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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 9 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 8 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 4 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The English Voyages, Navigations, and Discoveries (intended for the finding of a North-west passage) to the North parts of America, to Meta incognita, and the backeside of Gronland , as farre as 72 degrees and 12 minuts: performed first by Sebastian Cabota, and since by Sir Martin Frobisher, and M. John Davis, with the Patents, Discourses, and Advertisements thereto belonging. (search)
eutenant generall Fenton . 4 In the Anne Francis Best. 5 In the Hopewell Carew. 6 In the Beare Filpot. 7 In the Thomas of Ipswich Tanfield 8 In the Emmanuel of Exceter Courtney. 9 In the Francis of Foy Moyles. 10 In the Moone Upcot. 11 In the Emmanuel of Bridgewater Newton . 12 In the Salomon of Weymouth Randal. 13 In the Barke Dennis Kendal . 14 In the Gabriel Harvey . 15 In the Michael Kinnersley. The sayd fifteene saile of ships arrived and met together at Harwich , the seven and twentieth day of May Anno 1578, where the Generall and the other Captaines made view, and mustred their companies. And every several Captaine received from the
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true discourse of the three Voyages of discoverie, for the finding of a passage to Cathaya, by the Northwest, under the conduct of Martin Frobisher Generall: Before which, as a necessary Preface is prefixed a twofolde discourse, conteining certaine reasons to prove all partes of the World habitable. Penned by Master George Best, a Gentleman employed in the same voyages. (search)
eutenant generall Fenton . 4 In the Anne Francis Best. 5 In the Hopewell Carew. 6 In the Beare Filpot. 7 In the Thomas of Ipswich Tanfield 8 In the Emmanuel of Exceter Courtney. 9 In the Francis of Foy Moyles. 10 In the Moone Upcot. 11 In the Emmanuel of Bridgewater Newton . 12 In the Salomon of Weymouth Randal. 13 In the Barke Dennis Kendal . 14 In the Gabriel Harvey . 15 In the Michael Kinnersley. The sayd fifteene saile of ships arrived and met together at Harwich , the seven and twentieth day of May Anno 1578, where the Generall and the other Captaines made view, and mustred their companies. And every several Captaine received from the
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The third voyage of Captaine Frobisher, pretended for the discoverie of Cataia, by Meta Incognita, Anno Do. 1578. (search)
eutenant generall Fenton . 4 In the Anne Francis Best. 5 In the Hopewell Carew. 6 In the Beare Filpot. 7 In the Thomas of Ipswich Tanfield 8 In the Emmanuel of Exceter Courtney. 9 In the Francis of Foy Moyles. 10 In the Moone Upcot. 11 In the Emmanuel of Bridgewater Newton . 12 In the Salomon of Weymouth Randal. 13 In the Barke Dennis Kendal . 14 In the Gabriel Harvey . 15 In the Michael Kinnersley. The sayd fifteene saile of ships arrived and met together at Harwich , the seven and twentieth day of May Anno 1578, where the Generall and the other Captaines made view, and mustred their companies. And every several Captaine received from the
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The names of the ships with their severall Captaines. (search)
eutenant generall Fenton . 4 In the Anne Francis Best. 5 In the Hopewell Carew. 6 In the Beare Filpot. 7 In the Thomas of Ipswich Tanfield 8 In the Emmanuel of Exceter Courtney. 9 In the Francis of Foy Moyles. 10 In the Moone Upcot. 11 In the Emmanuel of Bridgewater Newton . 12 In the Salomon of Weymouth Randal. 13 In the Barke Dennis Kendal . 14 In the Gabriel Harvey . 15 In the Michael Kinnersley. The sayd fifteene saile of ships arrived and met together at Harwich , the seven and twentieth day of May Anno 1578, where the Generall and the other Captaines made view, and mustred their companies. And every several Captaine received from the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
p. m. we only marched about eight miles, arriving at that time two and a half miles from Adairsville, with Newton's division moving on the direct road. At about the same time the head of General Wood's column arrived three-fourths of a mile from Newton, on our right, on the railroad. Here and at this time the enemy stubbornly resisted our advance, having now opposed to us infantry, cavalry, and artillery. 4.20, General Wood reported that citizens from Adairsville had just informed him that thk in his front, which could not be done before dark. At same time General Stanley was ordered up to cover Newton's left flank, as the enemy was moving around it. During all of this time we had heavy skirmishing, and the enemy firing artillery on Newton. 5.30, Stanley got into position, two brigades on the left of Newton, extending into the woods and holding a small hill therein, and the other brigade massed in the rear of Newton's left. 6 p. m., assault was ordered to be made by General Newto
