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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 33 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 19 1 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 14 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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raid, viewing with much satisfaction, as we took the road toward Blackland, the still smoldering embers of the burned trains. On the 4th of June I was ordered to proceed with my regiment along the Blackland road to determine the strength of the enemy in that direction, as it wonverging near Booneville. The head of the enemy's column on the Blackland and Booneville road came in contact with my pickets three miles at of the enemy's advancing forces, to a point where it joined the Blackland road, about three miles from Booneville, and directed him, upon reaching the Blackland road, to turn up it immediately, and charge the rear of the enemy's line. Under no circumstances was he to deploy the leaving Booneville. After Alger had reached and turned up the Blackland road, the first thing he came across was the Confederate headquarhe enemy, stampeded by the charges in front and rear, fled toward Blackland, with little or no attempt to capture Alger's command, which migh
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
through Corinth, Danville, and Rienzi toward Blackland, halting 4 miles from the latter place June we arrived at the lines of General Pope, at Blackland, where we bivouacked until the evening of Jund found the enemy had all passed on down to Blackland, except a few sick and prisoners, whom we caavalry — the First Ohio--in the direction of Blackland. W. S. Rosecraks, Brigadier-General, U.routes and country lying between Booneville, Blackland, and Twenty Mile Creek, particularly as the es, made a reconnaissance toward Ripley. At Blackland he encountered the enemy, 100 strong, whom h guns of Powell's battery, was sent down the Blackland road. Arriving at Osborn's Creek, he encoun with four pieces of artillery moved towards Blackland; the country, as usual, broken and swampy. e of the Tuscumbia; thence by the Rienzi and Blackland road to Carrollsville and Baldwin. 3d. erve) via the turnpike to Kossuth; thence to Blackland, Carrollsville, and Baldwin. 4th. Polk'[7 more...]
rom your present position you must do so via Blackland, not by Booneville, which would expose you tmile from that place, which will take you to Blackland. Van Dorn is within 2 miles of me with his ng him to move, when he retires to-night, on Blackland instead of Booneville; the route by Boonevilill march by the road between Booneville and Blackland, passing by Dick Smith's house and Mr. Andereadquarters Army of the Mississippi, Near Blackland, Miss., May 31, 1862. General G. T. Beauregard, citizens and scouts, and about 1 mile beyond Blackland a body of 2,000 of the enemy's cavalry were t and a considerable force 4 or 5 miles from Blackland. It is 30 miles or more to Smith's BridgeSmith's House, at intersection of Rienzi and Blackland, and turn off to Booneville, eight miles froille, the other via this place by the way of Blackland. Our wagons are probably now at Blackland. Blackland. I go there immediately. The hour being so late, I will not be able to return to Rienzi; therefore
nition wagons and caissons; their men throwing away their camp and garrison equipage in the flight. The weather was cool; the roads were dry, and likely to be so for a month to come. Corn was ripe, and, as yet, untouched. We had 3,000,000 of rations in Corinth, and ammunition for six months. There was but one bridge injured on the Mobile and Ohio road; and it could be put in running order by a regiment in half a day. The enemy were so alarmed that, when Hamilton sent a reconnoissance to Blackland, they vacated Tupelo, burning even the bacon which they could not take away on the first train. I had eighty wagon-loads of assorted rations which had reached me that night at Ripley, and had ordered the 30,000 from Chewalla to Hurlbut. believing the Rebel army utterly demoralized and incapable of resistance; but he was directed to desist and return to Corinth. Nine days after his return, he was relieved from his command at Corinth, and ordered to report at Cincinnati; where he found a
every woods for the enemy for miles around. On the fourth of June, the brigade, supported by Powell's battery, made a forced reconnoissance, and encountered a strong body of rebel cavalry, infantry, and artillery, a short distance this side of Blackland, with whom they had a successful skirmish, the Second Iowa losing three killed and nine wounded, and the Second Michigan two killed and seven wounded. Again, on the sixth, it made another reconnoissance in the direction of Baldwin, skirmishing driving the enemy that distance to Twenty-Mile Creek, in the bottom of which lay a large body of rebel infantry. On the ninth the brigade, temporarily in command of Colonel Sheridan, was directed to proceed the shortest possible road from near Blackland to Baldwin. It did so, and arrived at the latter point on the following morning at four o'clock, finding the enemy gone. Lieut.-Col. Hatch was then ordered with a battalion each of the Second Michigan and Second Iowa, to proceed toward Guntow
