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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 19: battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam (continued). (search)
ol. James A. Walker; 15th Ala., Capt. I. B. Feagin; 12th Ga., Capt. Rogers; 21st Ga., Maj. Thomas C. Glover; 21st N. C., Capt. Miller; 1st N. C. Battn. Attached to Twenty-first North Carolina Regiment. Hays's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Harry T. Hays; 5th La., 6th La., Col. H. B. Strong; 7th, 8th, and 14th La. Artillery, John R. Johnson's and D'Aquin's batteries were the only ones present with this division at Sharpsburg. Maj. A. R. Courtney; Charlottesville (Va.) Art. (Carrington's battery), Chesapeake (Md.) Art. (Brown's battery), Courtney (Va.) Art. (Latiner's battery), Johnson's (Va.) battery, La. Guard Art. (D'Aquin's battery), 1st Md. Batt. (Dement's battery), Staunton (Va.) Art. (Balthis's battery). Hill's Light Division, Maj.-Gen. Ambrose P. Hill:--Branch's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. L. O'B. Branch, Col. James H. Lane; 7th N. C., 18th N. C., Lieut.-Col. Purdie; 28th, 33d, and 37th N. C. Gregg's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Maxcy Gregg; 1st S. C. (provisional army), Maj. E. McCrady, Jr., Col. D.
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 23: battle of Fredericksburg (continued). (search)
d; 60th Ga., Col. W. H. Stiles; 61st Ga., Col. J. H. Lamar, Maj. C. W. McArthur. Trimble's Brigade, Col. R. F. Hoke; 15th Ala.; 12th Ga.; 21st Ga., Lieut.-Col. Thomas W. Hooper; 21st N. C. and 1st N. C. Battn. Early's Brigade, Col. J. A. Walker; 13th Va., Lieut.-Col. J. B. Terrill; 25th, 31st, 44th, 49th, 52d, and 58th Va. Hays's (1st La.) Brigade, Gen. Harry T. Hays; 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th La. Artillery, Capt. J. W. Latimer; Charlottesville (Va.) Art., Capt. J. McD. Carrington; Chesapeake (Md.) Art., Lieut. John E. Plater; Courtney (Va.) Art., Lieut. W. A. Tanner; 1st Md. Batt., Capt. William F. Dement; La. Guard Art., Capt. Louis E. D'Aquin; Staunton (Va.) Art., Lieut. Asher W. Garber. Jackson's division, Brig.-Gen. William B. Taliaferro:--First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. F. Paxton; 2d Va., Capt. J. Q. A. Nadenbousch; 4th Va., Lieut.-Col. R. D. Gardner, Maj. William Terry; 5th Va., Lieut.-Col. H. J. Williams; 27th Va., Lieut.-Col. J. K. Edmondson; 33d Via., Col. Edwin G. Lee.
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
Jones's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John M. Jones, Lieut.-Col. R. H. Dungan; 21st Va., Capt. W. P. Moseley; 25th Va., Col. J. C. Higginbotham, Lieut.-Col. J. A Robinson; 42d Va., Lieut.-Col. R. W. Withers, Capt. S. H. Saunders; 44th Va., Maj. N. Cobb, Capt. T. R. Buckner; 48th Va., Lieut.-Col. R. H. Dungan, Maj. Oscar White; 50th Va., Lieut.-Col. L. H. N. Salyer. Artillery, Maj. J. W. Latimer, Capt. C. I. Raine; 1st Md. Batt., Capt William F. Dement; Alleghany (Va.) Art., Capt. J. C. Carpenter; Chesapeake (Md.) Art., Capt. William D. Brown; Lee (Va.) Batt., Capt. C. I. Raine, Lieut. William W. Hardwicke. Rodes's division, Maj.-Gen. R.-E. Rodes:--Daniel's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Junius Daniel; 32d N. C., Col. E. C. Brabble; 43d N. C., Col. T. S. Kenan, Lieut.-Col. W. G. Lewis; 45th N. C., Lieut.-Col. S. H. Boyd, Maj. John R. Winston, Capt. A. H. Gallaway, Capt. J. A. Hopkins; 53d N. C., Col. W. A. Owens; 2d N. C. Battn., Lieut.-Col. H. L. Andrews, Capt. Van Brown. Doles's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Ge
the Potomac River, its ease or difficulty of access, had nothing to do with the location of the capital. The port of Annapolis in Chesapeake Bay was the port and harbor of Washington, as Havre was of Paris, and it was situated about the same distance from the capital as Havre was from Paris. That while the port of Annapolis was held, the whole country would have access to Washington in a most certain and easy manner, especially for the conveyance of troops, as the great bays Delaware and Chesapeake were in precise and easy connection with it. Chesapeake Bay and Hampton Roads would protect the fleets of the world, and it was not thought desirable among military men, in looking at the defence of a capital, to have it situated close upon the shores of large open seas where it would always be at the mercy of naval attacks and raids of troops by water. The very difficulty of getting up the Potomac, and the ease with which war vessels could be prevented from ascending the river, was one o
give a new Key to thy song, Maryland! My Maryland! Dear Mother! burst the tyrant's chain, Maryland! Virginia should not call in vain, Maryland! She meets her sisters on the plain-- “Sic semper,” 'tis the proud refrain, That baffles millions back amain, Maryland! Arise, in majesty again, Maryland! My Maryland! I see the blush upon thy cheek, Maryland! But thou wast ever bravely meek, Maryland! But lo! there surges forth a shriek From hill to hill, from creek to creek-- Potomac calls to Chesapeake, Maryland! My Maryland! Thou wilt not yield the Vandal toll, Maryland! Thou wilt not crook to his control, Maryland! Better the fire upon thee roll, Better the blade, the shot, the bowl, Than crucifixion of the soul, Maryland! My Maryland! I hear the distant thunder hum, Maryland! The Old Line's bugle, fife, and drum, Maryland! She is not dead, nor deaf, nor dumb-- Huzza! she spurns the Northern scum! She breathes — she burns! she'll come! she'll come! Maryland! My Maryland! R. --Cha<
