hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 3 3 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 2 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 1 1 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 1 1 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 19, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 20 results in 15 document sections:

1 2
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 2: Strategy.—General divisions of the Art.—Rules for planning a Campaign.—Analysis of the military operations of Napoleon (search)
ntirely abandon the line, and save as many as possible of the troops for some new plan of operations. (Maxim 20.) If, however, the undisciplined army be sustained by fortifications, it can take up the accidental line of operations in the same manner, and with the same probability of success, as is done by a regular force. We have examples of accidental lines in the operations of the king of Prussia, after the battle of Hohenkirchen, and of Washington, in New-Jersey, after the action of Princeton. This is one of the finest in military history. Napoleon had projected a change in his line of operations, in case he lost the battle of Austerlitz; but victory rendered its execution unnecessary. Again in 1814 he had planned an entire change of operations; but the want of co-operation of the forces under Mortier and Marmont forced him to abandon a plan which, if properly executed, had probably defeated the allies. Jomini pronounced it one of the most brilliant of his military career.
John A. Gilchrist, jaw, Lunenburg; Charles H. Stratton, leg shattered, Winchendon; Geo. W. Rice, leg, Fitchburgh. Co. G, Christian Class, leg, Clinton; Christopher Lenhandt, hand, do.; Baptist Reno, breast, Douglas; Ferdinand Swan, hand, Clinton; Geo. Vetter, arm and breast, do.; Daniel Williams, left arm shot away, Milford. Co. H, Second Lieut. N. H. Foster, left elbow, N. Brookfield; Corporal Randall Mann, supposed mortally, Leicester; George E. Kent, do.; H. H. Ware; W. H. Endith, Princeton. Co. I, John S. Brown, head, Orange; W. L. Wheeler, do., Royalton; S. F. Jillson, thigh; A. N. Cobleigh, leg. Co. K, Samuel Thurston, leg, Worcester; Edwin F. Pratt, leg, Holden; Frank S. Sibley, leg, Auburn. Missing. Co. A, George F. Robinson, Worcester. Co. B, D. H. Eames, Hopkinton. Co. C, Corporal Samuel Healy, Boston; W. C. Hemmenway, West--Boyleston; W. C. Hardy, Worcester; Horace Merriam, Warren; Lewis Wright, do. Co. E, Jas. Gordon, Worcester; Frank Smith, do.;
s emigrant ancestor had twenty-four children, of whom Andrew m. Phebe Eliot, grand-daughter of the Rev. Andrew Peters, of Middleton; and had eleven children, nine of whom are now living. Of these,--   Jonathan Perkins m., in 1823,----, fourth daughter of Nathan Wait, Esq., by whom he had six children, four of whom are now alive.   Perry, Sanford B., b. Sept. 20, 1819, in Leicester, was son of William Perry, who was born there, Apr. 12, 1797. William was the son of Abijah Perry, b. in Princeton, Aug. 3, 1764,--son of Aaron Perry, b. in Mendon, Apr. 17, 1733. The father of Aaron was John P., who is supposed to be a descendant of Edmund Perry, who settled in N. E. about 1650. Sanford B. Perry m. Sarah Jane Barr, b. of James Barr, in New Ipswich, July 11, 1827. Her father was b. May 23, 1790; and his father, James, b. in Kilbarchan, co. of Renfrew, Dec. 12, 1752, emigrated to the United States, June 22, 1774.  1POLLY, Samuel, and Elizabeth, had--  1-2Samuel, b. Nov. 3, 1714. <
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Inman, George 1755-1789 (search)
Inman, George 1755-1789 Military officer; born in Boston, Mass., Dec. 3, 1755; graduated at Harvard College in 1772. During the Revolutionary War he was a royalist, entering the army as a private, but soon receiving a commission; took part in the battles of Princeton, Brandywine, Germantown, and Monmouth, in the first of which he was wounded. He was the author of Narrative of the Revolutionary War, 1776–;1779. He died in the West Indies in 178
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts (search)
ar London, England, June 3, 1780. He was descended through a line of reputable men from Anne Hutchinson.] Affray in Richardson's house in Boston; the boy Snider is mortally wounded by a shot from the house—the first victim......Feb. 22, 1770 Affray at Gray's rope-walk in Boston between citizens and the British soldiers......March 2, 1770 Boston massacre......March 5, 1770 Graduates of Harvard College take degrees in homespun ......1770 David Everett, journalist, born at Princeton, Mass.......March 29, 1770 [Author of: You'd scarce expect one of my age To speak in public on the stage, etc. Written while teaching a grammar school at Ipswich.] Castle William, in Boston Harbor, delivered into the hands of the King's troops by Governor Hutchinson......Sept. 10, 1770 Population of the State, 262,680......1770 Governor Hutchinson's salary, £ 2,000, paid by the English government. He thus becomes independent of the province......1772 Ministry of England an
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 2: Hereditary traits. (search)