nce in the burning cars, fired by Colonel Elliott at Booneville, that he pronounced it to be at Corinth, and that he violently swore at a report that reached him, that the explosions were at Booneville. That he sent all over town to ascertain the author of the rumor, and while engaged in this search a messenger arrived direct from Booneville confirming the report that the Yankees were there. Whereat, Beauregard altered his route and galloped away immediately, taking the roundabout way of Blackland to Baldwin. This statement was made in the presence of several officers, and was entirely voluntary and unasked for. Colonel Elliott arrived at Booneville on the thirtieth of May, at two o'clock A. M. He remained secreted in the woods east of the railroad until daylight, when he moved down upon the town, and was met by a body of about two hundred rebel cavalry, who incontinently fled at a volley from Captain Campbell's Second Michigan revolving rifles. This was the only resistance Col
they had been left a sacrifice for the safety of their comrades. It is surprising that General Force, whose fairness of appreciation we have noticed on several previous occasions, should apparently have founded his version of these events upon the incorrect despatches forwarded by Generals Halleck and Pope. Had he sifted the matter with greater care, he would undoubtedly have avoided all mention of the imaginary pursuit by General Pope's army, first to Rienzi, then to Baldwin, then to Blackland, where, he says, an order to attack had already been issued, when General Buell arrived at the front and suspended it. From Fort Henry to Corinth, by General Force, p. 190. But General Force himself must have been aware of the weakness of his authority, for after endorsing, to some extent, the report about the ten thousand prisoners and fifteen thousand stand of arms captured by General Pope's forty thousand men, he makes the following remarks: The prisoners taken were few, and Pope was
's corps via the Tennessee pike to Kossuth, until it reaches the south side of the Tuscumbia; thence by the Rienzi and Blackland Road to Carrollsville and Baldwin. 3d. Breckinridge's corps (or reserve) via the turnpike to Kossuth; thence to Blackland, Carrollsville, and Baldwin. 4th. Polk's corps via the turnpike to Kossuth; thence, by the Western road, to Blackland, Carrollsville, and Baldwin. 5th. The baggage trains of these corps must leave their position at 12 M. precisely on thBlackland, Carrollsville, and Baldwin. 5th. The baggage trains of these corps must leave their position at 12 M. precisely on the 28th instant, and stop for the night on the south side of the Tuscumbia, on the best available ground. The provision trains will follow the baggage trains. 6th. The ammunition and ambulance trains must be parked at the most convenient point to their brigades, and moved in rear of the provision trains to the south side of the Tuscumbia, where they will await further orders. All of these trains are to be accompanied by one pioneer and two infantry companies, properly distributed per briga
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Mississippi, 1862 (search)
64th Infantry. IOWA--2d Cavalry. INDIANA--2d Cavalry. MICHIGAN--10th Infantry. June 2: Affair near RienziILLINOIS--42d Infantry (Detachment). June 3: Skirmish, BlacklandOHIO--1st Cavalry. June 3: Reconn. toward Carrollsville and BaldwynILLINOIS--7th Cavalry; Battery "C," 1st Light Arty.; 10th, 16th, 22d, 27th, 42d, 51st and 64th--1st Cavalry. June 3-4: Skirmishes, BoonevilleILLINOIS--Battery "I," 1st Light Arty. MICHIGAN--3d Cavalry. June 4: Skirmishes, Osborn's and Wolf's Creeks near BlacklandINDIANA--2d Cavalry. IOWA--2d Cavalry. MICHIGAN--2d Cavalry. OHIO--1st Cavalry (Cos. "E," "I" and "M"). June 6: Reconn. from Booneville toward BaldwynIOWA--2d CaRMONT--7th Infantry. Batteries "D," "H," "I," "K" and "M", 1st Light Arty.; June 26-29: Engagement, VicksburgU. S. Navy, Farragut's Fleet. June 28: Skirmishes, BlacklandILLINOIS--7th Cavalry (Co. "K"). MICHIGAN--3d Cavalry (Detachment). Union loss, 1 wounded, 1 missing. Total, 2. June 29: Skirmish, RipleyMICHIGAN--3d Cavalry. J
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
arch 23. Capture of New Madrid March 14 and of Island No.10 April 8. Expedition to Fort Pillow, Tenn., April 13-17. Moved to Hamburg Landing, Tenn., April 18-22. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Reconnoissance toward Corinth May 8. Reconnoissance on Alabama Road to Sharp's Mills May 10. Reconnoissances to Burnsville and Iuka May 22-23. Tuscumbia Creek May 30. Pursuit to Booneville May 30-June 12. Reconnoissance toward Baldwyn June 3. Blackland June 28 (Co. K ). Guard Duty on Memphis and Charleston R. R. from Tuscumbia to Decatur, Ala., till December 1. Hatchie River July 5. Trinity, Ala., August 22 (Detachment). Reconnoissance toward Iuka September 16. Burnsville September 17. Battle of Corinth, Miss., October 3-4. Pursuit to Ripley October 5-12. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign November, 1862, to January, 1863. Reconnoissance toward Colliersville November 5, 1862. Reconnoissance toward Lamar,
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