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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 40 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 25 3 Browse Search
John James Geer, Beyond the lines: A Yankee prisoner loose in Dixie 19 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 12 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Columbus (Mississippi, United States) or search for Columbus (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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thin reach, by refusing to fight losing battles for Bowling Green and Nashville, and had thus brought off his army intact and undemoralized; retreating across the Tennessee and into a region at once undevastated and unappalled by war, full of resources, wherein devotion to the Union had been utterly suppressed, if not eradicated, and whence, by a net-work of railroads and telegraphs, he communicated easily with Richmond, and with every portion of the Cotton States. The recent evacuation of Columbus by Polk was probably ordered by him, in obedience to his policy of concentrating around Corinth the greatest possible force, with intent to rush upon and overwhelm the Union army, so carelessly encamped just before him on the hither bank of the Tennessee. Having a spy in nearly every dwelling in southern Tennessee, he was doubtless aware that the command of that army had just been turned over by Gen. C. F. Smith, an experienced and capable soldier, to Gen. Grant, so recently from civil lif
peal to me on the expediency of exercising a constitutional power which I think exists. In response to such appeal, I have to say, it gave me pain when I learned that Mr. Vallandigham had been arrested — that is, I was pained that there should have seemed to be a necessity for arresting him — and that it will afford me great pleasure to discharge him so soon as I can, by any means, believe the public safety will not suffer by it. The Ohio Democratic Convention, which met June 11. at Columbus, and by acclamation nominated Mr. Vallandigham as their candidate for Governor, passed resolves strongly condemning his banishment as a palpable violation of four specified provisions of the Federal Constitution, and appointed their President and Vice-Presidents (nearly all Members or ex-Members of Congress) a Committee to address the President in favor of a revocation of the order of banishment. In obeying this direction, that Committee, claiming to utter the sentiments of a majority of t
every direction ; while Brig.-Gen. A. L. Smith--directed against him from Columbus, Ky., by Hurlbut, with 6,000 men, of whom 2,000 were mounted — was brought to a full stop by the execrable badness of the roads, and finally retraced his steps to Columbus. lumbus. Hence, a cooperating force dispatched from Corinth on the south, consisting of Gen. Mower's brigade of infantry and Col. Mizener's cavalry, found nothing to cooperate with ; while the 7th Illinois cavalry, Col. Prince, which had moved wounded. but names Col. A. P. Thompson and Lt.-Col. Lanhum, killed, and Col. Crosslin and Lt.-Col. Morton, slightly wounded. His loss was doubtless far heavier than he admitted. Buford, with a part of Pillow's men, next summoned April 13. Columbus, held by Col. Lawrence, 34th New Jersey; who refused to surrender. and could not be taken. Moving thence to Paducah, Buford summoned that post; but, a surrender being declined, he retired without assaulting. Forrest, with the larger portion
urriedly over war-wasted north Alabama, and then spreading out so as to sweep over a broad stretch of the plenteous region watered by the tributaries of the Black Warrior and other main affluents of the Tombigbee river: thus menacing at once Columbus, Miss., Tuskaloosa, and Selma, Alabama. Forrest, commanding the chief Rebel force left in this quarter, was at West Point, near Columbus, Miss.; so that Wilson, moving rapidly on several roads, passed his right and reached Elyton March 30. wiColumbus, Miss.; so that Wilson, moving rapidly on several roads, passed his right and reached Elyton March 30. without a collision; destroying by the way many extensive iron-works, collieries, &c., and pushing the few Rebel cavalry found at Elyton rapidly across the Cahawba at Montevallo; where the enemy was first encountered March 31. in force: Roddy's and Crossland's commands coming up the Selma road, but being routed and driven southward by a charge of Upton's division. The Rebels attempted to make a stand at a creek, after being driven 4 or 5 miles; but they were too weak, and were again routed by
579; battle and map of, 580; grand assault on, 581; officers killed at, 582. Collins, Capt., of the Wachusett, captures the Florida in a Brazilian harbor, 645; court-martialed, 646. colonization, President Lincoln's scheme, 257. colored Orphan Asylum, fired by rioters, 505. Colquitt, Brig.-Gen., at Antietam, 206. Columbia, Tenn., sacked by Morgan, 404. Columbia, Ark., Marmaduke defeated at, 551. Columbia, S. C., Sherman captures-pillage and burning of, 700; 702. Columbus, Miss., Gen. Buford summons, 620. Columbus, Ky., evacuated by Rebels, 54. Confederate naval officers — corsairs, 641. Confederates' opinion of Black Union soldiers, 523; impressment of slaves for military service by, 522; resolutions of in relation to Abolition prisoners, 523-4. Congaree river, passage of, by Sherman, 699. Congress, appropriation in aid of the colonization of slaves, 257; meeting of the XXXV<*>th, 257; officers prohibited from returning fugitive slaves, 257; an