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t of the delay necessary to catch them. Taking the route towards Frederick, we intercepted despatches from Colonel Rush (Lancers) to the commander of the scout, which satisfied me that our whereabouts was still a problem to the enemy. Before reaching Frederick, I crossed the Monocacy, and continued the march throughout the night, via Liberty, New Market, and Monrovia, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, where we cut the telegraph wires and obstructed the railroad. We reached at daylight Hyattstown, on McClellan's line of communication with Washington, but we found only a few waggons to capture, and pushed on to Barnesville, which we found just vacated by a company of the enemy's cavalry. We had here corroborated what we had heard before, that Stoneman had between four and five thousand troops about Poolesville and guarding the river fords. I started directly for Poolesville, but instead of marching upon that point, I avoided it by a march through the woods, leaving it two or three
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First cavalry. (search)
ard service in the battle of White Oak Swamp, it covered the retreat, at midnight, to the James river. It rendered good service at Malvern Hill, and cleared the road of teams on the following day, so that the artillery and ambulances could pass. A company of Rush's Lancers took its place at General Franklin's headquarters, at Harrison's Landing, when ordered to proceed with the regiment to join Burnside at Fredericksburg. It marched with that officer to Antietam, and won laurels at Hyattstown, Maryland, just before that battle, and at Williamsport, at its close, where several of its members were wounded by grapeshot while charging upon a battery. In Western Virginia, it made its mark among Imboden's men, helping to capture the camp of that bold partisan on two different occasions. In the Shenandoah Valley, under Milroy, it performed many bold deeds, in company with the regiment, while fighting against Mosby, Gilmore, and Imboden. Here Captain Boyd was promoted to the rank of majo
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 9: Second battle of Manassas. (search)
and urged it more than once. Halleck, the strategist of the Federal administration, differed from both Generals Lee and McClellan. Harper's Ferry was in his opinion the key to the upper door of the Federal capital, and should be held till the wings of the Peace Angel were spread over the republic. General Lee promptly planned to show that McClellan was right and Halleck wrong, though it involved a change of his original designs. His cavalry, under the vigilant Stuart, was at Urbana and Hyattstown, and well advanced on the road from Frederick to Washington, and every mile of McClellan's march was duly recorded and reported. The progress of this officer was so slow, his movements so cautious, that Lee determined to detach sufficient troops from his army to capture Harper's Ferry and Martinsburg, and bring them back in time to present a united front to McClellan. Daring, skill, celerity, and confidence were the qualifications of an officer to execute the movement. In Jackson they w
ives General Lee's despatches and orders. Winchester, Va., October 14. Hon. G. W. Randolph: The cavalry expedition to Pennsylvania has returned safe. They passed through Mercersburgh, Chambersburgh, Emmitsburgh, Liberty, New-Market, Hyattstown, and Barnesville. The expedition crossed the Potomac above Williamsport, and recrossed at White's Ford, making the entire circuit, cutting the enemy's communication, destroying arms, etc., and obtaining many recruits. R. E. Lee, General. heaefore reaching Frederick I crossed the Monocacy, continued the march through the night, via Liberty, New-Market, Monrovia, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, where we cut the telegraph-wires and obstructed the railroad. We reached at daylight Hyattstown, on McClellan's line of wagon communication with Washington, but we found only a few wagons to capture, and we pushed on to Barnsville, which we found just vacated by a company of the enemy's cavalry. We had here corroborated what we had heard
ton was concerned, the probable effects of an inroad in any form into Maryland rendered it necessary to be constantly on the alert and take every precaution to prevent a crossing of the river. As soon as Gen. Banks came under my command, Aug. 20, 1861, I directed him to cross to the eastern bank of the Monocacy, leaving one regiment to observe the Potomac above Harper's Ferry, and another to watch it from the latter place to the mouth of the Monocacy, and to put his main body not far from Hyattstown; thus placing him in position to oppose any attempt at crossing the river above Harper's Ferry, while his junction with the force at Washington would be secure of the enemy's crossing below the Monocacy. In his former position, at Sandy Hook, he was too far from Washington. He was ordered to move his surplus and heavy stores from Frederick to Baltimore or Washington, and his surplus transportation to the latter place; to oppose any passage of the Potomac by the enemy, provided it would n
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart's report of his cavalry expedition into Pennsylvania in October, 1862. (search)