urred among the enemy, and troops followed and drove them till dark, capturing three guns, three caissons, muskets, equipments, etc., innumerable, and bivouacked on the field. Gen. Williams, First brigade, Col. Donnelly, of the Twenty-eighth New York, commanding, reenforced Gen. Shields's forces. Gen. Banks, who was on the way to Washington when the battle occurred, returned and assumed command. In the mean time, Gen. Shields's division, commanded by Col. Kimball, pursued the enemy beyond Newton, shelling them the whole distance. Jackson's men were perfectly demoralized and could not be rallied. They threw overboard the dead and wounded to lighten the wagons. They confessed a loss of eight hundred and sixty-nine killed, wounded and missing. The National forces lost one hundred and fifteen killed and four hundred and fifty wounded.--(Doc. 103.) This morning the schooner Cora, prize to the United States gunboat Pinola, Lieut. Crosby commanding, arrived at Key West, Fla. The Co
ssed off in the most admirable manner, and without a single casualty. . . . The land forces were not so fortunate--one man being killed and two wounded, also one missing; but, in consideration of the fact that Longstreet's corps was at or near Newton, ten miles from Aylett's, and Pickett's division at the White House, twelve miles from where we landed, I think they were as fortunate as could be expected. . . . J. H. Gillis, Lieut. Com. and Sen. Officer, off Yorktown. To A. R. Admiral Lee. , proved an immense nuisance. They followed the column, and we had to find transportation for them, to the exclusion of horses and cattle, that are really needed for the service. General Picket's rebel division of eight thou. sand men was at Newton, ten miles from A<*>lette. He had also a strong outpost within three miles of that place; but the panic was so great in the country through which we passed that there was no serious attack on our forces. It was not credited that two hundred men
llinois cavalry, under Major Starr, to proceed eastward, and destroy such bridges, etc., as he might find over Chunkey River. Having damaged as much as possible the railroad and telegraph, and destroyed all government property in the vicinity of Newton, I moved about four miles south of the road and fed men and horses. The forced marches which I was compelled to make in order to reach this point successfully necessarily very much fatigued and exhausted my command, and rest and food were absoluand rejoin us. Upon approaching the place, he found it had been reenforced, and the bridge over the Oka Noxubee River destroyed, so that the railroad and telegraph could not be reached. He came back to our trail, crossed the Southern Railroad at Newton, took a south-east course to Enterprise, where, although his force numbered only thirty-five men, he entered with a flag of truce, and demanded the surrender of the place. The commanding officer at that point asked an hour to consider the matter
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Sedgwick at Fredericksburg and Salem Heights. (search)
til we reached Salem Church, an unpretentious red-brick structure situated on a ridge covered with dense woods and undergrowth. To-day it bears many scars of the contest waged around it. At this point the enemy were in position with four fresh brigades withdrawn from Hooker's front, and prepared to contest any farther advance. Lee had met with such complete success in his attack upon Hooker that he felt he could well spare these troops and not suffer. Brooks on the left of the road and Newton on the right quickly formed their commands and made several gallant assaults. The fight was very severe in the thick woods, and for a time was waged with varying success. The crest of the woods and a little school-house near the church were gained, and once it was thought they could be held, but the enemy, in superior numbers, pressed on, and the ground and the church were left in their possession. The contest did not last long, but nearly 1500 were killed and wounded. Bartlett's brigade
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
ent. This was approved. On the 17th, however, he reported that the Federal army had resumed its offensive operations. He also reported that General Grant was occupying New Carthage, and that there were nine Federal gun-boats between Vicksburg and Port Hudson. Colonel B. H. Grierson [Federal] set out from La Grange on the 17th of April on his noted raid through Mississippi, terminating at Baton Rouge, May 2d. The mischief reported was the burning of some bridges, engines, and cars near Newton, the destruction of ammunition and cars at Hazelhurst, and the burning of the railroad depot and cars at Brookhaven. Several brigades of infantry were detached to protect such property; but fruitlessly, of course. Admiral Porter's squadron, and three transports towing barges, passed Vicksburg on the night of April 16th, and ran down to Hard Times, where the army was; and six more transports and barges followed on the night of the 22d. On the two occasions, one transport was sunk, anothe
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