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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 45: the cruise of the Sumter and the havoc she committed. (search)
oon found himself in the hands of an enemy from whom there was no escape. The master of the vessel stated before the Admiralty Court sitting on board the Sumter that his ship belonged to the English house of Baring Brothers and was consigned to an agent in Boston; but, notwithstanding his expostulations, he was informed that his ship would be destroyed. The other vessel was approaching and Semmes had no time to parley. So the torch was applied to the beautiful bark Neapolitan, of Kingston, Massachusetts, and she with her valuable cargo was totally consumed. Commander Semmes' justification, to use his own expressions, was that Gallant naval officers wearing Mr. Welles' shoulder-straps, and commanding Mr. Welles' slips, were capturing little coasting schooners laden with fire-wood, plundering the houses and hen-roosts of noncombatants along the Southern coast, destroying salt-works and intercepting medicines going to Confederate hospitals. Is it strange that men who would tell such
nty-one years, Mr. Stetson baptized 210 persons; married 143 couples; admitted to the church 106 communicants; and officiated at 304 funerals. He was very soon invited to settle as the minister of the Unitarian Society in South Scituate, near Kingston, his native town in the Old Colony; and as he is there now laboring, with his warm heart and ready hand, the time to speak of his character has not yet come. May it be far distant! But, when society shall lose him, there will not be wanting pe the purpose of enlarging our meeting-house lot. The church and society have recently been so fortunate as to secure the pastoral services of Rev. Thomas E. Keely, the former successful pastor, for a number of years, of the Baptist church in Kingston, Mass. That his labors may be owned and blessed of the great Head of the church, and that the little one may continue, increase, and multiply, bringing glory to God and salvation to souls, is the prayer of the flock. Mystic church. This third
all! But soon the truth spread; and my friends in Hingham and Plymouth came up generously to the work. We felt that the two great ideas of the church and the schoolhouse, which our Pilgrim Fathers brought to this shore, were to be carried out, and ever trusted in God they would. But this narrative is growing too long. In a few words, then, let me add, that I found conventions to be the best missionaries of the truth; and I gathered them in Plymouth, Duxbury, New Bedford, Bridgewater, Kingston, Hanover, Hanson, &c. The Old Colony was ready to take the lead; and we began with petitions and memorials to the Legislature, all recommending the establishment of Normal Schools. How many hundred pages I wrote on this subject, during 1834-6, I dare not say. It was the subject of my thoughts and prayers. The wisdom of the Prussian scheme recommended itself to the reflecting; and, as I had studied it, I was invited to lecture in each of the New England States. I went to Portsmouth, Conco
nd fired the usual gun. She hauled up her courses, and backed her maintopsail at once, and in a moment more, we could see the brightest of stars and stripes fluttering in the breeze, and glittering, in very joyousness, as it were, in the rays of the morning's sun; for the captain of the prize had evidently treated himself to a new ensign. The cat ran close enough to parley with the mouse, before she put her paw upon it. The bark, for such the prize was, proved to be the Neapolitan, of Kingston, Mass., from Messina, in the island of Sicily, bound for Boston, with a cargo of fruit, dried and fresh, and fifty tons of sulphur. She had been freshly painted, with that old robber, the bald eagle, surrounded by stars, gilded on her stern; her decks looked white and sweet after the morning's ablution which she had just undergone; her sails were well hoisted, and her sheets well home; in short, she was a picture to look at, and the cat looked at her, as a cat only can look at a sleek mouse.
frame.Hot-well. Circulating-pump.Hydraulic governor. Cistern.Incrustation in boilers. Removing Clack-box. Cleading.Indicator. Clinker-bar.Induction-pipe. Clothing.Induction-valve. Cold-water pump.Injection-cock. Condenser.Injection-condenser. Condenser-gage.Injection-pipe. Condensing-engine.Injection-valve. Contra-vapeur.Injector. Counter.Inside cylinder. Cover.Instantaneous generator. Crank-axle.Intermediate shaft. Cross-head.Jacket. Cross-head block.Junk-ring. Cross-tail.Kingston's valve. Cut-off.Lag. Cut-off valve-gear.Lagging. Cylinder.Lap. Damper.Lead. Dash-pot.Lifter. Deading.Lifting-gear. Delivery-valve.Lifting rod. Detector. Low-water.Link motion. Diagonal framing and stays.Lock up safety-valve. Distribution.Locomotive valve-gear. Dome.Low-water alarm. Draining-engine.Low-water detector. Drip-pipe.Low-water indicator. Driver.Lubricator. Drop-flue.Main center. Dry-pipe.Main links. Dumb-plate.Man-hole. Eccentric.Manometer. Eduction-passage.Ma
