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ngineer, William Dewey, were detained as prisoners, but the rest of the crew were given their liberty--New Orleans Delta, December 2. A skirmish occurred between a scouting-party from Captain Mear's Maryland Home Guard, stationed at Berlin, and a body of Bob White's rebel cavalry, in which the latter were put to flight with a loss of two men.-General Curtis, at St. Louis, Mo., reported to the War Department at Washington, that a cavalry expedition, under Major Torry, to the forks of the Mingo and St. Francis Rivers, had captured Colonel Phelan and ten men of the rebel army. The Savannah Republican says that the people of Charleston, S. C., have pulled up their lead pipes and contributed sixty thousand pounds to the government, and that the government will issue receipts for all lead pipes and other fixtures, and binds itself to replace them at the end of the war. --The column of the Union army under General Grant, passed through Holly springs, Miss., this morning--(Doc. 55.)
December 20. Holly Springs, Miss., was this day entered and sacked by the rebel army under General Van Dorn. An immense amount of public and private property was carried off or destroyed. The garrison surrendered after a very short resistance.--(Doc. 79.) A skirmish occurred near Halltown, Va., between a detachment of Union cavalry, under the command of Captain Vernon, and a body of rebel guerrillas. After a short fight the rebels were routed, leaving three of their number in the hands of the Unionists.--Frederick Examiner (Md.). Trenton and Humboldt, Tenn., were this day entered and captured by the rebel forces under General Forrest. They burned the depots, and all the Government stores they could not carry off.--(Doc. 80.) A train of wagons, twenty-seven in number, laden with provisions for the army of the Potomac, and a guard of one hundred and seventy men, were captured near Occoquan, Va., by a detachment of rebel cavalry under the command of General Wade
grant will be asked from you (the legislature) for the support of those who, with resignation, submit to the effects of a misfortune which it is not in our power to stop. Nevertheless, I have made the attempt to send beyond the Atlantic advices inspired by a sincere sympathy; but the great maritime Powers not having thought it advisable as yet to act in concert with me, I have been obliged to postpone to a more suitable opportunity the offer of mediation, the object of which was to stop the effusion of blood, and to prevent the exhaustion of a country the future of which cannot be looked upon with indifference. Holly Springs, Miss., was visited by a party of rebel guerrillas, who retired after committing various depredations on the property of the loyalists.--General Banks, at New Orleans, issued a general order, confirming General Butler's order of December ninth, 1862, assessing cotton factors and others who had subscribed to the secession fund, for the support of the poor.
December 5. Major-General R. C. Schenck relinquished the command of the Middle Department, and was succeeded by Brigadier-General Lockwood.--Stephen D. Lee, Major-General in the rebel service, sent the following report from his headquarters, at Holly Springs, Miss., to General Joseph E. Johnston: Chased enemy's cavalry, eight hundred strong, from Ripley into Pocahontas, on the first. The enemy concentrated at Pocahontas, and evacuated Salisbury on the second. Two miles of railroad destroyed at Salisbury. Forrest passed safely over. Routed and drove across into Wolf River, at Moscow, two regiments of the enemy's cavalry, killing, wounding, and drowning about one hundred and seventy-five, capturing forty prisoners, and forty horses, and killing about one hundred horses. A body of rebel cavalry, with a few pieces of artillery, crossed the Rapidan, and made a demonstration in front of the National lines. After a brief skirmish, it was discovered that the rebels wished to re
anter's stable, they thought, under the circumstances, they would be justified in making an exchange, which they accordingly proceeded to do. As they were taking the saddles from their own tired steeds and placing them on the backs of the wealthy guerrilla's horses, the proprietor discovered them, and at once objected. He was met with the reply that, as he was anxious the Yankees should be speedily overtaken, those after them should have good horses. All right, gentlemen, said the planter; I will keep your animals until you return. I suppose you'll be back in two or three days at the furthest. When you return you'll find they have been well cared for. The soldiers were sometimes asked where they got their blue coats. They always replied, if they were travelling under the name of Van Dorn's cavalry, that they toot them at Holly Springs of the Yankees. This always excited great laughter among the secessionists. The scouts, however, usually wore the regular secesh uniforms.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
