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L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 8 0 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 8 4 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 18, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.75 (search)
passed, gave us the military salute of shouldered arms. They were noticeable, at that early stage of the war, as the only organization we saw that wore the regulation Confederate gray, all other troops having assumed a sort of revised regulation uniform of homespun butternut — a significant witness, we thought, to the efficacy of the blockade. From Winchester we were marched to Staunton, where we were put on board cattle-cars and forwarded at night, by way of Gordonsville, to Richmond, where we entered Libby Prison. We were not treated with special severity, for Libby was not at that time the hissing it afterward became. Our time there, also, was not long. Only nine days after we entered it we were sent away, going by steamer to Camp Parole, at Annapolis. From that place I went home without ceremony, reporting my address to my company officers. Three weeks afterward they advised me that I was exchanged — which meant that I was again, legally and technically, food for powd
m the counties of Ontario, Seneca, and Yates. It was under fire for the first time at Maryland Heights, where it received the main force of the enemy's attack, a large share of the casualties occurring in its ranks. During the fighting at Harper's Ferry it lost 13 killed and 42 wounded; total, 55. The regiment was surrendered two days after, together with the rest of the garrison at Harper's Ferry, and being paroled immediately was ordered to Chicago, Ill., where it spent two months in Camp Parole, awaiting notice of its exchange. Returning to Virginia, the winter of 1862-3 was passed in camp at Union Mills, Va. In June, 1863, it joined the Army of the Potomac, and was placed in Willard's Brigade, Alex. Hays's (3d) Division, Second Corps, with which it marched to Gettysburg, where the regiment won honorable distinction, capturing five stands of colors in that battle. Colonel Willard, the brigade commander, being killed there, Colonel Sherrill succeeded him, only to meet the same
nd be active and efficient, on the same fare that kills prisoners of war at a frightful per centage? I think not; no man can believe it; and while a practice so shocking to humanity is persisted in by the rebel authorities, I would very respectfully urge that retaliatory measures be at once instituted by subjecting the officers we now hold as prisoners of war to a similar treatment. I took advantage of the opportunity which this visit to Annapolis gave me to make a hasty inspection of Camp Parole, and I am happy to report that I found it in every branch in a most commendable condition. The men all seemed to be cheerful and in fine health, and the police inside and out was excellent. Colonel Root, the commanding officer, deserves much credit for the very satisfactory condition to which he has brought his command. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. Hoffman, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary General of Prisoners. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore), Interview with Stonewall Jackson. (search)
Interview with Stonewall Jackson. camp Parole, Annapolis, Md., January 6, 1863. dear sir: I will attempt, in accordance with your request, to give you an account of my interview with Stonewall Jackson, while a prisoner at his camp, and of my sojourn at Libby Prison in Richmond. A few days after my capture, I was sent to Jackson's camp, at Nineveh, Warren County, Va. I reached there Tuesday, November eleventh, in company with four others. Gen. Jackson came out of his tent just as we were leaving for the guard-house, (an old church near by,) and desired us to wait a few minutes, as he would like to ask us a few questions. When were you taken? he inquired. November seventh, I replied. Have you any New-York papers with you? he asked. I replied that we had not, but told him I had read the Herald of the fifth, which had reached camp on the day of my capture. Ah! Did you? said he. I wanted to inquire about the recent elections. Do you know what majority Seymour
865 Confederate currency had depreciated to such an extent that a man paid $400 to have a horse curried, as related by a Confederate veteran, and the exchanged Confederates returned whenever possible directly to their regiments in the field. soon ended. All the captured officers of General Pope's command were forwarded by Colonel Ould, September 24, 1862. Exchanges went on, and the prisons were practically empty for a time. The paroled Union soldiers in the East were sent chiefly to Camp Parole, at Annapolis. Often the officers had been separated from their men and did not report to the camp. Many were unwilling to resume army life and refused to do police or guard duty around their camp, on the ground that such duty was forbidden by their parole. In the West, many of the paroled prisoners were sent to Camp Chase, in Ohio. General Lew Wallace, who found three thousand paroled Union soldiers when he took command of the post, reported that there had never been such a thing a
