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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
thereafter as necessary......July 14, 1890 Message of President Harrison recommends legislation that will close the mails and express lines of the United States against lottery companies......July 29, 1890 Strike of 3,000 trainmen on the New York Central Railroad......Aug. 8, 1890 Wilson bill as amended, authorizing the States to prohibit sale of imported liquors in original packages, approved......Aug. 8, 1890 John Boyle O'Reilly, Irish patriot and poet, born 1844, dies at Hull, Mass.......Aug. 10, 1890 First annual convention of letter-carriers of the United States held at Boston, Mass.; 100 delegates......Aug. 13, 1890 Act establishing a national military park at the battle-field of Chickamauga......Aug. 19, 1890 Body of Capt. John Ericsson sent to Sweden on the United States steamer Baltimore......Aug. 23, 1890 Act for inspection by the Department of Agriculture of salted pork and bacon for export and of foods and drink and cattle imported, and empowerin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts (search)
r, born 1818, dies at Lynn......June 28, 1889 Maritime exhibition opens at Boston......Nov. 4, 1889 Great fire at Lynn; 296 buildings destroyed; 80 acres burned over; loss, $5,000,000......Nov. 26, 1889 Haverhill celebrates its 250th anniversary......July 2, 1890 Cyclone visits the suburbs of South Lawrence, the most severe ever recorded in the New England States; over $100,000 worth of property destroyed......July 26, 1890 John Boyle O'Reilly, Irish patriot, born 1844, dies at Hull......Aug. 10, 1890 First annual convention of the lettercarriers of the United States held at Boston; 100 delegates......Aug. 13, 1890 Accident on the Old Colony Railroad near Quincy; twenty killed, thirty-one injured......Aug. 19, 1890 Benjamin Penhallow Shillaber, the creator of Mrs. Partington, born 1814, dies at Chelsea......Nov. 25, 1890 Associate Justice Charles Devens, exAttorney-General of the United States, dies at Boston......Jan. 7, 1891 James Russell Lowell, born
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
expended by the town during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $591.18; in 1862, $8,403.63; in 1863, $7,851.91; in 1864, $8,813.74; in 1865, $4,900.00. Total amount, $30,560.46. Hull Incorporated May 29, 1644. Population in 1860, 285; in 1865, 260. Valuation in 1860, $179,078; in 1865, $150,864. The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were John Reed, Alexander Vining, Nehemiah Ripley, Jr.; in 1863, John Reed, Lewis P. Loring, D ($4,510.00). The amount paid for State aid by the town during the war, and repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $00; in 1862, $47.92; in 1863, $150.88; in 1864, $217.24; in 1865, $175.00. Total amount, $591.00. The ladies of Hull contributed in clothing, money and supplies for hospitals about two hundred dollars. Kingston Incorporated June 16, 1726. Population in 1860, 1,655; in 1865, 1,626. Valuation in 1860, $1,303,308; in 1865, $1,334,298. The selectmen in 18
ps the Edmund Gardner, who was in Ipswich, 1638. John Gibson. Remained here. Seth Grant. Removed to Hartford. Bartholomew Green. Remained here. Samuel Green. Remained here. Samuel Greenhill. Removed to Hartford. Nathaniel Hancock. Remained here. Edmund Hunt. Removed to Duxbury. Thomas Judd. Removed to Hartford. William Mann. Remained here. John Maynard. Removed to Hartford. Joseph Mygate. Removed to Hartford. Stephen Post. Removed to Hartford. John Prince. Removed to Hull. Thomas Scott. Removed to Hartford. Garrad Spencer. Removed to Lynn. Michael Spencer. Removed to Lynn. Timothy Stanley. Removed to Hartford. George Stocking. Removed to Hartford. Timothy Tomlins. Removed to Lynn. Humphrey Vincent. Removed to Ipswich. Samuel Wakeman. Removed to Hartford. Samuel Whitehead. Removed to Hartford. Simon Willard. Removed to Concord.
