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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Vicksburg during the siege. (search)
d been received from General Pemberton, bearing date the 12th, and beginning: The enemy is apparently moving in heavy force toward Edwards' Depot, on Southern Railroad. The movable army of Pemberton, consisting of the divisions of Bowen and Loring, which had come up from Grand Gulf, and Stevenson, who was detached from the garrison of Vicksburg, leaving the two divisions of Forney and M. L. Smith in loco, was now at Edwards' Depot, eighteen miles east of Vicksburg; and headquarters were at Bovina, a station some four miles west. On the 13th, General Johnston sent a dispatch to the War Department in these words: I arrived this evening, finding the enemy in force between this place and General Pemberton. I am too late. These were ominous words. Through Captain Yerger he dispatched that order to General Pemberton which has been the bone of contention in all the subsequent discussions on the responsibility of failure. It directed the latter to come up, if practicable, on the rear
ch was received on the 14th: I have lately arrived, and learn that Major-General Sherman is between us with four divisions at Clinton. It is important to reestablish communications, that you may be reinforced, if practicable. I come up on his rear at once. To beat such a detachment would be of immense value. The troops here could co-operate; all the strength you can quickly assemble should be brought. Time is all-important. On the same day, the 14th, General Pemberton, then at Bovina, replied: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your communication. I moved at once with whole available force, about sixteen thousand, leaving Vaughn's brigade, about fifteen hundred, at Big Black Bridge; Tilghman's brigade, fifteen hundred, now at Baldwin's Ferry, I have ordered to bring up the rear of my column; he will be, however, fifteen or twenty miles behind it. Baldwin's Ferry will be left, necessarily, unprotected. To hold Vicksburg are Smith's and Forney's divis
ay; that General Pemberton's forces, except the garrison of Port Hudson (five thousand) and of Vicksburgh, were at Edwards's Depot — the General's headquarters at Bovina; that four divisions of the enemy, under Sherman, occupied Clinton, ten miles west of Jackson, between Edwards's Depot and ourselves. I was aware that reenforcew going on in my front. On the afternoon of the same day I received General Pemberton's first reply to the order sent him from Jackson to attack Sherman, dated Bovina, May fourteenth, nine o'clock and ten minutes A. M., as follows: I move at once with my whole available force from Edwards' Depot. In directing this move I domarched fifteen miles in the direction indicated in General Pemberton's note, received the previous evening. In the afternoon a letter was brought from him dated Bovina, May seventeenth, a copy of which has been forwarded to the War Department. In this, referring to my despatch of May thirteenth from Jackson, General Pemberton w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
lorida]. There were about six thousand men in the two brigades. He said further that Colonel Wirt Adams, of the cavalry, had informed him that General Pemberton's forces were at Edwards's depot, 20 miles from Vicksburg, and his headquarters at Bovina, 8 miles from that place; that the Seventeenth Corps (McPherson's) had moved that day from Raymond to Clinton, 9 or 10 miles from Jackson, on the road to Vicksburg. He added that General Maxey's brigade from Port Hudson was expected in Jackson n Captain Yerger, who volunteered to bear it, to move to Clinton at once and attack a Federal. corps there, the troops in Jackson to cooperate; to beat that detachment and establish communication, that he might be reinforced. It was delivered at Bovina early next morning, and General Pemberton replied promptly that he moved at once with his whole available force ; but in the ride of ten or twelve miles to his camp at Edwards's depot he determined to disobey my order, and on his arrival assemble
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Vicksburg. (search)
immediate danger of pursuit prevented. After the stampede at the bridge orders were issued for the army to fall back to Vicksburg, Major-General Stevenson being placed in command of the retreating forces. General Pemberton rode on himself to Bovina, a small railroad station about two and a half miles from the river. I was the only staff-officer with him. He was very much depressed by the events of the last two days, and for some time after mounting his horse rode in silence. He finally sa adding that if besieged he would be relieved. To all of which General Pemberton replied that my youth and hopes were the parents of my judgment; he himself did not believe our troops would stand the first shock of an attack. We finally reached Bovina, where the general halted, and at my earnest instance wrote an order directing me to return to Vicksburg in all possible haste, to put the place in a good state of defense. This order directed all officers, of whatsoever rank, to obey all requis