Stalking with Liberty along, And chant thy dauntless slogan-song, Maryland, my Maryland! Dear Mother, burst the tyrant's chain, Maryland! Virginia should not call in vain, Maryland! She meets her sisters on the plain,— Sic semper! 'tis the proud refrain That baffles minions back amain, Maryland, my Maryland! I see the blush upon thy cheek, Maryland! For thou wast ever bravely meek, Maryland! But lo! there surges forth a shriek From hill to hill, from creek to creek,— Potomac calls to Chesapeake, Maryland, my Maryland! Thou wilt not yield the Vandal toll, Maryland! Thou wilt not crook to his control, Maryland! Better the fire upon thee roll, Better the blade, the shot, the bowl, Than crucifixion of the soul, Maryland, my Maryland! I hear the distant thunder-hum, Maryland! The Old Line's bugle, fife, and drum, Maryland! She is not dead, nor deaf, nor dumb; Huzza! she spurns the Northern scum! She breathes! she burns! she'll come! she'll come! Maryland, my Maryland! James Ryder
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
rveless hands drooped over the spotless shields, and with imperious love claims a fealty no less devoted in these days of peace. I claim no vision of seer or prophet, yet I fancy that even now I descry the faint dawn of that day, which thousands wait on with expectant eyes; when all this land, still the fairest on the globe — this land, which has known so long what old Isaiah termed the dimness of anguish --shall grow glad again in the broad sunlight of prosperity, and from Alleghany to Chesapeake shall resound the hum and stir of busy life; when yonder noble roadstead, where our iron-clad Virginia revolutionized the naval tactics of two continents, shall be whitened by many a foreign sail, and you, her children, shall tunnel those grand and hoary mountains, whose every pass Lee and old Stonewall have made forever historic by matchless skill and daring. Thus, comrades, assured of her heroic Past, stirred by a great hope for her Future, may we to-night reecho the cry of Richmond on
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alexandria, (search)
Washington. They were powerless, and were compelled to submit. The invader contented himself with burning one vessel and loading several others with plunder, for he became in too great a hurry to depart to wait for the hidden merchandise and the raising of the scuttled vessels. The squadron sailed down the Potomac, annoyed all the way by batteries and the militia on the shore, the former quickly constructed and armed with heavy guns from vessels sent by Commodore Rogers from Baltimore, and also others sent down from Washington. The British squadron, having an aggregate of 173 guns, passed out safely into Chesapeake peake Bay on Sept. 5. In the Civil War the city was occupied by National troops on May 25, 1861. and the same day Col. Ephraim Elmer ells worth (q. v.), commanding the 11th New York Volunteers (Fire Zouaves) was killed as he was descending from the roof of the Marshall House, where he had hauled down a Confederate flag, by James T. Jackson, the keeper of the hotel.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Canals. (search)
n safely speed. Canals in the United States. name.Cost.Completed.LengthLOCATION. in miles. Albemarle and Chesapeake$1,641,363186044Norfolk, Va., to Currituck Sound, N. C. Augusta1,500,00018479Savannah River, Ga., to Augusta, Ga. Black River3,581,954184935Rome, N. Y., to Lyons Falls, N. Y. Cayuga and Seneca 2,232,632183925Montezuma, N. Y., to Cayuga and Seneca Lakes, N. Y. Champlain 4,044,000182281Whitehall, N. Y., to Waterford. N. Y. Chesapeake and Delaware3,730,230182914Chesapeake City, Md., to Delaware City, Del. Chesapeake and Ohio11,290,3271850184Cumberland, Md., to Washington, D. C. Chicago Drainage. See next page. Companys 90,000184722Mississippi River, La., to Bayou Black, La. Delaware and Raritan 4,888,749183866New Brunswick, N. J., to Trenton, N. J. Delaware Division2,433,350183060Easton, Pa., to Bristol, Pa. Des Moines Rapids4,582,00918777 1-2At Des Moines Rapids, Mississippi River. Dismal Swamp2,800,000182222Connects Chesapeake Bay with Albemarle Sound.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
ed men killed and mortally wounded and 68 Enlisted men by disease. Total 209. 5th Pennsylvania Regiment Militia Infantry. Called September 4, 1862, to resist Lee's invasion of Maryland. Disbanded September 24. 1862. 6th Pennsylvania Regiment Infantry.--(3 months.) Organized at Harrisburg April 22, 1861. Moved to Philadelphia April 22, and duty there till May 7. Duty along Pittsburg, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad May 7-28. One Company at Newark, one Company at Chesapeake City, one Company at North East, one Company at Charleston, three Companies at Elkton and three Companies at Perryville. Moved to Chambersburg May 28. Attached to George H. Thomas' Brigade, 1st Division, Patterson's Army. March to Greencastle June 6. Cross Potomac and advance on Martinsburg Road June 15. At Williamsport June 16-24. At Downsville till July 1. Falling Waters July 2. Occupation of Martinsburg July 3. Advance on Bunker Hill July 15. Moved to Charles
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