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the twenty-ninth of March, by Major-Gen. McClellan, then General-in-Chief. On the thirtieth of April, the Secretary of War sent the following order to Col. Miles, at Harper's Ferry: You will please make daily reports of the state of your command to this Department. I have not now time to notice further the censure of the Commission; when I am at leisure, it will receive the attention which it merits. John E. Wool, Major-General United States Army. Captain Binney's letter. Somerville, mass., September 27, 1862. To the Editor of the Boston Journal: I have noticed with much pain and sorrow the many reflections and insinuations adverse to the character of Col. Dixon S. Miles, going the rounds in the papers, as well as the many ridiculous statements in regard to the surrender of Harper's Ferry, and cannot but feel it my duty to deny the charges of disloyalty, and give the public a correct statement in regard to the above-mentioned lamented affair. Our first rumors of th
the twenty-ninth of March, by Major-Gen. McClellan, then General-in-Chief. On the thirtieth of April, the Secretary of War sent the following order to Col. Miles, at Harper's Ferry: You will please make daily reports of the state of your command to this Department. I have not now time to notice further the censure of the Commission; when I am at leisure, it will receive the attention which it merits. John E. Wool, Major-General United States Army. Captain Binney's letter. Somerville, mass., September 27, 1862. To the Editor of the Boston Journal: I have noticed with much pain and sorrow the many reflections and insinuations adverse to the character of Col. Dixon S. Miles, going the rounds in the papers, as well as the many ridiculous statements in regard to the surrender of Harper's Ferry, and cannot but feel it my duty to deny the charges of disloyalty, and give the public a correct statement in regard to the above-mentioned lamented affair. Our first rumors of th
ty of the Sons of New England of Philadelphia, Dec. 221846 Derby Academy Lecture,--Doing before Believing1847 An Address delivered before the Art Union of Philadelphia1848 Mirror of Nature, translated from the German of G. H. Schubert1849 Gems of German Verse; containing the Song of the Bell, and other Translations by various hands1851 A History of Jesus, 2d edition, with Introduction and Notes1853 Domestic Worship.  Discourses1855 The Kingdom of Heaven, an Ordination Sermon at Somerville, Mass.  Faith in Christ, Ordination of Mr. Hodges at Barre, Mass.  Rev. Edward B. Hall. A Sketch of the Life and Character of the Hon. Samuel Howe, from the Christian Examiner 1828 A Sermon on Fear as a Religious Principle1832 A Sermon on Old Age1835 Two Discourses, comprising a History of the First Congregational Church in Providence, after the Close of a Century from the Formation of the Church, with an Appendix1836 The Temperance Reform, from the Christian Examiner, March1840 Disco
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Babbitt, Isaac, 1799-1862 (search)
Babbitt, Isaac, 1799-1862 Inventor; born in Taunton, Mass., July 26, 1799. About 1831 he made, in Taunton, the first Britannia-ware manufactured in the United States, and in 1839 he invented the anti-friction metal which bears his name. Congress gave him $20,000 for his invention; and he took out patents in England (1844) and Russia (1847). He died in Somerville, Mass., May 26, 1862.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Census, United States (search)
62 Nashville, Tenn.80,86576,1684,697 Seattle, Wash.80,67142,83737,834 Hartford, Conn.79,85053,23026,620 Reading, Pa.78,96158,66120,300 Wilmington, Del.76,50861,43115,077 Camden, N. J.75,93558,31317,622 Trenton, N. J.73,30757,45815,849 Bridgeport, Conn.70,99648,86622,130 Lynn, Mass.68,51355,72712,786 Oakland, Cal.66,96048,68218,278 Lawrence, Mass.62,55944,65417,905 New Bedford. Mass.62,44240,73321,709 Des Moines, Ia.62,13950,09312,046 Springfield, Mass.62,05944,17917,880 Somerville, Mass.61,64340,15221,491 Troy, N. Y.60,65160,956*305 Hoboken, N. J.59,36443,64815,716 Evansville, Ind.59,00750,7568,251 Manchester. N. H.56,98744,12612,861 Utica, N. Y.56,38344,00712,376 Peoria. Ill.56,10041,02415,076 Charleston, S. C.55,80754,955852 Savannah, Ga.54,.24443,18911,055 Salt Lake City, Utah.53,53144,8438,688 San Antonio, Tex.53,32137,67315,648 Duluth, Minn.52,96933,11519,854 Erie, Pa.52,733 40,63412,099 Elizabeth, N. J.52,13037,76414,366 Wilkesbarre, Pa.51.72137,7