-9, d. in Auburn, 26 Feb. 1812; Sarah, b. 29 Nov. 1740, d. young; Henry, b. 17 Nov. 1742; Sarah, b. 1 July 1744; Lydia, b. 22 May 1746; Solomon, b. 13 Aug. 1748, d. at Edenton, N. C.; Mary, b. 12 Aug. 1751, m. Amos Binney of Hull, and was mother of the late Amos Binney, Navy Agent at Boston. Rev. Mr. Prentice was dismissed from his charge at Grafton 10 July 1747, on account of his favoring the preaching of Whitefield. He afterwards preached in Easton a few years, then in Bellingham, then in Hull from 1768 to 1772, and afterwards returned to Grafton, where he d. 22 May 1773, a. 68. [For most of the particulars in this paragraph, I am indebted to Binney's History of the Prentice Family.] 17. Samuel, s. of Solomon (9), m. Elizabeth Cook 23 Dec. 1736, and had Lydia, b. 11 Mar. 1737-8, m. Samuel Whitney of Wat. 15 Jan. 1765; Elizabeth, b. 2 Ap. 1741, d. here unm. 10 Aug. 1817. Samuel the f. res. in Wat. and d. between 30 Sept. and 6 Nov. 1749. His w. Elizabeth survived. 18. Eben
-9, d. in Auburn, 26 Feb. 1812; Sarah, b. 29 Nov. 1740, d. young; Henry, b. 17 Nov. 1742; Sarah, b. 1 July 1744; Lydia, b. 22 May 1746; Solomon, b. 13 Aug. 1748, d. at Edenton, N. C.; Mary, b. 12 Aug. 1751, m. Amos Binney of Hull, and was mother of the late Amos Binney, Navy Agent at Boston. Rev. Mr. Prentice was dismissed from his charge at Grafton 10 July 1747, on account of his favoring the preaching of Whitefield. He afterwards preached in Easton a few years, then in Bellingham, then in Hull from 1768 to 1772, and afterwards returned to Grafton, where he d. 22 May 1773, a. 68. [For most of the particulars in this paragraph, I am indebted to Binney's History of the Prentice Family.] 17. Samuel, s. of Solomon (9), m. Elizabeth Cook 23 Dec. 1736, and had Lydia, b. 11 Mar. 1737-8, m. Samuel Whitney of Wat. 15 Jan. 1765; Elizabeth, b. 2 Ap. 1741, d. here unm. 10 Aug. 1817. Samuel the f. res. in Wat. and d. between 30 Sept. and 6 Nov. 1749. His w. Elizabeth survived. 18. Eben
o and Army of Ohio, until Dec., 1863; headquarters, 9th Army Corps with Army of the Potomac until its muster out. Present at the battles of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania and Bethesda Church; engaged during the operations before Petersburg, Va.; in the campaign of eastern Tennessee; at the siege of Knoxville. Brevet Col. and Brig. General, U. S. Volunteers, Aug. 1, 1864. Brevet Maj. General, U. S. Volunteers, July 17, 1865. Mustered out, Aug. 10, 1865. Lovell, Charles Swain. Born at Hull, Mass., Feb. 13, 1811. Private (D), 2d U. S. Artillery, Dec. 30, 1830, to Jan. 5, 1832. Private (F), Q. M. Sergeant and Sergeant Major, Apr. 25, 1832, to Oct., 1837. Second Lieutenant, 6th U. S. Infantry, Oct. 13, 1837.First Lieutenant, July 7, 1838. Captain, June 18, 1846. Major, 10th U S. Infantry, May 14, 1861. Commanding battalion of 10th U. S. Infantry, Army of the Potomac, in the Peninsular campaign, Mar. to June, 1862. Commanding brigade and engaged at the battles of Malvern Hill, G
at anchor under any circumstances, while a British frigate of equal size lay insultingly off and on in the harbor. He went into the battle, doubtless, against his own judgment, and expressed a full sense of the difficulties of his position, in an interview with the late Rev. Dr. Lowell, the day before the action. His deportment was modest, but he said he should try to do his duty, notwithstanding the discouraging aspect of affairs on his ship. The action was visible from the old fort at Hull, where the telegraph stood several years since, and was witnessed by hundreds on Look-out Hill, Gloucester; also by an immense number of people in the lower harbor, in sailing boats and small craft, every available boat being pressed into use on the occasion; the roof of the old Exchange Coffee House (7 stories high) was filled with people, who with glasses watched the course of the Chesapeake down the harbor. During that afternoon and night the public excitement in Boston and the neighborin
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 26., My Revolutionary ancestors: major Job Cushing, Lieutenant Jerome Lincoln, Walter Foster Cushing (search)
ere part of the motley crowd of sixteen thousand patriots bent on pushing the British army of ten thousand drilled troops out of Boston. Job Cushing was an active captain throughout the war, in the state forces. In 1781 he was commissioned major and had command of the Second Suffolk regiment. One of his lieutenants was Jerome Lincoln, whose name appears on the muster roll of Captain Cushing's company for two months service. He was next with Colonel Gratan's regiment and was stationed at Hull. Again we hear of him in the Jersey campaign, camping that dreadful winter, and he was in the battle of Morristown. Needed clothing was sent him by his family. Neither young man married until after the war. Jerome Lincoln married Elizabeth Lincoln and there were fourteen children. Jerome applied for a pension at the age of seventy-nine. Major Job Cushing married Abigail Pierce of Scituate. There were four children, Job Cushing, Jr., being the eldest. This son, Job, married Elizabeth,