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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hudson River, discovery of the. (search)
ee, five, three, and two fathomes and an halfe. And then three, foure, five, sixe, seven, eight, nine and ten fathomes. And by twelve of the clocke we were cleere of all the inlet. Then we took in our boat, and set our mayne-sayle, and sprit-sayle, and our topsayles, and steered away east south-east, and south-east by east off into the mayne sea: and the land on the souther side of the bay or inlet did beare at noone west and by south foure leagues from us. The fifth was faire weather, and the wind variable betweene the north and the east. Wee held on our course south-east by east. At noone I observed and found our height to bee 39 degrees, 30 minutes. Our compasse varied sixe degrees to the west. We continued our course toward England, without seeing any land by the way, all the rest of this moneth of October: and on the seventh day of November, stilo novo, being Saturday, by the grace of God we safely arrived in the range of Dartmouth, in Devonshire, in the yeere 1609.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Revolutionary War, (search)
ls of Parliament, and refuses to negotiate with Great Britain until her fleets and armies are withdrawn and she acknowledges the independence of the coloniesAug. 11, 1778 Gen. Charles Lee by court-martial for disobedience, misbehavior, and disrespect to Washington, suspended from command for one year Aug. 12, 1778 Battle of Rhode Island Aug. 29, 1778 Americans evacuate Rhode Island, Aug. 30, and British occupy Newport Aug. 31, 1778 British under General Grey burn Bedford village, in Dartmouth, Mass., and seventy American vessels lying at the wharfs Sept. 5, 1778 Benjamin Franklin appointed minister to the Court of France Sept. 14, 1778 Massacre by Indians and Tories at Cherry Valley, N. Y. Nov. 10, 1778 British troops under Howe capture Savannah; the Americans retreat across the Savannah River Dec. 29, 1778 Northern American army hutted in cantonments from Danbury, Conn., to Elizabethtown, N. J., for the winter1778-79 Maj.-Gen. Benjamin Lincoln, commanding the Southern forces,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Hampshire, (search)
57; scattering, 1,015......November, 1896 Vote for governor: Frank W. Rollins, Republican, 44,730; Charles F. Stone, Democrat, 35,653; Augustus G. Stevens, Prohibition, 1,333; scattering, 749......November, 1898 Ex-Gov. Frederick Smith dies......April 22, 1899 Old Home Week first celebrated in fifty cities and towns......August, 1899 Seventy towns celebrate Old Home Week......August, 1900 Joint presentation of bronze tablets to battle-ships Kearsarge and Alabama by people of New Hampshire, Governor Johnston and staff, of Alabama, attending, at Portsmouth......September, 1900 Vote for governor: Chester B. Jordan, Republican, 53,891; Frederick E. Potter, Democrat, 34,956; Josiah M. Fletcher, Prohibition, 1,182; scattering, 764......November, 1900 One hundred towns celebrate Old Home Week......August, 1901 Centennial anniversary of the graduation of Daniel Webster from Dartmouth celebrated by the college and State at Hanover......September, 1901 New Jersey
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 3: Holmes (search)
the study and my kind-hearted old father-not so old or so white-haired as I am now, at that time — so vividly as your story. ... Once more — twice more, if I have already written, I thank you. Faithfully yours, O. W. Holmes. Dr. Holmes was born, it will be remembered, August 29, 1809, graduated at Harvard in 1829, studied law for a year and a half, then studied medicine in Europe for two years and a half, took his degree at the Harvard Medical School in 1836, became Professor at Dartmouth in 1838, and Professor at the Harvard Medical School in 1847. He was thus away from Cambridge during most of my boyhood, and my memory first depicts him vividly when he came back to give his Phi Beta Kappa poem in 1836. He was at this time a young physician of great promise, which was thought to be rather impaired by his amusing himself with poetry. So at least, he always thought; and he cautioned in later years a younger physician, Dr. Weir Mitchell, to avoid the fault which he had com
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
e have not been able to ascertain: we know, however, that they realized upwards of one hundred dollars at one time, by means of a Soldiers' Fair held by them. Dartmouth Incorporated June 8, 1664. Population in 1860, 3,883; in 1865, 3,434. Valuation in 1860, $2,948,785; in 1865, $2,434,270. The selectmen in 1861 were Jire liberty, therefore— Resolved, That as patriots, and friends of the Constitution and the National Government and our righteous institutions, we, the people of Dartmouth, in town-meeting assembled, do recognize to the full extent the perilous position of our once happy, but now belligerent and distracted country, and also the dut83; in 1865, $1,700.00. Total amount in five years, $9,347.01. We have been unable to get a satisfactory statement, one that would do justice to the ladies of Dartmouth for their good works during the war; but we have a general statement, which is highly honorable to them. Dighton Incorporated May 30, 1712. Population in
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 8 (search)
