hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 128 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 21 3 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905 9 1 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 6 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 5 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.). You can also browse the collection for Marlboro, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Marlboro, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Advertisement (search)
of the hostile army; and Lloyd soon came to fortify me in this conviction. I found again, afterwards, the same cause in the first successes of Napoleon in Italy, which gave me the idea that by applying, through strategy, to the whole chess-table of a war (à tout l‘échiquier d'une guerre), this same principle which Frederick had applied to battles, we should have the key to all the science of war. I could not doubt this truth in reading again, subsequently, the campaigns of Turenne, of Marlborough, of Eugene of Savoy, and in comparing them with those of Frederick, which Tempelhoff had just published with details so full of interest, although somewhat heavy and by far too much repeated. I comprehended then that Marshal de Saxe had been quite right in saying that in 1750 there were no principles laid down upon the art of war, but that many of his readers had also very badly interpreted his preface in concluding therefrom that he had thought that those principles did not exist. Co
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
n interior direction in all the cases where I have recommended them as being the most favorable; or else I should assign to it in every other hypothesis, a direction upon the extremity of the front of operations of the enemy, according to the maxims above explained; leaving to my adversaries the pleasure of manoeuvering according to the opposite systems. Until this experiment can have place they will permit me to remain firm in my belief, justified by the campaigns of Eugene of Savoy, of Marlborough, of Frederick the Great, and Napoleon. Since I have undertaken to defend principles which seem incontestable, I will seize this occasion to reply to objections, still less founded, which distinguished, but often passionate and unjust writers, have raised against the above mentioned article. The first are from the Bavarian Colonel Xilander, who, in his course of strategy, has often misconceived the principles which have served me as a basis. This writer, otherwise full of erudition,
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), chapter 7 (search)
he batteries. When we have arrived under the fire of musketry, then shelters are not to be calculated upon; if we be in condition to assail, we must do so; shelters are suitable only, in this case, for skirmishers and for defensive troops. It is sufficiently important, generally, to defend villages which are upon the front, or to seek to carry them if we be the assailant; but it is equally necessary not to attach an undue importance thereto, forgetting the famous battle of Hochstaedt: Marlborough and Eugene seeing the bulk of the French infantry buried in the villages, forced the centre and took twenty-four battalions, sacrificed to guard those posts. For the same reason it is useful to occupy clumps of trees or copses, which may give a support to that one of the two parties which is the master of them. They shelter the troops, conceal their movements, protect those of the cavalry, and hinder that of the enemy from acting in their proximity. The skeptic Clausewitz was not a