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. Knox, slightly, neck, Holden; D. B. Bigelow, flesh, leg, Worcester. Co. B, Edwin F. Pond, wrist, Milford. Co. C, Corporal J. P. Burke, head, Boston; A. D. Condon, seriously, South-Boston; Wm. Chafee; Worcester; Chas. Conklin, seriously, Hopkinton; Geo. J. Fayerweather, Westboro; Edward R. Graton, seriously, Leicester; A. H. Holman, North-Brookfield; Samuel Hall, groin, Uxbridge; J. A. McKinstry, Southbridge; T. N. Magee, Douglas; Cyprian K. Stratton, Worcester; G. W. Williams, SouthboroWheeler, do., Royalton; S. F. Jillson, thigh; A. N. Cobleigh, leg. Co. K, Samuel Thurston, leg, Worcester; Edwin F. Pratt, leg, Holden; Frank S. Sibley, leg, Auburn. Missing. Co. A, George F. Robinson, Worcester. Co. B, D. H. Eames, Hopkinton. Co. C, Corporal Samuel Healy, Boston; W. C. Hemmenway, West--Boyleston; W. C. Hardy, Worcester; Horace Merriam, Warren; Lewis Wright, do. Co. E, Jas. Gordon, Worcester; Frank Smith, do.; Joseph Tibault, do. Co. K, B. F. Mills, Worcest
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Knapp, Samuel Lorenzo 1783-1838 (search)
Knapp, Samuel Lorenzo 1783-1838 Author; born in Newburyport, Mass., Jan. 19, 1783; graduated at Dartmouth College in 1804; became a lawyer; and was a commander on the coast defences in the War of 1812. His publications include Travels in North-America by Ali Bey; Memoirs of General Lafayette; American biography; History of the United States (a revision of John Hinton's edition); Memoir of the life of Daniel Webster; Life of Aaron Burr; Life of Andrew Jackson, etc. He also edited The Library of American history. He died in Hopkinton, Mass., July 8, 1838.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Shays, Daniel 1747-1825 (search)
Shays, Daniel 1747-1825 Insurgent; born in Hopkinton, Mass., in 1747; was an ensign in Woodbridge's regiment at the battle of Bunker Hill, and became a captain in the Continental army. His place in history was obtained by his leadership of an insurrection in Massachusetts in 1786-87. In other portions of the Union, discontents like those which produced the State of Frankland (q. v. ) caused revolutionary movements. A convention of the people of Maine, sitting in Portland (September, 1786), considered the expediency of erecting themselves into an independent State, but nothing came of it. In Massachusetts a more formidable movement took place. The General Court had voted customs and excise duties to produce a revenue sufficient to meet the interest on the State. debt. Besides this burden laid upon them, the people were suffering from private indebtedness. There were taxes to meet the instalments to be paid on the principal of the State debt, and, also, responses had to be
nd purple were regal, and red is yet a cardinal color. The Etruscan augurs wore jack-boots. The Lamas of Tartary wear red boots and yellow cloaks. They leave their boots in the vestibules of the temples. So do the Turks. The latter brought the practice from Central Asia. There bought a pair of boots; cost me 30 s. — Pepys, 1662. The boot and shoe making business, more particularly since the introduction of pegs, which are said to have been invented by Joseph Walker, of Hopkinton, Mass., about the year 1818, has become a very extensive and important branch of manufacture, machinery being employed in nearly all the operations connected with the business. The first application of machinery in shoemaking is due to the celebrated Brunel, who devised a series of machines, which were operated by invalid soldiers belonging to Chelsea Hospital. The shoe passed through a number of hands before being finished; the operation which each man had to perform was so simple that it i
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
g the entire war. The money value of their contributions was more than thirty-five hundred dollars. A balance of forty dollars remained in their hands at the end of the war, which was given to embellish the grounds of the soldiers' monument. Hopkinton Incorporated Dec. 13, 1715. Population in 1860, 4,340; in 1865, 4,140. Valuation in 1860, $1,368,099; in 1865, $1,595,257. The selectmen in 1861 were Nathan P. Coburn, Eliakim A. Bates, David Eames, Otis L. Woods; in 1862, 1863, and 186 1865. April 11th, Voted, to pay one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of the town for three years service, to continue until March 1st, 1865. It was also voted to pay the same bounty to drafted men. Hopkinton furnished four hundred and twenty-five men for the war, which was a surplus of sixteen over and above all demands. Three were commissioned officers. The total amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclus