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
at Lieutenant-General Pemberton's active forces were at Edwards's Depot, and his headquarters at Bovina; that McPherson's corps had marched from Raymond to Clinton; and was thus interposed between thehe afternoon of that day, a reply to my first dispatch to General Pemberton was received, dated Bovina, 9.10 o'clock A. M., of the 14th. It was to inform me that he would move at once, in obedience d, on the 15th, to march to Bolton's Depot, eight miles from Edwards's. After receiving, at Bovina, early in the morning of the 14th, my order of the night before, directing him to march upon Cliieutenant-General Pemberton directed the retreat of Stevenson's division across the Big Black to Bovina, near which it bivouacked about one o'clock; but he halted Bowen's troops at a line of rifle-pits the commander of General Pemberton's scouts, brought me a letter from that officer, written at Bovina in the morning, in which he said: I notified you, on the morning of the 14th, of the receipt of
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
Baldwin's Ferry road, and from thence between Bovina and Edwards's Depot, each division being in goevening of the 12th I moved my headquarters to Bovina, to be nearer the scene of active operations. 14th, while on my way to Edwards's Depot from Bovina, I received the following dispatch, dated May portant. I immediately replied as follows: Bovina, May 14, 1863. I have the honor to acknowleut one o'clock that night, and bivouacked near Bovina. The entire train of the army, under the jung very late in the night, did not move beyond Bovina, and I awaited in vain intelligence of the appy report. Instructions had been given from Bovina that all cattle, sheep, and hogs, belonging tokson, the 13th of May, was received by me near Bovina, on the morning of the 14th, I think, between d ten o'clock on the morning of the 14th, near Bovina, on the west of the Big Black River. I at fir so informed General Johnston. Before leaving Bovina, I gave some necessary instructions to meet th
Florida1811 Georgia8923 Kentucky96119 Louisiana9046 Maryland279115 Mississippi4168 Missouri6099 North Carolina6461 South Carolina1623 Tennessee7029 Texas2916 Virginia83117   Total1,011803 Whole number in twenty years1,814 A little girl, recognizing the uniform of a Massachusetts soldier, at Baltimore, on Sunday, ran up to him, slipped a rose into his hand, and was out of sight before he had a chance to thank her.--N. Y. Sun, June 7. in Vicksburg, Mississippi, the ladies are opposed to the Home guard business, and can't see any bravery in the young men who prefer home duty to service in the field. The following is a copy of one of their bulletins: to arms! To arms!--There will be a meeting of the young ladies of Warren county, to be held at Bovina on Thursday, 18th inst., for the purpose of forming themselves into a Home Guard, for the protection of those young men who will not volunteer for the country's cause. A lady. --N. Y. Sunday Mercury, June 18.
Baldwin's Ferry road, and from thence between Bovina and Edwards Depot — each division being in gooing of the twelfth, I moved my headquarters to Bovina to be nearer the scene of active operations. orning of the fourteenth, while on my way from Bovina to Edwards' Depot, I received the following di important. I immediately replied as follows: Bovina, May 14, ‘63--I have the honor to acknowledge ut one o'clock that night, and bivouacked near Bovina. The entire train of the army, under the jung very late in the night, did not move beyond Bovina, and I awaited in vain intelligence of the apply report. Instructions had been given from Bovina that all cattle, sheep, and hogs belonging to t Edwards' Depot — the general headquarters at Bovina; that four divisions of the enemy, under Shermsent him from Jackson to attack Sherman, dated Bovina, May fourteenth, 9.10 A. M., as follows: I movafternoon a letter was brought from him, dated Bovina, May seventeenth, a copy of which has been for<
p in his rear at once—to beat such a detachment would be of immense value. Troops here could cooperate. All the troops you can quickly assemble should be brought. Time is all-important. On the same day, the 14th, General Pemberton, then at Bovina, replied: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your communication. I moved at once with whole available force, about sixteen thousand, leaving Vaughan's brigade, about fifteen hundred, at Big Black Bridge; Tilghman's brigade, fifteen h the defenses. On the entire line one hundred two pieces of artillery of different caliber, principally field guns, were placed in position at such points as were deemed most suitable to the character of the gun. Instructions had been given from Bovina that all the cattle, sheep, and hogs, belonging to private parties and likely to fall into the hands of the enemy, should be driven within our lines. Grant's army appeared on the 18th. The development of the entrenched line from our extreme r
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