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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Death of General John H. Morgan. (search)
rces engaged on the Union side were the Thirteenth Tennessee Cavalry, Colonel Miller; Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, Colonel Brownlow, and Tenth Michigan, Major Newell. So complete was the surprise and rout of Morgan's command that the Federal loss was but two killed and four wounded. Morgan's body was carried on a horse about one mile, where it was laid by the roadside, and afterward turned over to some of Morgan's friends, who came for it with a flag of truce. The body was carried to Abington, Virginia, and buried, and soon after removed to Richmond. Whatever became of Campbell I do not know. He is marked on the muster rolls as having moved to Ohio. Immediately after the victory, he was promoted to second lieutenant in Company E, same regiment, by General Order No. 95, which states that the promotion is made as a reward for his gallantry in the engagement at Greenville, Tennessee, on the 4th instant, and for his success in arresting, by an accurate shot, the flight of General John
August 27. John B. Floyd, a General in the rebel service, died at Abington, Virginia.--A portion of Colonel Wilder's cavalry, belonging to the army of the Cumberland, encountered a rebel force at Hanover, Ala., and succeeded in defeating them, killing three, and capturing one.--A Government train of twenty-eight wagons was captured by a party of rebel guerrillas, at a point about six miles from Philippi, on the road to Beverly, Va.--the battle at Bayou Metea, Ark., between a large infantry and cavalry force of rebels, and General Davidson's division of National cavalry, took place this day.--(Doc. 156.)
ebels making stands on all the hills, but they were driven from their positions and retreated through Blountsville at dark, toward Zollicoffer, on the East-Tennessee and Virginia railroad. Night coming on, we encamped near Blountsville for the night. The rebels becoming alarmed, evacuated their stronghold, Zollicoffer, during the night, and retreated toward Saltville, evidently thinking we were making for the Salt Works at that place. Our troops followed them up to within six miles of Abington, Va., when they returned to Bristol. We captured here three locomotives and thirty-four cars, all of which we destroyed, as well as five railroad bridges above Bristol. We also captured a large amount of salt, sugar, etc. The rebels had thrown down the fences in the vicinity of Blountsville, and thrown up breastworks, and boasted that they intended to give the Yanks a good thrashing, and drive them from East-Tennessee; but, as usual, instead of their doing it, they did the tallest kind o
, shot in the arm; Thomas Royce, Company E, from Lamoille, shot in the shoulder; W. Evans, Company E, from Polo, shot in the leg; David Kitchen, Company E. from Abington, shot in the hip; Prince G. Rigsley, Company E, from Abington, shot in the side and through the hip; Albert Kaufman, Company E, from Princeton, shot with buckshog; David Kitchen, Company E. from Abington, shot in the hip; Prince G. Rigsley, Company E, from Abington, shot in the side and through the hip; Albert Kaufman, Company E, from Princeton, shot with buckshot in the head, breast, and arm; A. C. Miller, Company K, from Abington, shot through the arm, and escaped back to Pilot Knob. g; David Kitchen, Company E. from Abington, shot in the hip; Prince G. Rigsley, Company E, from Abington, shot in the side and through the hip; Albert Kaufman, Company E, from Princeton, shot with buckshot in the head, breast, and arm; A. C. Miller, Company K, from Abington, shot through the arm, and escaped back to Pilot Knob.
a son of Edward Blackburn of Woodford County, and a brother-in-law of Thompson Flournoy, of Arkansas, in which State he has himself resided for several years. We have no doubt that the devilish and murderous spirit exhibited by the latter are shared by most of the renegades who have lifted their traitor hands against their native State, and all hesitating Union men may see from it what they have to expect if they shall ever be placed at the mercy of such men our quondam acquaintance: Abington, Va., Oct. 2, 1861. my dear wife: I have left you and our children in the land of the despot, but God grant that I may soon be able to make the Union men of Kentucky feel the edge of my knife. From this day I hold every Union traitor as my enemy, and from him I scorn to receive quarter, and to him I will never grant my soul in death, for they are cowards and villains enough. Brother Henry and I arrived here without hindrance. I have had chills all the way, but I hope to live to kill fo
