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d, or a church gathered upon the granted premises. In this manner, forty-four towns were constituted and established within the Plymouth and Massachusetts Colonies before the year 1655, without any more formal act of incorporation. Among the oldest are the following: Plymouth, 1620; Salem, 1629 ; Charlestown, 1629; Boston, 1630; Medford or Mystic, 1630; Watertown, 1630; Roxbury, 1630; Dorchester, 1630 ; Cambridge or Newton, 1633; Ipswich, 1634; Concord, 1635; Hingham, 1635; Newbury, 1635; Scituate, 1636; Springfield, 1636; Duxbury, 1637; Lynn, 1637; Barnstable, 1639; Taunton, 1639; Woburn, 1642; Malden, 1649. London, May 22, 1629: On this day the orders for establishing a government and officers in Massachusetts Bay passed, and said orders were sent to New England(. Although, in the first settlement of New England, different sections of country were owned and controlled by Companies in England, yet the people here claimed and exercised a corporate power in the elections of thei
h, b. Apr. 17, 1702; m. Rev. Shearjashub Brown, of Scituate, Feb. 12, 1736. 11-13CALEB Brooks, m., 2d, Ruth Ahis three brothers, Richard, John, and William, to Scituate, before 1648. (Vide Deane's History of Scituate. Scituate. ) He had a son, Samuel, b. 1659, who had a son, Benjamin (2), b. 1699, who m. Rebecca House, 1723, and had sevAbigail Sole, 1756, and lived on Curtis's Hill, in Scituate. By his second wife, Zeporah Randall, he had two dren, one of whom was--  4-5James O., b. 1804, at Scituate. He moved to Medford in 1820, where he served an Kenrick, Edward, was a descendant of George K., of Scituate, freeman, 1635. He had two sons by his first wifelizabeth, d. Feb. 3, 1718.  1Oldham, Thomas, of Scituate, 1650, and in 1635 aged ten perhaps; m. Mary, dau. of Rev. William Witherell, of Scituate, 1656, by whom he had Mary, Thomas, Sarah, Hannah, Grace, Isaac (2), Rr, N. H. 3-8Jonathan Oldham m. Patience Clapp, of Scituate, and had--  8-15Joseph Oldham, who m. Grace Tilde
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Angell, James Burrill, 1829- (search)
Angell, James Burrill, 1829- Educator and diplomatist; born in Scituate, R. I., Jan. 7, 1829; was graduated at Brown University; in 1849; Professor of Modern Languages and Literature at Brown University in 1853-60; president of the University of Vermont in 1866-71; and since 1871 president of the University of Michigan. In 1880-81 he was United States minister to China; in 1887 a member of the Anglo-American Commission on Canadian Fisheries: in 1896 chairman of the Canadian-American Commission on Deep Waterways from the Great Lakes to the Sea: and in 1897-98 United States minister to Turkey. He is author of numerous addresses, and magazine articles.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cornell, Ezekiel 1780- (search)
Cornell, Ezekiel 1780- Military officer; born in Scituate, R. I.; was self-educated. When the Revolutionary War began he entered the army as lieutenant-colonel of Hitchcock's regiment, and was present at the siege of Boston; later was promoted brigadier-general; and commanded a brigade of State troops which were of much service during the occupation of Massachusetts by the British. In 1780-83 he was a member of the Continental Congress and chairman of the military committee.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cushing, William 1732-1810 (search)
Cushing, William 1732-1810 Jurist; born in Scituate, Mass., March 1, 1732; graduated at Harvard University in 1751; studied law; became eminent in his profession; was attorney-general of Massachusetts; a judge of probate in 1768; judge of the Superior Court in 1772; and in 1777 succeeded his father as chief-justice of that court. Under the Massachusetts constitution of 1788 he was made chief-justice of the State; and in 1789 President Washington appointed him a justice of the Supreme Cour68; judge of the Superior Court in 1772; and in 1777 succeeded his father as chief-justice of that court. Under the Massachusetts constitution of 1788 he was made chief-justice of the State; and in 1789 President Washington appointed him a justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. He offered him the chief-justiceship in 1796, as the successor of Jay, but he declined it. He administered the oath of office to Washington in his second inauguration. He died in Scituate, Sept. 13, 1810.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hopkins, Esek 1718-1802 (search)
