, Harriet, 1.124. Farnham, Martha, devoted Baptist, 1.24, 27, lodges Abijah and Fanny Garrison, 24, 60, kindness to the latter, 26, letter from her, 32. Farnsworth, Amos, Dr., eye-witness of Boston mob, 2.13, lends money for Standard, 359, presides at Groton Convention, 421 Farnum vs. Brooks, 1.129. Farr, Jonathan, Rev. [d. 1845], 2.110. Faulkner, Charles James [b. 1808], 1.251. Fenner, Richard, 1.391. Fenwick, John, 1.363. Fessenden, Samuel [b. Fryeburg, Me., July 16, 1784; d. Mar. 23, 1869], converted by G., 1.289, leaves Colon. Soc., 299, reports converts to Thoughts, 302; aid to G., 312; presides at N. E. Convention, 2.105, at Lib. meeting, 330.— Letter to G., 1.302. Fessenden, William Pitt, [1806-1869], 1.289. Fillmore, Millard [1800-1874], 1.483. Finley, Robert S., Colon. agent, 1.345, 398; Lib. a help to him, 324; falsely accuses G., 388; attends Nat. A. S. Convention, 398; debate with E. Wright, 413. Finney, Charles G., Rev
d H. C. 1768, taught school at Topsfield a short time, while there, m. Sarah Read of Camb. 22 Jan. 1771, was ord. at Fryeburg, Me., Oct. 1775, and d. May 1805. Stephen, bap. 20 May 1750; Mary, bap. 1 Mar. 1751-2; Nicholas, bap. 8 Sept. 1754; Ebenez Ap. 1775; Polly, bap. 28 June 1778, m. Samuel Frost Wyman 10 Nov. 1796; Betsey, bap. 23 Ap. 1780, m. Chas. Walker of Fryeburg, Me.; Eunice, bap. 9 Dec. 1781 (this baptism is recorded as that of Eunice, dau. of Mary Palmer, and underneath the line iary, d. 1 Sept. 1806. Sarah, who m. Lemuel Brown of Chs. 7 Dec. 1797, was dau. of Stephen. Stephen the f. removed to Fryeburg, Me., in 1780, where he was drowned 1 Sept. 1781. Mary Palmer, perhaps wid. of Stephen, m. Ebenezer Day of Fryeburg, Me.,Fryeburg, Me., 13 Feb. 1783. 5. John, s. of Stephen (3), m. Susanna Stratton 28 Nov. 1781, and had Susan, b. 21 Aug. 1782, d. 7 Mar. 1783; John, b. 4 Oct. 1783, grad. H. C. 1802, d. unm., of consumption, 17 Oct. 1802; Joseph, b. 27 Sept. 1784, d. 27 Mar. 1785
o be the same who was pub. to Ruth Frost of Camb. 25 Oct. 1755. He then resided in Boston. 12. William, s. of William (7), grad. II. C. 1737, m. Mary, dau. of Stephen Palmer, and had Martha, b. 8 June 1740, d. 11 May 1741; Nicholas b. 14 Ap. 1742, d. young; Mary, bap. 29 July 1744, d. 15 Nov. 1749 · Sarah, b. 8 Aug. and d. 12 Sept. 1746; William, b. 3 Nov. 1747, grad H. C. 1768, taught school at Topsfield a short time, while there, m. Sarah Read of Camb. 22 Jan. 1771, was ord. at Fryeburg, Me., Oct. 1775, and d. May 1805. Stephen, bap. 20 May 1750; Mary, bap. 1 Mar. 1751-2; Nicholas, bap. 8 Sept. 1754; Ebenezer, bap. 13 Feb. 1757. William the f. taught the Grammar School in Camb. several years, and d. of apoplexy 17 June 1758, a. 39. 13. Jonathan, s. of Jonathan (10), m. Elizabeth Parker 2 Sept. 1763, and had Boradel, bap. 14 Ap. 1765, m. William Cooper 1 Sept. 1784. 14. Josiah, s. of Jonathan (10), by w. Elizabeth had Pemberton, bap. 29 Oct. 1769; William, ,ap. 10 Ju
. 1777); his chil. were Thankful, bap. 16 Ap. 1775; Polly, bap. 28 June 1778, m. Samuel Frost Wyman 10 Nov. 1796; Betsey, bap. 23 Ap. 1780, m. Chas. Walker of Fryeburg, Me.; Eunice, bap. 9 Dec. 1781 (this baptism is recorded as that of Eunice, dau. of Mary Palmer, and underneath the line is written, her husband Stephen Palmer was drowned); Stephen, s. of Stephen and Mary, d. 1 Sept. 1806. Sarah, who m. Lemuel Brown of Chs. 7 Dec. 1797, was dau. of Stephen. Stephen the f. removed to Fryeburg, Me., in 1780, where he was drowned 1 Sept. 1781. Mary Palmer, perhaps wid. of Stephen, m. Ebenezer Day of Fryeburg, Me., 13 Feb. 1783. 5. John, s. of Stephen (3), Fryeburg, Me., 13 Feb. 1783. 5. John, s. of Stephen (3), m. Susanna Stratton 28 Nov. 1781, and had Susan, b. 21 Aug. 1782, d. 7 Mar. 1783; John, b. 4 Oct. 1783, grad. H. C. 1802, d. unm., of consumption, 17 Oct. 1802; Joseph, b. 27 Sept. 1784, d. 27 Mar. 1785; Susanna, b. 26 Feb. 1786, m. Isaac Jones 2 Ap. 1809, and d. before 1822, leaving an only child Lucy Ann, who m. William L. Whitn
