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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 6 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 6 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 12: Gettysburg. (search)
ight. The army smallest in numbers had the longest or outside line, while the largest force occupied in its front a superb defensive position. Lee's army was practically concentrated on the night of the 1st, except his cavalry and Pickett's infantry division, Ewell and Hill in front of the enemy, and Longstreet in camp only four miles in the rear. Meade and his Second Corps were at Taneytown, in Maryland, when the sun went down on the 1st, thirteen miles distant; the Fifth Corps, at Union Mills, twenty-three miles distant and the Sixth Corps, sixteen thousand men, thought to be the largest and finest in the army, was at Manchester, thirty-four miles away. Both Meade and Lee would have preferred to postpone the battle a few days, but were face to face sooner than contemplated. Meade received Hancock's report on the evening of the 1st, and determined in consequence to fight the battle at Gettysburg, and issued orders for the movement of his troops at 7.30 P. M. that evening.
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 26: Gettysburg-First day. (search)
General Meade's Headquarters, Taneytown, fourteen miles. General Hunt, artillery reserve, Taneytown. First Corps, Marsh Run, six miles. Second Corps, Uniontown, twenty-two miles. Third Corps, Bridgeport, twelve miles. Fifth Corps, Union Mills, fifteen miles. Sixth Corps, Manchester, twenty-two miles. Eleventh Corps, Emmitsburg, twelve miles. Twelfth Corps, Littletown, nine miles. Kilpatrick's cavalry, Hanover, thirteen miles. Gregg's cavalry, Manchester, twenty-two miles.g; the Third Corps at Cashtown and Fayetteville; cavalry not in sight or hearing, except Jenkins's brigade and a small detachment. The Union army: the First Corps on Marsh Run, the Second at Uniontown, the Third at Bridgeport, the Fifth at Union Mills, the Sixth at Manchester, the Eleventh at Emmitsburg, the Twelfth at Littlestown, Fitzpatrick's cavalry at Hanover, Buford's at Gettysburg (except one brigade, detached, guarding his trains). General Meade's Headquarters and reserve artillery
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
dy crossed the river, he marched north by Rockville, where he captured a wagon train. Paroling his prisoners and taking the train with him, he pushed on — through Westminster, where he had a sharp action with a squadron of Delaware horse — to Union Mills, and encamped there on the 29th. During the night, he learned that the Federal army was still between him and Lee on its march north, and his scouts reported its cavalry in strong force at Littlestown, barring his direct road to Gettysburg; wear Rock Creek. On the night of June 30th Meade's headquarters and the Artillery Reserve were at Taneytown; the First Corps at Marsh Run, the Eleventh at Emmitsburg, Third at Bridgeport, Twelfth at Littlestown, Second at Uniontown, Fifth at Union Mills, Sixth and Gregg's cavalry at Manchester, Kilpatrick's at Hanover. A glance at the map [p. 266] will show at what disadvantage Meade's army was now placed. Lee's whole army was nearing Gettysburg, while Meade's was scattered over a wide regi
dvance will be given by the Commander-in-Chief. Second division. 2d. Brigadier-General Jones's brigade, supported by Colonel Early's brigade, will march via McLane's Ford, to place itself in position of attack on the enemy on or about the Union Mills and Centreville road. It will be held in readiness either to support the attack on Centreville, or to move in the direction of Fairfax Station, according to circumstances, with its right flank towards the left of Ewell's command, more or lessen by the Commander-in-Chief. Third division. 3d. Brigadier-General Longstreet's brigade, supported by Brigadier-General Jackson's brigade, will march via McLane's Ford, to place itself in position of attack upon the enemy on or about the Union Mills and Centreville road. It will be held in readiness either to support the attack on Centreville, or to move in the direction of Fairfax Court House, according to circumstances, with its right flank towards the left of Jones's command, more or
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
ssing the authorities with the belief that we were just at their heels. Here, for the first time since leaving Rector's cross-roads, we obtained a full supply of forage, but the delay and difficulty of procuring it kept many of the men up all night. Several flags and one piece of artillery, without a carriage, were captured here; the latter was spiked and left behind. We camped for the night a few miles beyond the town (Fitz. Lee's brigade in advance), halting the head of the column at Union Mills, midway between Westminister and Littlestown, on the Gettysburg road. It was ascertained here that night by scouts that the enemy's cavalry had reached Littlestown during the night and camped. Early next morning (June 30th) we resumed the march, direct by a cross route for Hanover, Pennsylvania--W. H, F. Lee's brigade in advance, Hampton in rear of the wagon train, and Fitz. Lee's brigade moving on the left flank between Littlestown and our road. About 10 A. M. the head of the column r
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
garding the movements of the enemy. The reports coming in from the front showed that the army was not in the immediate vicinity of the enemy. In fact, what little information was procurable rather confirmed the opinion that the enemy was still moving in the direction of Harrisburg. The order of march for June 30, issued at Middleburg on the 29th, directed the Twelfth Corps, passing the Third Corps, to move to Littlestown. The Fifth Corps was ordered to the crossing of Pipe Creek, at Union Mills, on the road between Littlestown and Westminster. The Sixth Corps was ordered to move to Manchester; the First Corps to the crossing of Marsh Creek, half-way to Gettysburg; the Artillery Reserve, following the Twelfth Corps, to the crossing of Piney Run, Not shown on map. by the road between Littlestown and Taneytown. The order of march for these corps was, in fact, nothing but continuing the execution of the plan of the previous day. It brought up the right flank to Manchester, the
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 30 (search)
Mechanicsville, to Middleburg, or, if a more direct route can be found, leaving Taneytown to their left, to withdraw direct to Middleburg. General Slocum will assume command of the two corps at Hanover and Two Taverns and withdraw them via Union Mills, deploying one to the right and one to the left after crossing Pipe creek, connecting on the left with General Reynolds, and communicating his right to General Sedgwick at Manchester, who will connect with him and form the right. The time f must be hauled out of the line, and not delay the movements. The trains ordered to Union Bridge, in these events will be sent to Westminster. General headquarters will be, in case of this movement, at Frizelburg. General Slocum as near Union Mills as the line will render best for him. General Reynolds at or near the road from Taneytown to Frizelburg. The chief of artillery will examine the line and select positions for artillery. The cavalry will be held on the right and left fla
organization, with the following headquarters: 1ST brigade, Brigadier-General M. L. Bonham, at Centreville. 2D brigade, Brigadier-General Ewell, at or about Union Mills, in advance. 3D brigade, Brigadier-General D. R. Jones, at a position on Union Mills and Centreville road, about half-way between Braddock's road and Union MUnion Mills and Centreville road, about half-way between Braddock's road and Union Mills Ford. 4TH brigade, Brigadier-General Longstreet, at or about the crossing of the Centreville and Union Mills road and the Braddock's road. 5TH brigade, Colonel Cocke, at or about suspension bridge, over Cub Run. 6TH brigade, Colonel Early, in position on Bull Run, one mile above Stone Bridge. Evans's command, at orUnion Mills road and the Braddock's road. 5TH brigade, Colonel Cocke, at or about suspension bridge, over Cub Run. 6TH brigade, Colonel Early, in position on Bull Run, one mile above Stone Bridge. Evans's command, at or about Stone Bridge, except Hunton's regiment Virginia Volunteers, which will remain at these headquarters for the present. Colonel Radford will concentrate such of his companies as are not specially detached, at a point on Bull Run to the left of Mitchell's Ford. The commanders of all regiments will take immediate measures f