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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Appomattox campaign. (search)
fective strength of the Union army at the beginning of the campaign approximated 120,000. The losses were as follows: command. Killed. Wounded. Captured or Missing. Total. Second Army Corps 203 1191 630 2,024 Fifth Army Corps 263 1656 546 2,465 Sixth Army Corps 203 1324 15 1,542 Ninth Army Corps 253 1305 161 1,719 Twenty-fourth Army Corps 119 807 20 946 Twenty-fifth Army Corps 10 40 40 90 Sheridan's Cavalry 190 961 339 1,490 Mackenzie's Cavalry 9 38 24 71 Provost Guard 2 1   3 Collis's Independent Brigade 13 71   84 Abbot's Siege Batteries 6 8 53 67 Unattached Artillery 3 11   14 Aggregate 1274 7413 1828 10,515 The Confederate Army. General Robert E. Lee. Provost Guard: 1st Va. Batt'n, and B, 44th Va. Batt'n, Maj. D. B. Bridgford. Escort: 39th Va. Batt'n, Capt. Samuel B. Brown. Engineer Troops, Col. T. M. R. Talcott; 1st Reg't,----; 2d Reg't,----. first Army Corps, Lieut.-Gen. James Longstreet. Pickett's division, Maj.-Gen. George E. Pickett. Steu
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
and that he (Sickles), with his corps, did all the fighting at Gettysburg. So, I presume, before long it will be clearly proved that my presence on the field was rather an injury than otherwise. The President has written me that he desires to see me upon the subject of executing deserters; so, as soon as I can get time, I shall have to go up to Washington. To John Sergeant Meade: Son of General Meade. Headquarters army of the Potomac, January 6, 1864. We have now at headquarters Collis's Zu-Zu Regiment, commanded by one of the Bowens, Collis being in command of a brigade in the Third Corps. They have a fine band, one of the best in the army. A good many of the old volunteers have re-enlisted—more than I expected—and if Congress allows the bounty hitherto paid, many more will re-enlist. To Mrs. George G. Meade: Willard's hotel, Sunday, February 14, 1864—7 P. M. I felt very badly at leaving you, but I tried to reconcile myself to what was inevitable and could not<
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
omac, to March, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to April, 1864. Provost Guard, Army of the Potomac, to April, 1865. Collis' Independent Brigade, 9th Army Corps, April, 1865. Hart's Island, N. Y., Harbor, Dept. of the East, to June, 1865. Service. March up the Potomac to Leesb Mustered out September 4, 1863. Guthrie's Independent Company Militia Infantry. Organized at Pittsburg October 16, 1862. Mustered out July 23, 1863. Collis' Independent Company Zouaves de Afrique. Organized at Philadelphia and mustered in August 17, 1861. Moved to Fort Delaware August 17, thence to Frederick, Mndent Company Infantry. Organized at Pittsburg August 30, 1864. Mustered out December 10, 1864. Zouaves de Afrique, Independent Company Infantry. (See Collis' Independent Company Infantry.) Helmbold's Independent Company Militia Infantry. Organized at Harrisburg July 18, 1863. Mustered out September 7, 1863.