s. 7. General Grant's headquarters. Taking 1600 men, Armstrong reached Holly Springs on the 26th of August, and having been reinforced there by 1100 men under Jst move in three days. Van Dorn replied that he would be ready to move from Holly Springs on the 12th, but wanted men, arms, and wagons. Upon Price's refusal to give, runs nearly south, passing by Bolivar and Grand Junction, Tennessee, and Holly Springs, Grenada, etc., to Jackson, Mississippi. All this region of west Tennesseen the knowledge of the following facts, taken from Van Dorn's report, dated Holly Springs, October 20th, 1862: Surveying the whole field of operations before me,inth and Jackson, and enables us to push them. Our advance will cover even Holly Springs, which would be ours when we want it. All that is needful is to continue pury and ill-supplied. Draw everything possible from Memphis to help move on Holly Springs, and let us concentrate. Appeal to the governors of the States to rush dow
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
g the Mobile and Ohio at Jackson, Tennessee, runs nearly south, passing by Bolivar and Grand Junction, Tennessee, and Holly Springs, Grenada, etc., to Jackson, Mississippi. All this region of west Tennessee and the adjoining counties of MississippiOctober 1st, how gratifying would have been the knowledge of the following facts, taken from Van Dorn's report, dated Holly Springs, October 20th, 1862: Surveying the whole field of operations before me, . . . the conclusion forced itself irresit you have with Hurlbut, will garrison Corinth and Jackson, and enables us to push them. Our advance will cover even Holly Springs, which would be ours when we want it. All that is needful is to continue pursuing and whip them. We have whipped, anthem while they are broken and hungry, weary and ill-supplied. Draw everything possible from Memphis to help move on Holly Springs, and let us concentrate. Appeal to the governors of the States to rush down some twenty or thirty new regiments to h
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
eral Smith. Correspondence between Generals Bragg and Smith resulted in an order, dated July 21st, transferring the entire Army of Mississippi to Chattanooga. To mislead the enemy and to prevent an advance upon Tupelo, Bragg had, on the 19th, sent Colonel Joseph Wheeler with a brigade of cavalry into west Tennessee, and Brigadier-General Frank C. Armstrong with a like force into north Alabama. Wheeler's operations in west Tennessee may be briefly summarized as a rapid march from Holly Springs, Mississippi, to Bolivar, Tennessee; an attack upon the outposts at that place; the destruction of bridges on the line of communications of the troops at Bolivar and Jackson; a number of slight affairs with the enemy's cavalry, and the burning of a quantity of cotton in transit to the North. One week was thus occupied behind the enemy's lines, the main object of the movement being to create the impression of a general advance. On July 31st Bragg and Kirby Smith met at Chattanooga, and a joi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
eld on the Mississippi. Leaving Grand Junction on the 4th of November Grant advanced toward Holly Springs, Van Dorn falling back before him. McClernand was at the same time concentrating at Memphis each Memphis until after Sherman with the advance of his troops had started. The capture of Holly Springs on the 20th of December broke up General Grant's cooperating movement by land. Sherman, kno and cooperate in the attack. Grant had advanced a part of his own immediate army as far as Holly Springs, where he established a great depot of supplies, and was about to move forward when Van Dorn, by a splendid dash upon Holly Springs, The post at Holly Springs was commanded by Colonel R. C. Murphy, 8th Wisconsin Volunteers, and the force there consisted of the 8th Wisconsin and a portionHolly Springs was commanded by Colonel R. C. Murphy, 8th Wisconsin Volunteers, and the force there consisted of the 8th Wisconsin and a portion of the 62d Illinois Infantry, and six companies of the 2d Illinois Cavalry. The surprise was made at daylight, and was complete, but many of the soldiers resisted capture. The cavalrymen distingui
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
is fortunate for us, probably, that General Grant was prevented from trying its strength. In conversing with the President concerning the operations impending, General Pemberton and I advocated opposite modes of warfare. On the 25th the President returned to Jackson, and on the 27th information was received from General W. W. Loring, commanding near Grenada, that General Grant's army, which had been advancing, was retiring in consequence of the destruction of the depot of supplies at Holly Springs by the gallant Van Dorn's daring and skillfully executed enterprise, surpassed by none of its character achieved during the war. This depot was to have supplied the Federal army in its march toward Vicksburg. Its destruction frustrated that design. General Van Dorn accomplished it on the 20th of December with a brigade of cavalry, attacking, defeating, and capturing a superior force. The supplies were destroyed by burning the store-houses — to which the consent of the owners was freel
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