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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 389 39 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 122 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 92 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 76 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 26 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 24 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 18 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 18 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 12, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Farmington (Mississippi, United States) or search for Farmington (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

rt the evacuation of Mulberry Island and Jamestown early yesterday morning. From General Halleck's command. Pittsburg Landing May 31, 9 P.M. Hon E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. General Pam's Division made a reconnaissance to Farmington to-day, and found about 4,500 of the enemy, and drove them in hand some style, killing 30 and wounding many also capturing some prisoners and their tents camp equipage, etc. At dark our cavalry was in pursuit of their artillery and a bag gage train beyond Farmington, in the direction of Corinth. witnessed the fight. Our men behaved splendidly. An artillery reconnaissance went to Glendale this morning and destroyed two trestle bridges and some of the tracks of the Memphis and Charleston railroad. It has been a splendid day's work for the left wing. The weather is clear and the roads are becoming good. Thos. A Scott, Assistant Secretary of War. The latest — important Ts to Transpire Ortly Washington, May 4
ulsed.[special Dispatch to the Richmond Dispatch] Corinth, May 9, via Mobile, May 10. --Generals Bragg and Van-Dorn advanced on the enemy this morning at 11 o'clock, and after a sharp skirmish of three hours, drove them two miles beyond Farmington and the bridges. Five thousand troops were engaged on each side. The Federal cavalry charged Robinson's battery, but were repulsed end retreated in confusion. Riderless horses were seen running to our line. Our casualties are feur line. Our casualties are few in number. Major and Capt. Leftwich, of Van Dorn's staff, are dangerously wounded. We captured a large amount of clothing and knapsacks, and took possession of the Federal army telegraph to Farmington. The less of the enemy is heavy. The Confederates offered battle. D. [office.] Corinth, May 9th, 1862. Via Mobile, May 10th To Gen. S. Cooper We attacked the enemy to-day and drove him from his position several miles. G. T. Bulurigard.
Mobile, May 10 --The Advertiser's Corinth correspondent says he has just returned from the front. The enemy were driven across Seven-Mile Creek, running like sheep. It appears that Gen. Pupe's division of the Federal army a one occupied Farmington. Gen. Halleck, with the main body, is still on the river. The Confederate loss was slight. The Federal retreat was so rapid that we were unable to capture many prisoners. Gens. Price and Van Dorn led the a tack. We captured the telegraph o Federal army a one occupied Farmington. Gen. Halleck, with the main body, is still on the river. The Confederate loss was slight. The Federal retreat was so rapid that we were unable to capture many prisoners. Gens. Price and Van Dorn led the a tack. We captured the telegraph office at Farmington. The Confederates are returning to Corinth. It is reported that the Confederate forces operating down the Tennessee have captured large numbers of prisoners and a large amount of property.