ter 191 Goshen 341 Gosnold 168 Grafton 630 Granby 342 Granville 302 Great Barrington 74 Greenfield 266 Greenwich 343 Groton 408 Groveland 194 H. Hadley 345 Halifax 546 Hamilton 196 Hancock 77 Hanover 550 Hanson 547 Hardwick 631 Harvard 633 Harwich 41 Hatfield 346 Hawley 268 Haverhill 198 Heath 269 Hingham 551 Hinsdale 79 Holden 635 Holland 303 Holliston 410 Holyoke 305 Hopkinton 412 Hubbardston 636 Hull 553 Huntington 348 I. Ipswich 202 K. Kingston 554 L. Lakeville 556 Lancaster 638 Lanesborough 80 Lawrence 202 Lee 81 Leicester 639 Leominster 642 Lenox 84 Leverett 271 Lexington 414 Leyden 272 Littleton 419 Lincoln 416 Longmeadow 307 Lowell 420 Ludlow 308 Lunenburg 644 Lynn 207 Lynnfield 212 M. Malden 425 Manchester 213 Mansfield 139 Marblehea
in his Historical Collections of the Indians in New England, printed in the first volume of Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Besides Natick, the most important of all, there were six communities in Massachusetts, exclusive of Plymouth, which had long been denominated praying towns; namely, Pakemitt, or Punkapaog (now Stoughton); Hassanamesitt, or Hassanamisco (Grafton); Okommakamesit (Marlborough); Wamesit, or Pawtuckett (Tewksbury); Nashobah (Littleton); Magunkaquog (Hopkinton). There were also seven new praying towns, where the Gospel had been favorably received about three years: Manchage (Oxford); Chabanakongkomun (Dudley); Maanexit (north part of Woodstock, at that time included in Massachusetts); Quantisset (southeast part of Woodstock); Wabquissit (southwest part of Woodstock); Packachoog (south part of Worcester); Waeuntug (Uxbridge). There are two other Indian towns; viz., Weshakin Or Nashaway, now Lancaster. and Quabaug, Brookfield. which are comi
and d. 16 Nov. 1714; Daniel, b. 5 Feb. 1715-16; Sarah, b. 7 Feb. 1717-18; Hannah, b. 25 Dec. 1719, m. James Lanman 25 July 1743; Thomas, b. 19 Jan. 1722-3. 7. John, s. of Samuel (4), was styled waterman, and sometimes cordwainer. He rem. to Hopkinton as early as 1725. By his wife Abigail, dau. of Joseph Winship, he had in Camb. Joseph, b. 15 July 1718; John, b. 10 July 1720; Sarah, b. 2 Jan. 1721-2; Samuel, bap. 10 Nov. 1723. 8. John, s. of John (5), was a carpenter. He m. Rebecca Winfore 1726; Susanna, b. about 1693, m. Thomas Carter of Woburn 1 Ap. 1713; Joanna, b. about 1695, d. unm. 17 Dec. 1716, a. 21 (Susanna and Joanna were bap. together 14 Feb. 1696-7); Abigail, bap. 16 Oct. 1698, m. John Manning, and was living in Hopkinton 1725; Joseph, b. 28 Feb. 1700-1701; Margery, b. 8 Aug. 1703. m. John Elder 26 Mar. 1729. Joseph the f. res. at Menot., was Selectman 1706 and 1725, and d. 18 Sept. 1725 his w. Sarah d. Sept. 1726, and Samuel Jennison of Wat. administered.
ving unmarried in 1732. 6. Isaac, s. of Samuel (3), m. Margaret, dau. of William Eager, 8 April 1708, and had Isaac, b. 13 Jan. 1708-9; Margaret, b. 25 Sept. 1710, m. Daniel Barrett 10 Nov. 1737; William, b. 24 Oct. 1712; Thomas, b. 16 Aug. 1714, and d. 16 Nov. 1714; Daniel, b. 5 Feb. 1715-16; Sarah, b. 7 Feb. 1717-18; Hannah, b. 25 Dec. 1719, m. James Lanman 25 July 1743; Thomas, b. 19 Jan. 1722-3. 7. John, s. of Samuel (4), was styled waterman, and sometimes cordwainer. He rem. to Hopkinton as early as 1725. By his wife Abigail, dau. of Joseph Winship, he had in Camb. Joseph, b. 15 July 1718; John, b. 10 July 1720; Sarah, b. 2 Jan. 1721-2; Samuel, bap. 10 Nov. 1723. 8. John, s. of John (5), was a carpenter. He m. Rebecca Winship 6 June 1728, and had Sarah, bap. 20 Ap. 1729; John, bap. 12 Dec. 1731; Esther, bap. 5 Jan. 1734-5. 9. Edward, s. of John (5), was a chair maker. By purchasing the rights of the other heirs, he became owner of the homestead on Dunster Street,
3 Aug. 1702. 5. Joseph, s. of Edward (1), m. Sarah Harrington, who d. 26 or 28 Nov. 1710, a. 39, and he m. a second Sarah; his chil. were Joanna, b. 14 Jan. 1689, d. young; Sarah, b. about 1691, m. Nathaniel Carter of Chs. 11 Dec. 1712, and d. before 1726; Susanna, b. about 1693, m. Thomas Carter of Woburn 1 Ap. 1713; Joanna, b. about 1695, d. unm. 17 Dec. 1716, a. 21 (Susanna and Joanna were bap. together 14 Feb. 1696-7); Abigail, bap. 16 Oct. 1698, m. John Manning, and was living in Hopkinton 1725; Joseph, b. 28 Feb. 1700-1701; Margery, b. 8 Aug. 1703. m. John Elder 26 Mar. 1729. Joseph the f. res. at Menot., was Selectman 1706 and 1725, and d. 18 Sept. 1725 his w. Sarah d. Sept. 1726, and Samuel Jennison of Wat. administered. 6. Edward, s. of Edward (3), by w. Sarah, had Edward, b. 26 Aug. 1707; Rebecca, b. 22 Aug. 1709, m. John Manning 6 June 1728, and John Wootton of Lex., a mariner, before 13 Dec. 1763; Sarah, b. 25 June 1712, m. Jonas Meriam of Lex., and was mother o
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