24-November 4, thence to Glasgow, Ky., November 10. Action near Tompkinsville November 19. Moved to Hartsville, Tenn., November 28. Battle of Hartsville December 7. Regiment captured and paroled. Exchanged January 12, 1863. At Camp Parole, Columbus, Ohio, till March. Ordered to Lexington, Ky., March 24, thence to Frankfort, and duty there till May, operating against guerrillas. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., May 1-4, thence to Gallatin, Tenn., June, and guard duty along Louisdisease. Total 32. 144th Ohio Regiment Infantry. Organized at Camp Chase, Ohio, and mustered in May 11, 1864. Left State for Baltimore, Md., May 11. Companies assigned to duty as follows: G and K in the Defenses of Baltimore; B at Camp Parole, Annapolis, Md.; E at Wilmington, Del.; I at Fort Dix, Relay House. Balance of Regiment at Fort McHenry. Attached to 1st Separate Brigade, 8th Army Corps, Middle Department. Regiment relieved from duty at Baltimore and moved to Relay Hous
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
gade, 3rd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 6th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, and Army of the Shenandoah to June, 1865. Service. Guard and provost duty in East Maryland and at Camp Parole, Annapolis, Md., till February, 1863. Moved to Harper's Ferry, thence to Berryville. Duty on the Upper Potomac till June. Battle of Winchester, Va., June 13-15. Retreat to Harper's Ferry, W. Va. (Those captured paroled July 7 and dal 97. 212th Pennsylvania Regiment Volunteers. (See 6th Regiment Heavy Artillery.) 213th Pennsylvania Regiment Infantry. Organized at Philadelphia February 4 to March 2, 1865. Moved to Annapolis, Md., March 4. Guard duty at Camp Parole till April. Duty at Frederick, Md., and on line of Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. Ordered to Washington, D. C., and duty in northern defenses till November. Mustered out November 18, 1865. Regiment lost during service 18 by disease.
activity her adventures after the battle of Chancellorsville the field Hospital near United States Ford the forgetful surgeon Matron of Third Division, Third Corps Hospital, Gettysburg camp Letterman illness of Mrs. Husband stationed at camp Parole, Annapolis Hospital at brandy Station the battles of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania overwhelming labor at Fredericksburg, Port Royal, White House, and City Point Second Corps Hospital at City Point marching through Richmond hurrah for Camp Letterman. Here she was attacked with miasmatic fever, but struggled against it with all the energy of her nature, remaining for three weeks ill in her tent. She was at length carried home, but as soon as she was convalescent, went to Camp Parole at Annapolis, as agent of the Sanitary Commission, to fill the place of Miss Clara Davis, (now Mrs. Edward Abbott), who was prostrated by severe illness induced by her severe and continued labors. In December, 1863, she accepted the positio
d out, Why, this looks as if we were going to live, there's no grains of corn for a man to swallow whole in this loaf. Thus the words of cheer and hope came from almost every tongue, as they received their rations and walked away, each with his thank you, thank you; and sat down upon the ground, which forcibly reminded me of the Scripture account where the multitude sat down in companies, and did eat and were filled. Ambulances came afterwards to take those who were unable to walk to Camp Parole, which is two miles distant. One poor man, who was making his way behind all the rest to reach the ambulance, thought it would leave him, and with a most anxious and pitiful expression, cried out, Oh, wait for me I I think I shall never forget his look of distress. When he reached the wagon he was too feeble to step in, but Captain Davis, and Rev. J. A. Whitaker, Sanitary Commission agent, assisted him till he was placed by the side of his companions, who were not in much better conditio
d out, Why, this looks as if we were going to live, there's no grains of corn for a man to swallow whole in this loaf. Thus the words of cheer and hope came from almost every tongue, as they received their rations and walked away, each with his thank you, thank you; and sat down upon the ground, which forcibly reminded me of the Scripture account where the multitude sat down in companies, and did eat and were filled. Ambulances came afterwards to take those who were unable to walk to Camp Parole, which is two miles distant. One poor man, who was making his way behind all the rest to reach the ambulance, thought it would leave him, and with a most anxious and pitiful expression, cried out, Oh, wait for me I I think I shall never forget his look of distress. When he reached the wagon he was too feeble to step in, but Captain Davis, and Rev. J. A. Whitaker, Sanitary Commission agent, assisted him till he was placed by the side of his companions, who were not in much better conditio
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