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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 68 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 52 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 46 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 45 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Westminster (Maryland, United States) or search for Westminster (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
e 10th, the date of Hooker's proposal to march on Richmond, concurring in General Lee's views. Note.--in considering the comparative value of Gettysburg and Westminster (behind Pipe Creek) to Lee and Meade, the maps, above, should make more of the mountain Ridge, west of the Monocacy, and defined in general by point of rocks, Fairfield, and Cashtown; and there should be represented on the maps the lesser range called Parr's Ridge, east of Pipe Creek, at the foot of which lie Westminster and Manchester.--editors. He considered aggressive action indispensable, that all attendant risks and sacrifices must be incurred, and adds, I have not hesitated, incrossed the river, he marched north by Rockville, where he captured a wagon train. Paroling his prisoners and taking the train with him, he pushed on — through Westminster, where he had a sharp action with a squadron of Delaware horse — to Union Mills, and encamped there on the 29th. During the night, he learned that the Federal
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.42 (search)
ll show that such a line would cover Baltimore and Washington in all directions from which Lee could advance, and that Westminster, his base, would be immediately behind him, with short railroad communication to Baltimore. It would, moreover, save ing, and restore to the ranks the thousands of stragglers who did not reach Gettysburg in time for the battle. From Westminster — which is in Parr's Ridge, the eastern boundary of the valley of the Monocacy — good roads led in all directions, andult, that he was too far east, that Lee might attempt to turn his left, and that Frederick was preferable as a base to Westminster, may have confirmed Meade in this decision. In pursuance of his instructions, I had that morning (July 1st) reconnory, except Merritt's brigade (then at Emmitsburg), was near Round Top, from which point it was ordered that morning to Westminster, thus uncovering our left flank; Kilpatrick's and Gregg's divisions were well out on the right flank, from which, afte
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Lee's right wing at Gettysburg. (search)
n a strategic view, are you not too far east, and may not Lee attempt to turn your left and cut you off from Frederick? Please give your full attention to this suggestion . . . The next day, just thirty minutes before my assault, General Meade telegraphed General Halleck at 3 P. M.: . . . If I find it hazardous to do so [meaning to attack], or am satisfied that the enemy is endeavoring to move to my rear and interpose between me and Washington, I shall fall back to my supplies at Westminster. . . . From this we know that the ground of the Gettysburg cemetery could have been occupied without the loss of a man, yet even at this late day, some of the Virginians, not satisfied with the sacrifice already made, wish that I, who would and could have saved every man lost at Gettysburg, should now be shot to death. If we had made the move around the Federal left, and taken a strong position, we should have dislodged Meade without a single blow; but even if we had been successf
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The cavalry battle near Gettysburg. (search)
pplied with a scanty allowance of rations and forage. Five o'clock found it on the march for Westminster, with the 3d Pennsylvania of McIntosh's brigade in advance. Having been on almost continuousng the men to grow impatient and the officers to become irritable.--W. E. M. Our march to Westminster was one of unusual severity, for the night was very dark and both men and horses were worn oues, pounding their heads, and pricking themselves with pins. When within about five miles of Westminster it Brevet Major-General D. McM. Gregg. From a photograph. was discovered that the left ofon the 30th the advance, under Captain Charles Treichel, of the 3d Pennsylvania, charged into Westminster and captured a lot of Stuart's stragglers. Here we met with a cordial reception. The majorid carrying their saddles in the hope of procuring remounts. The above report was made out at Westminster. Our march from there through the broiling sun and clouds of dust entailed a still larger lo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.58 (search)
as I have already said, did not like Gettysburg as a battle-field and wanted to get away from it. Hence we can understand, and in another way, the withdrawal of Geary and Buford from the left and his failure to send timely reenforcements to the almost uncovered left flank. At 3 o'clock in the afternoon of July 2d, a few moments before Longstreet opened his assault, Meade telegraphed to Halleck: If satisfied the enemy is endeavoring to move to my rear, I shall fall back to my supplies at Westminster. He had already sent Buford there, two hours before. General Meade's chief-of-cavalry, Major-General Alfred Pleasonton, states that in the afternoon of the 2d of July General Meade gave me the order to get what cavalry and artillery I could as soon as possible, and take up a position in the rear to cover the retreat of the army from Gettysburg. I was thus occupied until 10 o'clock at night, when I was recalled by an order from General Meade. Meanwhile, although General Meade had no
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. (search)
ohn P. Taylor; 3d Pa., Lieut.-Col. E. S. Jones; Section Battery H, 3d Pa. Art'y, Captain William D. Rank. Brigade loss: w, 26; m, 9 = 35. Second Brigade, At Westminster, etc., and not engaged in the battle. Col. Pennock Huey: 2d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Otto Harhaus; 4th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Augustus Pruyn; 6th Ohio, Maj. William Stedm and F, Pa., Capt. James Thompson (w). Brigade loss: k, 16; w, 71; m, 6 == 93. Second Volunteer Brigade, Capt. Elijah D. Taft: B, 1st Conn., At Taneytown and Westminster, and not engaged in the battle. Capt. Albert F. Brooker; M, 1st Conn., At Taneytown and Westminster, and not engaged in the battle. Capt. Franklin A. Pratt; Westminster, and not engaged in the battle. Capt. Franklin A. Pratt; 2d Conn., Capt. John W. Sterling; 5th N. Y., Capt. Elijah D. Taft. Brigade loss: k, 1; w, 5; mi, 2 = 8. Third Volunteer Brigade, Capt. James F. Huntington: 1st N. H., Capt. Frederick M. Edgell; H, 1st Ohio, Lieut. George W. Norton; F and G, 1st Pa., Capt. R. Bruce Ricketts; C, W. Va., Capt. Wallace Hill. Brigade loss: k, 10; w, 2