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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 6 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Benton (Mississippi, United States) or search for Benton (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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es at Mechanicsburg on the sixth, the marine cavalry boats were found at Satartia. The former is a small town situated about four miles directly back from the latter. The command moved on, and next day encountered the enemy strongly posted near Benton. The troops were speedily brought up and placed in position, and a brief skirmish put the rebels to flight, but the nature of the country is such, that a retreating force by the use of artillery can annoy or delay their pursuers very easily, and found to be Colonel Mayberry's brigade of mounted infantry, with four pieces of artillery. The fight here was principally with artillery, and the loss was slight. Pursuit was continued six miles, when the men were recalled, and encamped near Benton. Meanwhile, from despatches captured, General McArthur learned that General Wirt Adams was on his way from Canton to cross the Big Black and join May-berry with three thousand more men that night. Confident of his ability to contend with the en
rmy corps           5 3           Seventeenth Army corps         1 1 1           Cavalry Division         1 1 13   10         1       7 27 19   35 3     Expenditure of Ammunition. command. no. Of rounds. Fourteenth Army corps 1,007 Twentieth Army corps 832 Army of Tennessee 1,665 Total 3,504 Guns Captured and Lost. place. captured from enemy. lost by us.   No. of Guns. No. of Guns. Columbia 43   Cheraw 25   Fayetteville 26   Averysboro 3   Benton's   2 Total 97 2 Of these all were serviceable, and about four-fifths were field guns of recent and approved pattern. If to the operations of your armies, the legitimate fruits of which they really are, be credited the guns captured at Charleston and Wilmington, (excluding from the number of the latter those captured at Fort Fisher and the other forts at the mouth of Cape Fear river), the total artillery captured during the past ten months by troo
int, which employed five hundred hands for the manufacture of those articles of prime necessity to the army. From Winona Colonel Noble, with detachment of three hundred men of Colonel Winslow's brigade, was sent north to destroy the railroad and all government property between that point and Grenada. Colonel Osband's brigade was sent south on the line of the railroad to destroy it as far as practicable. With the main column I moved south-west, via Lexington and Benton, to Vicksburg. At Benton Colonels Osband and Noble rejoined us, having been highly successful; Colonel Osband met and engaged a detachment of Wirt Adams' command, about five hundred strong, under Colonel Woods, in which the enemy were defeated, with a reported loss of fifty killed and wounded. I reached Vicksburg with my entire command in good condition, with about six hundred prisoners, eight hundred head of captured stock, and one thousand negroes, who joined the column during the march. For particulars I refer y