. H, Forty-second Regiment, slightly in the elbow. Henry Forney, Co. C, Forty-second Regiment, very slightly. Frank Miller, Co. A, Fortieth Regiment, in the foot, slightly. Second Lieut. Thos. Lilley, Co. A, Fortieth Regiment, severely in the arm. James W. Rose, Co. B, Fourteenth Kentucky Regiment, in thigh, badly. W. Chapman, Co. E, Twenty-second Kentucky, slightly in the neck. Alexander Bell, Twenty-second Kentucky, severely in arm. The enemy is in full retreat toward Abington, Va. Our men are too much exhausted to follow. The Big Sandy Valley is effectually cleared of rebels. Colonel Garfield's address. The following address to the citizens of the Sandy Valley, was issued by Col. Garfield, after he had driven off Humphrey Marshall: headquarters Eighteenth brigade, Paintsville, Ky., Jan. 16, 1862. Citizens of the Sandy Valley: I have come among you to restore the honor of the Union, and to bring back the Old Banner which you all once loved, but w
ine of the railroad from Memphis, Tenn., to Chattanooga, and from thence on one railroad branch to Charleston, S. C., and on one other branch to Richmond, Va.; occupying between Memphis and Chattanooga important intermediate points, say Grand Junction, Corinth, Decatur, and Stevenson. Between Chattanooga and Charleston I would occupy, say, Dalton, Atlanta, Union Point, Augusta, Branchville, and, possibly, Columbia, S. C. Between Chattanooga and Richmond 1 would occupy, say, Knoxville, Abington, Wytheville, Lynchburgh, Charlottesville, Burksville; and Richmond and Fredericksburgh should also be occupied. Just as soon as the points indicated are recovered from the enemy they should permanently be occupied by a military force. The important strategic points, such as Chattanooga, Memphis, and Richmond, should be strongly fortified without delay. I have thus, in a brief manner, stated what I consider the best disposition to be made in a military point of view. Considered polit
Doc. 141.-patriotic contributions to May 7, 1861. Albany, N. Y.$46,000 Auburn, N. Y.4,000 Abington, Mass.5,000 Amesbury, Mass.5,000 Acton, Mass.5,000 Boston, Mass.186,000 Brooklyn, N. Y.75,000 Bridgeport, Ct.31,000 Burlington, Vt.3,000 Bath, Mo.10,000 Batavia, N. Y.4,000 Buffalo, N. Y.110,000 Burlington, N. J.$4.000 Bordentown, N. J.8,000 Bradford, Vt.2,000 Bridgetown, N. J.1,000 Bedford, Mass.2,000 Bennington, Vt.10,000 Barre, Mass.2,000 Braintree, Mass.2,000 Bedford, N. Y.1,000 Brunswick, Me.1,000 Binghamton, N. Y.10,000 Connecticut, State.2,000,000 Cincinnati$280,000 Charlestown, Mass.10,000 Chicago, Ill.20,000 Circleville, Ohio.2,000 Clinton, Ill.5,000 Cohasset, Mass.1,000 Clinton, N. Y.1,000 Concord, Mass.4,000 Concord, N. H.10,000 Canandaigua, N. Y.7,000 Canton, Mass.5,000 Cass County, Ind.6,000 Cam. & Am. R. R. Co.10,000 Detroit, Mich.50,000 Dunkirk, N. Y.20,000 Dover, N. H.10,000 Damariscotta, Me.3,000 Elizabeth, N. J.11,000
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Kentucky Volunteers. (search)
0-October 17. Saltsville, Va., October 2. Sandy Mountain October 3. Stoneman's Raid into Southwest Virginia December 10-29. Bristol December 14. Abington, Va., December 15. Marion, Va., December 16. Near Marion December 17-18. Capture of Saltsville, Va., December 20-21. Jonesboro December 23. Clinch Ri Virginia September 20-October 17. Saltsville October 2. Stoneman's Expedition into Southwest Virginia December 10-29. Bristol, Tenn., December 13. Abington, Va., December 15. Near Marion, Va., December 17-18. Saltsville, Va., December 20-21. Capture and destruction of salt works. Duty in the Sandy Valley anirginia September 20-October 17. Action at Saltsville October 2. Stoneman's Raid into Southwest Virginia December 10-29. Briston, Va., December 13. Abington, Va., December 15. Near Marion December 17-18. Saltsville December 20-21. Capture and destruction of salt works. Mustered out Companies A, B, C, D, E an
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Michigan Volunteers. (search)
Regiment complimented by Gen. Burbridge for gallant conduct in cutting its way through greatly superior numbers when completely surrounded by the forces of Gen. Cerro Gordo Williams. Operations against guerrillas near Mount Sterling till November 17. Moved to Crab Orchard November 17-20, thence to Cumberland Gap, Tenn. Scout to Morristown December 1-4. Stoneman's Raid to Southwest Virginia December 10-29. Paperville and Kingsport December 13. Bristol December 14. Abington, Va., December 15. Wytheville December 16. Marion December 17-18. Saltsville December 20-21. Duty at Lexington, Ky., till February 23, 1865. Moved to Knoxville, Tenn., February 23-March 15. Stoneman's Expedition from East Tennessee in Southwet Virginia and Western North Carolina March 21-April 25. Boone N. C., March 28. Danbury, N. C., April 9. Shallow Ford and near Mocksville April 11. Salisbury April 12. Catawba River, near Morgantown, April 17. Blue Ridg
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