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fulton, Justin Dewey 1828- (search)
Fulton, Justin Dewey 1828- Clergyman; born in Earlville, N. Y., March 1, 1828; graduated at the University of Rochester in 1851, and then studied at the theological seminary there. In 1863-73 he was pastor of Tremont Temple, Boston; in 1873-75 of the Hanson Place Baptist Church, in Brooklyn; later he founded the Centennial Baptist Church in Brooklyn, and was its pastor for several years. He then gave up church work and devoted himself to writing and speaking against the Roman Catholic Church. His publications include The Roman Catholic element in American history; Woman as God made her; Show your colors; Rome in America; Charles H. Spurgeon our ally, etc. He died in Somerville, Mass., April 16, 1901.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hale, Salma 1787-1866 (search)
Hale, Salma 1787-1866 Historian; born in Alstead, N. H., March 7, 1787; was elected to Congress in 1816; appointed clerk of the Supreme Court in 1817; and admitted to the bar in 1834. He is the author of a History of the United States; The administration of John Quincy Adams; Annals of the town of Keene, etc. He died in Somerville, Mass., Nov. 19, 1866.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jackson, Charles Thomas 1805-1880 (search)
Jackson, Charles Thomas 1805-1880 Geologist; born in Plymouth, Mass., June 21, 1805; graduated at Harvard in 1829, and afterwards studied in Paris. He was appointed State geologist of Maine and surveyor of public lands in 1836, and of Rhode Island in 1839; and subsequently was engaged on the geological survey of New Hampshire; explored the southern shore of Lake Superior in 1844; and was appointed to survey the mineral lands of Michigan in 1847. He is author of a large number of reports on the geology of Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, etc. He claimed to be the discoverer of etherization, and received the Montyon prize from the French Academy of Sciences. He died in Somerville, Mass., Aug. 28, 1880.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sawyer, Thomas Jefferson 1804-1899 (search)
Sawyer, Thomas Jefferson 1804-1899 Clergyman; born in Reading, Vt., Jan. 9, 1804; graduated at Middlebury College in 1829; was ordained in the Universalist Church in 1830; pastor of a church in New York City in 1830-45 and again in 1852-61; principal and Professor of Theology in the Liberal Institute, Clinton, N. Y., in 1845-52; one of the founders of Tufts College in 1847; Professor of Theology there in 1869-92, when he was made professor emeritus. He was author of Endless punishment in the very words of its advocates; regular contributor for forty years to the Universalist quarterly; and editor of The Christian messenger and the Christian ambassador. He died in Somerville, Mass., July 23, 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Societies, religious and benevolent (search)
ew York Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb—was chartered. The first public asylum for the blind was the Perkins Institute and Massachusetts Asylum, founded in 1829. It was opened in 1832, under the superintendence of Dr. Samuel G. Howe (q. v.), who treated the complicated infirmities of Laura Bridgman successfully. The first asylum for the insane in this country was founded at Williamsburg, Va., in 1773, and was the only one in the United States until 1818, when another was established at Somerville, Mass. That was followed by the Bloomingdale Asylum, New York, in 1821, and the asylum at Hartford in 1824. The Moravians in Georgia established the first orphan asylum in the American colonies about 1738, and Rev. George Whitefield laid the foundation-stone of one 10 miles from Savannah in 1740. Preventive and reformatory institutions are among our most important public charities. The first of the kind in the United States was the New York House of Refuge for Juvenile Delinquents, found
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