of which is still in the possession of some of his descendants. He built a house there, but afterwards removed to Woburn, where he died. His son Jacob and his grandson Jacob succeeded him at Middleton, and a great-grandson, Timothy, was also born there in 1739, of whom more must be said. Timothy Fuller graduated at Harvard College in 1760, and his name, with that date, might long be seen upon the corner-stone of the building called Stoughton. He became a clergyman, was settled in Princeton, Mass., and differed from most of his parishioners in regarding the impending American Revolution as premature. He therefore preached a sermon to the minute-men, choosing for his text the passage, Let not him that girdeth on the harness boast himself as he that putteth it off. But the minute-men found it more satisfactory to gird on the harness and put off the minister; so the Rev. Timothy Fuller was dismissed from his parish by an ecclesiastical council in 1776. He preached elsewhere; sue
the following table:— Years as Mayor.Born.Died.Native of. Occupation. James D. Green.1846-47, 1853, 1860-61.1798.1882.Maiden, Mass. Clergyman. Sidney Willard.1848-49-50.1780.1856.Beverly, Mass. Professor. George Stevens.1851-52.1803.1894.Norway, Maine. Manufacturer. Abraham Edwards.1854.1797.1870.Boston, Mass. Lawyer. Zebina L. Raymond.1855-1864.1804.1872.Shutesbury, Mass. Merchant. John Sargent.1856-57-58-59.1799.1880. Hillsboroa, N. H. Chas. Theo. Russell.1861-621815.1896. Princeton, Mass. Lawyer. Geo. C. Richardson.1863.1808.1886.Royalston, Mass. Merchant. J. Warren Merrill.1865-661.1819.1889.South Hampton, N. H. Merchant. Ezra Parmenter.1867.1823.1883.Boston, Mass. Physician. Chas. H. Saunders.1868-69.1821.Cambridge, Mass. Merchant. Hamlin R. Harding.1870-71.1825.1889.Lunenburg, Mass. Agent. Henry O. Houghton.1872.1823.1895.Sutton, Vermont. Publisher. Isaac Bradford.1873-74-75-76.1834.Boston, Mass. Mathematician. Frank A. Allen.1877.1835.Sanford, Maine. Mercha
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter 3: Journeys (search)
urning to their homes; they are of the race of poor white folks, commonly. My copy of Dred occasions some remarks. I trust your father will feel a becoming reverence when I say that I am a General in the Kansas Army, having been immediately presented with a commission to that effect by the redoubtable Jim Lane himself, the Marion of the age. I keep it as a valuable autograph, or to be used on my next visit to Kansas. The Worcester summers were varied by occasional sojourns at Princeton, Massachusetts, and at Pigeon Cove, near Gloucester. Princeton, June, 1853 Dearest Mother: We do not see Wachusett — we are halfway up the ascent — but we look east and west over great valleys which need only more water to be radiantly beautiful. . . The little hamlet sleeps in profound repose — a two-horse wagon, or even a pedlar with a pack, are events for a day. We look between the two little white churches up a lane which leads to Wachusett; last night we followed this up to its firs<
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Index. (search)
05; and Emerson, 105, 106; at Atlantic dinners, 106-11; and Atlantic Monthly, 111, 112; his essay on Snow, 114; travels, 117-53; goes to Mt. Katahdin, 117-20; excursion to Adirondacks, 120-24; journey to Fayal, 124-37; and Kansas, 137-44; at Princeton, Mass., 144-46; at Pigeon Cove, Mass., 146-51; description of Aunt Hannah, 151-53; and military preparations at Worcester, 154, 155, 162-64, 169-81; on emancipation, 164; in barracks, 170-81; takes command 1st S. C. Vols. 181, 182; with the regimen, 272. Phillips, Wendell, 82, 93; and Whittier, 9, 11; fire at home of, 269, 270. Phillips, Mrs., Wendell, 268, 269. Pierrepont, Edward, 291, 292. Pigeon Cove, Mass., described, 146-51. Pollock, Sir Frederick and Lady, 282, 283. Princeton, Mass., summer at, 144-46. Pumpellys, the, 328. Q Quakers, meetings of, 73-77, 235-37. Quincy, President, of Harvard, on Disunion, 88, 89. R Rachel, Mlle., actress, 50, 51. Rarey, John S., and his horses, 50. Rawnsley, Canon
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Margaret Fuller Ossoli. (search)
no recollection, save that he was mentioned with a sort of respect, as being a lawyer and having been a congressman. But his daughter has described him, in her fragment of autobiography, with her accustomed frankness and precision:-- My father was a lawyer and a politician. He was a man largely endowed with that sagacious energy which the state of New England society for the last half century has been so well fitted to develop. His father was a clergyman, settled as pastor in Princeton, Massachusetts, within the bounds of whose parish farm was Wachusett. His means were small, and the great object of his ambition was to send his sons to college. As a boy, my father was taught to think only of preparing himself for Harvard University, and, when there, of preparing himself for the profession of law. As a lawyer, again, the ends constantly presented were to work for distinction in the community, and for the means of supporting a family. To be an honored citizen and to have a hom
1 2