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
I have thought it better not to trouble you with answers. Everything, however, has no doubt come safely that you have sent. Mr. Everett, Mr. C. C. Felton, Mr. G. T. Curtis, and Mr. Ticknor were, by Mr. Webster's will, made his literary executors. With his usual promptness Mr. Ticknor began at once to collect, from all quarters, whatever letters, reminiscences, and documents might serve as materials for future publications. He made excursions to Marshfield and its neighborhood, and to Fryeburg in Maine, expressly for the purpose of seeing and taking down the oral narratives of those who had been Mr. Webster's neighbors, or employed by him. . . . . I am surprised anew every day at the sincerity and extent of the sorrow for Mr. Webster's death. There is a touch of repentance in it for the injustice that has been done him, and a feeling of anxiety about the future in our political position, which tend to deepen its channel, as it flows on in a stream that constantly grows broade
lip B., d. 13 May, 1842, the former aged 4 yrs. 10 mos., the latter aged 1 yr. 8 mos. Other chil. have resided here. Philip B. the father leased the mill formerly belonging to Ephraim Cutter (par. 24), 1 Apr. 1843; this lease was continued by P. B. Fessenden & Co., 1850; Fessenden, Whittemore, & Co., 1853; Russell, Fessenden & Co., 1859-1860. 7. Mr. William (H. U. 1768), m. Mrs. Sarah Read, 22 Jan. 1771. She was perhaps the Sarah Fessenden, buried 28 Jan. 1775. He was ordained at Fryeburg, Me., 11 Oct. 1775, and was father of Gen. Samuel Fessenden of Portland, Me., and grandfather of the distinguished Hon. William Pitt Fessenden of the same place. See Book of the Lockes; N. E. Hist. Gen. Register, for Apr. 1871; and Paige. The Mr. William Fessenden, whom the Rev. Samuel Cooke of Menotomy mentioned in his diary, as having heard twice, 4 Jan. 1742, on Ps. 89: 7, and Num. 23: 10, was prob. the graduate of H. U. 1737, and father of the above Rev. William. The father taught the
s for regulating boundaries would restore tranquillity. The overthrow of the missions completed the ruin of French influence. The English themselves had grown skilful in the Indian warfare; and no war par ties of the red men ever displayed more address or her oism than the brave John Lovewell and his companions. His volunteer associates twice returned laden with scalps. On a third expedition, falling into an am- 1725. April. bush of a larger party of Saco Indians, he lost his life in Fryeburg, near a sheet of water which has taken his name; and the little stream that feeds it is still known to the peaceful husbandman as the Battle Brook. At last, the eastern Indians, despairing of success Nov. instigated, but not supported, by the French, unable to contend openly with their opponents, and excelled even in their own methods of warfare, concluded a peace, which was solemnly ratified by the Indian 1726. Aug. 6. chiefs as far as the St. John, and was long and faithfully maintai