hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 49 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 32 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 31 7 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 26 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 24 24 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 21 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 17 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 17 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 15 3 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Grenada (Mississippi, United States) or search for Grenada (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 3 document sections:

e-pits, Unknown to Sherman, Grant's recoil from Oxford had liberated the Rebel army previously confronting him; which had forthwith been apprised Dec. 21. of the cloud gathering on the Mississippi. Gen. Pemberton, who was in chief command at Grenada, had at once faced about; and, three days later, having definite advices that Sherman's gunboats had reached the mouth of the Yazoo, he began to send his men southward by rail; following himself next day. Thus, expeditious as were Sherman's moveaving been misdirected), also shared in the peril and glory of the assault. But what could valor — the valor of half-a-dozen regiments — avail against such impediments Pemberton had been reenforced, during the 27th, by three fresh brigades from Grenada; and more were constantly coming in. His rifle-pits were filled with sharpshooters, whose every bullet drew blood ; his gunners had the range of the ford, such as it was, and poured grape and canister into our dauntless but momently decimated he
Xxvii. Between Virginia and the Mississippi.—from Vicksburg to Abingdon Phillips's raid to Grenada McPherson advances from Vicksburg Forrest's raid to Jackson W. T. Sherman's advance to Meridian Sovy Smith's failure Osband's fight at Yazoo City Palmer's advance to Dalton Forrest takes Union City repulsed by HicJ. J. Phillips, 9th Illinois (infantry), Lt.-Col. W. R. M. Wallace, 4th Ill. cavalry, and Maj. D. E. Coon, 2d Iowa cavalry, raided through northern Mississippi to Grenada; where they captured and destroyed Aug. 16, 1863. over 50 locomotives and about 500 cars of all kinds. At 9 1/2 P. M., Col. Winslow arrived from Gen. Sherman'an's brigades of infantry, until, finally, McPherson found himself confronted by a superior force, comprising Loring's division and other forces hurried down from Grenada and up from points so distant as Mobile ; when he retreated without a battle, via Clinton, to Vicksburg. Oct. 21. Under cover of demonstrations at Colliers
red from him near Jefferson, Va., 395. Gregg, Brig.-Gen. (Rebel), wounded at Antietam, 210; at Gettysburg, 389. Grenada, Miss., cavalry raids to, 615. Grierson, Col. B. H. (since Gen.), raids from Lagrange to Baton Rouge, 301; raids toward M Front Roval,Va., 134. Gallatin, Tenn., 213. Glasgow, Mo., 560. Grand Gulf, Miss., 302. Greensburg. Ky., 687. Grenada, Miss., 615. Gum Swamp, N. C., 463. Harpeth River, Tenn., 787. Harrison, Mo., 557. Harrisonburg, Va., 137. Hartsville, Tavern, Va., 574. Zollicoffer, Tenn., 283. Mississippi, railroads broken in, 71-2; Rosecrans in, 75; cavalry raids to Grenada, 615; desultory expeditions between Virginia and the, 615; Sovy Smith's failure in, 617. Missouri, reoccupied by RebeMissouri, 557; of Kilpatrick and Dahlgren near Richmond, 5.5; of Wilson and Kautz to Burksville, 587; cavalry raid to Grenada, Miss., 615; Morgan's last into Kentucky, 623; of Stoneman to Macon, 633; Davidson's and Grierson's, 695-6; Dana's raid in N