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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
nd dollars to our cause. George Blake, of Boston, (though opposed to the abolitionists), said that our fundamental principles were incontrovertible; that slavery could not long continue in our land; that it stood on the same level with the Genthoo sacrifices; and that he did not believe a man, or any body of men, could be found in that assembly, who would dare to propose any law, or any resolutions, censuring the antislavery society, or any other. Mr. Rantoul of Gloucester, Mr. Foster of Brimfield, Mr. Hillard of Boston, Mr. Longley of Festus Foster. Thomas Longley. Joshua H. Ward. Gilbert H. Durfee. [Hawley], all spoke in favor of our rights; also, Mr. Ward of Danvers, and Mr. Durfee of Fall River. Mr. Durfee said he was proud to acknowledge himself as one of the proscribed abolitionists, and he thanked God that he stood where he could vindicate his own rights and the rights of others. A motion was now made to lay our memorial upon the table—ayes 204, noes 216. It was then ref