d not admit of the delay necessary to catch them. Taking the road towards Frederick, we intercepted dispatches from Colonel Rush (lancers) to the commander of the scout, which satisfied me that our where-abouts was still a problem to the enemy. Before reaching Frederick I crossed the Monocacy, and continued the march through the night via Liberty, New Market and Monrovia, on Baltimore and Ohio railroad, where we cut the telegraph wires and obstructed the railroad. We reached at daylight Hyattstown, on McClellan's line of wagon communication with Washington; but we found only a few wagons to capture, and pushed on to Barnsville, which we found just vacated by a company of the enemy's cavalry. We had here corroborated what we had heard before — that Stoneman had between four and five thousand troops about Poolesville, and guarding the river fords. I started directly for Poolesville, but instead of marching upon that point I avoided it by a march through the woods, leaving it two or
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General J. E. B. Stuart of cavalry operations on First Maryland campaign, from August 30th to September 18th, 1862. (search)
the 12th of September, covering the front of the army then near Frederick city, in the direction of Washington. My left, consisting of Lee's brigade, rested at New Market, on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad; my centre, Hampton's brigade, near Hyattstown; and my right, Robertson's brigade, Colonel Munford commanding, in the direction of Poolesville, with one regiment (the Twelfth Virginia cavalry) at that point. The enemy having advanced upon my front, Hampton's brigade became engaged in several skirmishes near Hyattstown, driving the enemy back on every occasion; and on the 8th September, ascertaining that the enemy were about to occupy Poolesville, I ordered Colonel Munford to proceed to that point and drive them from the place. Munford's advance guard had just reached the town when the enemy appeared, with three regiments of cavalry and four pieces of artillery. Munford selected a position and opened fire with a Howitzer and Blakely, when the enemy also brought up two pieces a
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
there during the night. The Third Corps, commanded by Major-General Daniel E. Sickles, General Sickles resumed the command of the Third Corps, relieving General Birney, on the morning of the 28th of June. numbered 11,924 men; it was at Middletown. The Fifth Corps, lately General Meade's, now commanded by Major-General George Sykes, numbered 12,509 men; it was at Frederick City, Maryland. The Sixth Corps, commanded by Major-General John Sedgwick, numbered 15,--679 men; it was at Hyattstown, Maryland. The Eleventh Corps, commanded by Major-General Oliver O. Howard, numbered 9,893 men; it was, with the First and Third Corps, at Middletown. The Twelfth Corps, commanded by Major-General Henry W. Slocum, numbered 8,589 men; it arrived at 2 P. M., on the 28th, at Frederick City, from Knoxville, Maryland. The Artillery Reserve, commanded by Brigadier-General Robert O. Tyler, consisted of twenty-one batteries (108 guns) and 2,546 men; it was at Frederick City. The positions of the
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Maryland Volunteers. (search)
a., to January, 1865. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division Dept. West Virginia, to February, 1865. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division Dept. West Virginia, to June, 1865. Service. Leesburg, Va., September 2, 1862. Edwards' Ferry, Md., September 4. Monocacy Creek September 4. Reconnoissance to Lovettsville September 4. Maryland Heights and siege of Harper's Ferry September 12-14. Cut through enemy's lines September 14. Capture of Longstreet's train at Sharpsburg September 15. Hyattstown, Md., October 12. Charleston November 14. Berryville December 1. Charlestown December 2. Winchester December 5. Halltown December 20. Near Charlestown May 16, 1863. Berryville June 13. Martinsburg June 14. Winchester June 15 (Co. B ). Williamsport June 15. Catoctin Creek June 17. Frederick, Md., June 21. Sharpsburg July--.Fountain Dale, Pa., July 1. Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Near Emmittsburg July 4. Falling Waters July 6. Harper's Ferry Ju
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
. Harrison's Landing July 31. Stevensburg, Raccoon Ford and Brandy Station August 20. Cacapon Bridge, Md., September 6. Seneca Creek September 6. Hyattstown September 9-10. Frederick City September 12. Emmettsburg September 13-15. Antietam September 16-17. Williamsport September 19. Near Shepherdstownugust. Orange Court House August 14. Culpeper Road August 19. Barnett's Ford August 26. Kelly's Ford August 30. Williamsburg September 9. Near Hyattstown September 9-10. Frederick City September 12. South Mountain September 14. Antietam September 16-17. Lovettsville October 3. Reconnoissance to Smiat Bunker Hill July 17. Picket duty at Bolivar Heights July 25. Occupation of Maryland Heights July 28. Lovettsville August 8 (Detachment). Moved to Hyattstown August 16. Duty near Darnestown till September 24. Duty on Upper Potomac till December. Designation of Regiment changed to 3rd Regiment New York Light
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