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his late adjutant-general and trusted friend, looking at affairs from a Northern point of view, was gradually yielding his conservative views and entering with zeal into the idea of coercing the South. General Johnston, agreeing with neither, did not resent in those he loved that liberty of thought and action which he claimed for himself as his dearest right: San Francisco, California, February 25, 1861. My dear Major: I have received your letter of 22d of January. I found my trunk at Wells, Fargo & Co.'s office. I have no news to give you from this far-off region. Everything is quiet, and the affairs of the department are being conducted quietly and without difficulty from any source; though, without any excuse for it, the Government has allowed every department of the staff here to fall into a state of pauperism, making the military arm as impotent for action here as the greatest enemy of the republic could desire to have it. The district of Oregon owes not less than $200,0
belligerent — were more disposed for fun than fight. About four o'clock, a soldier, Oliver Sallee, stepped up to Nelson Wells, who has been regarded as the leader of the copperheads in this county, and placing his hand good-naturedly against him, playfully asked him if there were any butternuts in town? Wells replied, Yes, I am one! and drawing his revolver, shot at Sallee, but missed him. In an instant Sallee was shot from another direction, and fell; but raising himself up, he fired at Wells, the ball taking effect in his vitals. He (Wells) went as far as Chambers & McCrory's store, and, passing in, fell dead. The copperheads were gathered behind Judge Edwards's office, loading their firearms, and then would step out and fire from the corner at the soldiers indiscriminately, with guns and revolvers. Of course, having come fully prepared, they had vastly the advantage over the soldiers, who were not expecting such an attack, and were, for the most part, unarmed. Those who w
the waste land belonging to the town, on the north side of Mystic River, should be divided, and laid out equally, to every person an equal share that hath been an inhabitant of this town six years, and is twenty-one years old; and the like share to all widows, householders, that have been six years inhabitants. 1703.--A terrific storm occurred in England. Bishop Kidder, Bishop of Bath and Wells, was killed, with his wife, by the falling of chimneys upon them while in bed in the palace at Wells. He was kinsman of the Kidders of Medford. Mrs. Samuel Kidder, now of Medford, is a descendant of Rev. John Rogers, the martyr. In 1712, a day-laborer in Medford was allowed two shillings; for a team, one day, five shillings. The Rev. Aaron Porter's signature may be seen in the townrecords, under date of May 15 and Aug. 20, 1717. June 12, 1717.--There was a hearing before the council concerning the question, whether Cambridge or Charlestown should be the shire-town of Middlesex Co
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Preble, Jedediah 1707-1784 (search)
Preble, Jedediah 1707-1784 Military officer; born in Wells. Me., in 1707; father of Edward Treble; was a sailor in early life, and in 1746 was a captain in a provincial regiment. He was a lieutenant-colonel under General Winslow at the dispersion of the Acadians in 1755. He rose to the rank of brigadier-general in 1759, and was twelve years a Representative. In 1774 the Provincial Congress of Massachusetts made him a brigadier-general. He was a State Senator in 1780, and judge of the Supreme Court. He died in Portland, Me., March 11, 1784.
e, as the latter contended, and the Kennebec River is assigned as the boundary between the two provinces......March, 1646 Court of province of Maine convenes at Wells, at mouth of the Kennebec River, and Edward Godfrey elected governor of the province......1646 Massachusetts, in 1651, laying claim by her charter to all lands 0 Five months truce signed at Sagadahoc by commissioners from Massachusetts and the Indians, who agree to surrender all prisoners and to make a lasting peace at Wells the following May......Nov. 29, 1690 Indians failing to meet President Danforth as agreed at Wells on May 1, he returns to York and sends a reinforcement to WelWells on May 1, he returns to York and sends a reinforcement to Wells. Shortly after their arrival they are attacked by 200 Indians, whom they repulse......June 9, 1691 Charter of William and Mary, or the Provincial charter, passes the seals and receives royal sanction, and the province of Maine is united with the royal province of Massachusetts Bay......Oct. 7, 1691 Two hundred Indians, le
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wheelwright, John 1592- (search)
Wheelwright, John 1592- Clergyman; born in Lincolnshire, England, about 1592; was a graduate of Cambridge University, England, and a classmate of Cromwell. Being driven from his church by Archbishop Laud, in 1636, for Non-conformity, he came to Boston and was chosen pastor of a church in (present) Braintree. Mr. Wheelwright seconded the theological views of Anne Hutchinson (q. v.), and publicly defended them, for which offence he was banished from the Massachusetts Bay colony. He founded Exeter, on a branch of the Piscataqua River; and when, five years later, that town was declared to be within the jurisdiction of Massachusetts, he removed with his family to Wells, Me. In 1646, he returned to Massachusetts, a reconciliation having been effected; and in 1657 he went to England. He returned in 1660, and in May, 1662, became pastor of a church at Salisbury, Mass., where he died, Nov. 15, 1679.