at Gottingen. These reporters had sent back the daring assertion that while our cisatlantic schools and colleges had nothing to learn from England,--not even from the Oxford and Cambridge of that day,--they had, on the contrary, everything to learn from the German institutions. The students in question were Cogswell, Everett, Ticknor, and, in a less degree, Bancroft. Three of these went from Harvard College, Everett and Bancroft at the expense of the university; while Ticknor went from Dartmouth. They all brought back to Harvard what they could not find in England, but had gained in Germany; Everett writing to my father in a letter which lies before me (dated June 6, 1818), There is more teaching and more learning in our American Cambridge than there is in Oxford and Cambridge put together. They laid the foundation for non-English training not only in Boston, but in America, at a time when the very best literary journal in New York, and indeed in this country, was called The Alb
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter 1: Cambridge and Newburyport (search)
hmidt-doesn't it look prettier? --while he dates the letter as so many days from the beginning of his life --all which is very satisfactory; and they are to stay at Northampton till June and then sail for Europe. Also she is said not to be so rich as has been supposed, and she always expects to sing in public more or less because she would not think it right not to use her power. March, 1851 I don't know if I have mentioned my principal crony this winter--Professor Crosby, formerly of Dartmouth. You know, perhaps, his history; how he wrote a most admirable and pungent letter to the American Tract Society against endless punishment, and lost his professorship thereby. He is a man of great variety of knowledge and thought, clear, pertinacious, hard-headed, amiable, mild, but without much sentiment; and I have enjoyed him, though Mary compares him to sawdust and all kinds of dry and gritty particles. . .. He has a taste for heretics and comes to see me constantly. These jotti
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 6: the Cambridge group (search)
the older faith. On his graduation from Harvard in 1829, Holmes, like so many other men of literary tastes at that time, turned first toward the bar. After studying for a year and a half, however, he decided that the law was not for him. As the ministry was uncongenial, only one of the three learned professions then considered respectable remained open to him. He studied medicine in Europe for two years and a half, took his degree at the Harvard Medical School in 1836, became Professor at Dartmouth in 1838, and Professor at the Harvard Medical School in 1847. He was thus away from Cambridge during most of my boyhood, and my memory first depicts him vividly when he came back to give his Phi Beta Kappa poem in 1836. He was at this time a young physician of great promise, which was thought to be rather impaired by his amusing himself with poetry. So, at least, he always thought; and he cautioned in later years a younger physician, Dr. Weir Mitchell, to avoid the fault which he had a
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
udied law. His published works include The progress of Dulness (1772-74) ; an Elegy on the times (1774); his famous McFingal, a modern Epic poem (1774-82). He was associated with the Hartford wits in the production of The Anarchiad (1786-87), and was judge of the superior court from 1801 until 1819. The poetical works of John Trumbull were published in 1820. Died in Detroit, Mich., May 10, 1831. Webster, Daniel Born in Salisbury (now Franklin), N. H., Jan. 18, 1782. Graduating from Dartmouth in 1801, he studied law, was admitted to the bar, and was unsurpassed as a lawyer and orator. He became U. S. representative from New Hampshire and later from Massachusetts, and in 1827 was made U. S. Senator from the latter state. Some of the best known of his public orations are those on the Bunker Hill monument, on the Pilgrim anniversary, and the eulogium on Jefferson and Adams. His most celebrated political speech is his Reply to Hayne. A collection of his Works appeared in 1851,
Historic leaves, volume 8, April, 1909 - January, 1910, Report of the Committee on Necrology. (search)
al Society, Mr. Snow belonged to John Abbot Lodge, A. F. and A. M., Oasis Lodge, I. O. O. F., and Wonohaquaham Tribe of Red Men. He was also a member of the Massachusetts Truant Officers' Association. He left a widow. Quincy E. Dickerman. (Acknowledgments to the Somerville Journal.) Quincy E. Dickerman was born in Stoughton July 15, 1828. He was educated in the Stoughton schools and the Bridgewater Normal School. Before graduation he had charge of a winter school in the town of Dartmouth. Later he taught at Chilmark on Martha's Vineyard, at Fairhaven, and at Sharon. Then he went to Phillips Andover Academy to fit for college. But he spent only a short time there, for the school committee of Stoughton called him to teach in his home town. Here he continued at work until he came to Boston in 1856. Besides his duties as principal of the grammar school, he was elected a member of the school board of Stoughton, and later was secretary, and then chairman of the school commi
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