Hopkins, Esek 1718-1802 Naval officer; born in Scituate, R. I., in 1718. Governor Cooke commissioned him a brigadier-general at the breaking out of the Revolution. In December, 1775, Congress commissioned him commander-in-chief of the inchoate navy, and he put to sea in the first squadron in February, 1776, consisting of four ships and three sloops, sailing for the Bahama Islands. There he captured a large quantity of ordnance stores and ammunition, and 100 cannon. He captured two British vessels on his return. Complaint was made that he had not annoyed the British ships on the southern coast, and he was arraigned before the naval Esek Hopkins. committee of Congress on the charge. He was acquitted, but unavoidable delays in getting vessels to sea afterwards caused other charges to be made, and he was dismissed the service, Jan. 2, 1777. During his long life he exerted great political influence in Rhode Island. He died in North Providence, R. I., Feb. 26, 1802.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hopkins, Stephen 1707-1785 (search)
Hopkins, Stephen 1707-1785 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Scituate, R. I., March 7, 1707; was engaged in early life in mercantile business and land surveying; became an active member of the Rhode Island legislature, and was speaker of the Assembly from 1732 till 1741. In 1739 he was chief-justice of the Court of Common Pleas, and of the Supreme Court from 1751 to 1754. Mr. Hopkins was a delegate in the colonial convention at Albany in 1754, and one of the committee who drew up a plan of union. From 1754 to 1768 he was governor of Rhode Island, excepting four years. He was a member of the first Continental Congress, and remained in that body from 1776 to 1778. He had been from the beginning a stanch opposer of the oppressive measures of Parliament. He was one of the committee that drafted the Articles of Confederation (see Confederation, articles of); was a superior mathematician; and was for many years chancellor of Brown University. Notwithstanding his d
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts (search)
uel Stone......1633 Small-pox destroys many of the Indians of Massachusetts......1633 Ipswich settled......1633 Scituate settled......1633 Roger Williams returns to Salem from Plymouth colony......1633 Thomas Dudley chosen governor ande aged Roger Williams accepts a commission as captain for the defence of the town he had founded.] Captain Pierce, of Scituate, with about fifty men and twenty Indians, routed near Seekonk; his entire party cut off......March 26. 1676 MarlborTurner, who is afterwards killed and his command partially defeated by the arrival of other Indians......May 18, 1676 Scituate threatened and partially destroyed......May 20, 1676 Edward Randolph arrives at Boston as a special messenger from thlitic and unjust......July 15, 1813 British land at Wareham and burn several vessels and a factory; they also land at Scituate, a few miles from Boston, and throw the whole coast into fresh alarm. A million dollars is appropriated by the legislat
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Woodworth, Samuel 1785-1842 (search)
Woodworth, Samuel 1785-1842 Author; born in Scituate, Mass., Jan. 13, 1785; learned the printer's trade; printed a weekly paper in New Haven, Conn., in 1807; removed to New York in 1809; and conducted The War, a weekly journal, and The Halcyon luminary, a monthly magazine, during the War of 1812. He wrote The champions of freedom, a romantic history of the war, and several dramatic pieces; edited the Parthenon; published many poems; and was one of the founders of the New York Mirror. He died in New York, Dec. 9, 1842.
er married Miss Relief, daughter of David He was the son of David and Hannah (Richmond) Jacobs of Hanover. He served as one of the committee of safety during the Revolution; and died in 1808, aged 79 years. He was the son of Joshua Jacobs of Scituate, who married Mary James in 1726. His father was David Jacobs, who settled in Scituate as early as 1688, and was a schoolmaster, and a deacon in the church. and Hannah (Hersey) Jacobs of Hanover, April 25, 1810,--a lady of strong mind, of an amiScituate as early as 1688, and was a schoolmaster, and a deacon in the church. and Hannah (Hersey) Jacobs of Hanover, April 25, 1810,--a lady of strong mind, of an amiable disposition, and of graceful bearing. They resided in Hancock Street, and were attendants of King's Chapel, of which Mr. Sumner was for some time the clerk, and of which the Rev. James Freeman, D. D., the Rev. F. W. P. Greenwood, D. D., and afterwards the Rev. Ephraim Peabody, D. D., were the eloquent pastors. Charles Sumner, whose name is intimately associated with the stirring political events as well as with the literature of the country for the last thirty years, and whose life and
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