amuel, probe. s. of Nathaniel (3), was Representative of York, Me., for many years Justice of the Peace, Judge of Inferior Court, Member of the Council, and d. at Wells 26 Dec. 1768, a. nearly 95 years, leaving 167 descendants. (Boston Post Boy, Jan. 16, 1769.) Carley, William (prob. Kerley), had a grant of land in Camb., near living in 1691, but not named in his brother Edward's will, 1696. 11. Percival, S. of John (5), grad. H. C. 1680, preached a short time in Stow and also in Wells, Me., but probably was not ordained. He d. here unm. 10 July 1684. 12. Samuel, s. of John (5), was a tailor, and res. here; he m. Elizabeth, dau. of Joseph Sill,75, as Corporal; was appointed Lieutenant 27 June 1689; and served in a later Indian War, during which he was stationed at Groton as Commissary, Sept. 1689, and at Wells as Lieutenant, May 1691, at which last place he had command of Capt. Josiah Convers' Company. He was Selectman nine years between 1688 and 1700, and Town Clerk 16
his sister Deborah, during life, and then the fee to his brother Nathaniel. 3. Nathaniel, s. of Christopher (1), prob. settled in Kittery, Me. In Sept. 1723, Nathaniel (prob. the same or his son) sold the homestead in Cambridge to John Hill, who conveyed it, four days afterwards, to Judah Monis, who long resided there. 4. Samuel, probe. s. of Nathaniel (3), was Representative of York, Me., for many years Justice of the Peace, Judge of Inferior Court, Member of the Council, and d. at Wells 26 Dec. 1768, a. nearly 95 years, leaving 167 descendants. (Boston Post Boy, Jan. 16, 1769.) Carley, William (prob. Kerley), had a grant of land in Camb., near his house, in 1683. Carter, William, by w. Jane, had Rachel, b. 7 Mar. 1675; Ruth, b. 25 Feb. 1677; Hester, b. 8 Mar. 1678, d. 25 June 1678; Elizabeth, b. 15 May 1680. Susanna, m. Richard Eccles 4 June 1677. Jabez, m. Abigail Manning 27 June 1723. Mrs. Elizabeth, d. 3 Feb. 1797, a. 84. Chadwick, John, m. Mary Barlow 30 O
was a printer in Boston 1700, rem. to Connecticut 1714, was a Deacon, and d. at New London 5 May 1757, a. 78. 9. John, s. of John (5), m. Mary, dau. of Joseph Bradish, 22 Nov. 1684, and had John, b. 23 Aug. 1688; Mary, bap. 26 June 1698; Sarah, b. 12 June 1701; Hannah, b.; and perhaps others. 10. Nathaniel, s. of John (5), was living in 1691, but not named in his brother Edward's will, 1696. 11. Percival, S. of John (5), grad. H. C. 1680, preached a short time in Stow and also in Wells, Me., but probably was not ordained. He d. here unm. 10 July 1684. 12. Samuel, s. of John (5), was a tailor, and res. here; he m. Elizabeth, dau. of Joseph Sill, 18 Nov. 1685, and d. soon after 23 July 1692 (the date of his will), leaving children Samuel and Elizabeth. 13. Edward, s. of John (5), a ship-master, d. unm. in 1696. His will, dated 4 Feb. 1695-6, was made on board ship. 14. Thomas, s. of John (5), was living in 1691, but not named in his brother Edward's will, 1696. 1
Feb. 1710-11. Jonathan the f. was a carpenter, but from an early period much engaged in public affairs. He resided near the westerly corner of Brattle and Ash streets from 1665 to 1682, when he exchanged that estate for the original Blue Anchor Tavern, which he kept during the remainder of his life. He served in Philip's War, 1675, as Corporal; was appointed Lieutenant 27 June 1689; and served in a later Indian War, during which he was stationed at Groton as Commissary, Sept. 1689, and at Wells as Lieutenant, May 1691, at which last place he had command of Capt. Josiah Convers' Company. He was Selectman nine years between 1688 and 1700, and Town Clerk 1693, 1698, 1699, 1700. He d. 21 Ap. 1700, a. 61; his w. Martha d. 16 July 1711, a. 67. 5. Jonathan, s. of Jonathan (4), m. Lucy, dau. of Rev. Simon Bradstreet of New London (whose wid. had m. Daniel Epps, and at the time of this marriage was residing in Medf. being a second time a widow), 5 Sept. 1711, and had Lucy, b. 17 Aug.
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