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
$591.00. The ladies of Hull contributed in clothing, money and supplies for hospitals about two hundred dollars. Kingston Incorporated June 16, 1726. Population in 1860, 1,655; in 1865, 1,626. Valuation in 1860, $1,303,308; in 1865, $1,334 upon matters relating to the war was held on the 18th of May, at which it was voted to pay all persons, inhabitants of Kingston, who have enlisted or may enlist in the military service of the country six dollars a month while in said service. 18l 23d, The selectmen were directed to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer belonging to Kingston who had enlisted previous to that time and had received no bounty, and two thousand dollars to be raised by taxation werclerk was directed to transmit the vote of the town to the Legislature then in session. No action was taken upon it. Kingston furnished one hundred and eighty-nine men for the war, which was a surplus of nineteen over and above all demands. Six
Barrington 74 Greenfield 266 Greenwich 343 Groton 408 Groveland 194 H. Hadley 345 Halifax 546 Hamilton 196 Hancock 77 Hanover 550 Hanson 547 Hardwick 631 Harvard 633 Harwich 41 Hatfield 346 Hawley 268 Haverhill 198 Heath 269 Hingham 551 Hinsdale 79 Holden 635 Holland 303 Holliston 410 Holyoke 305 Hopkinton 412 Hubbardston 636 Hull 553 Huntington 348 I. Ipswich 202 K. Kingston 554 L. Lakeville 556 Lancaster 638 Lanesborough 80 Lawrence 202 Lee 81 Leicester 639 Leominster 642 Lenox 84 Leverett 271 Lexington 414 Leyden 272 Littleton 419 Lincoln 416 Longmeadow 307 Lowell 420 Ludlow 308 Lunenburg 644 Lynn 207 Lynnfield 212 M. Malden 425 Manchester 213 Mansfield 139 Marblehead 215 Marlborough 427 Marshfield 557 Marion 557 Mattapoisett 561 Medfield 504
estate should go to Sarah Glover and Elizabeth Culvery, sisters of the testator, residing in England. It is not unlikely that Mr. Read was himself an emigrant from England. 3. James, s. of James (2), m. Hannah, dau. of Rev. Joseph Stacey of Kingston (pub. 20 July 1744), and had Mary, bap. 13 Oct. 1745, d. 12 Aug. 1748; Sarah, bap. 1 Nov. 1747, m. Rev. William Fessenden 22 Jan. 1771, and d. before 1780; James. bap. 25 Feb. and d. 29 July 1750; James, bap. 28 July 1751; Joseph, bap. 14 Sept.nnah Hicks 2 June 1683, and had Hannah, b. 2 Sept. 1684. m. Stephen Hastings 28 Oct. 1708; Thomas, b. about 1686; Elizabeth, b. 19 Feb. 1687-8, d. unm. between 18 Dec. 1742 and 28 Ap. 1743; Joseph, b. about 1694, grad. H. C. 1719, ordained at Kingston 3 Nov. 1720, d. 25 April 1741, a. 47; Susanna, bap. 2 June 1700, d. 2 Jan. 1702-3. Thomas the f. was a blacksmith, and resided at the point made by the junction of Brighton and Brattle streets. His estate was divided 5 Nov. 1744. 2. Thomas,
opposite side of the street. He d. 6 May 1734, a. about 69. By his will, dated 30 Aug. 1728, he devised the use of his estate to his w. Mary, and constituted his s. James his sole heir; providing that if his son should (lie without issue, then the estate should go to Sarah Glover and Elizabeth Culvery, sisters of the testator, residing in England. It is not unlikely that Mr. Read was himself an emigrant from England. 3. James, s. of James (2), m. Hannah, dau. of Rev. Joseph Stacey of Kingston (pub. 20 July 1744), and had Mary, bap. 13 Oct. 1745, d. 12 Aug. 1748; Sarah, bap. 1 Nov. 1747, m. Rev. William Fessenden 22 Jan. 1771, and d. before 1780; James. bap. 25 Feb. and d. 29 July 1750; James, bap. 28 July 1751; Joseph, bap. 14 Sept. 1753; Joseph Stacey, bap. 10 Nov. 1754; Hannah, bap. 25 Sept. 1757. James the f. was a tanner, and resided through life on the homestead. He d. 31 July 1770, a. 48; his w. Hannah d. 22 Sept. 1788, a. 65. 4. James, s. of James (3), m. Elizabeth
d. before 26 Ap. 1708, leaving a dau. Sarah, who was provided for in her grandfather's will. 5. Daniel, s. of John (1), by w. Deliverance, had Deliverance, b. 13 Dec. 1715; Daniel, b. 26 July 1718; John, b. 3 Mar. 1720-21. Stacy, Thomas, m. Hannah Hicks 2 June 1683, and had Hannah, b. 2 Sept. 1684. m. Stephen Hastings 28 Oct. 1708; Thomas, b. about 1686; Elizabeth, b. 19 Feb. 1687-8, d. unm. between 18 Dec. 1742 and 28 Ap. 1743; Joseph, b. about 1694, grad. H. C. 1719, ordained at Kingston 3 Nov. 1720, d. 25 April 1741, a. 47; Susanna, bap. 2 June 1700, d. 2 Jan. 1702-3. Thomas the f. was a blacksmith, and resided at the point made by the junction of Brighton and Brattle streets. His estate was divided 5 Nov. 1744. 2. Thomas, s. of Thomas (1), by w.——, had Susanna, m. Cutting Bean 27 Dec. 1744; Thomas, b. about 1723, was a ship-joiner in Boston 5 Nov. 1744, when he sold to Joseph Bean the homestead which had that day been assigned to him from the estate of his grandfathe
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