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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 32 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 22 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 20 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 12 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
eneral Grant at Columbus, Kentucky, confirmation of my report of Price's movement to Ripley, adding that I should move Stanley's division to Rienzi, and thence to Kossuth, unless he had other views. Two days later I again telegraphed to General Grant that there were no signs of the enemy at Hatchie Crossing, and that my reason for proposing to put Stanley at or near Kossuth was that he would cover nearly all the Hatchie Crossing, as far as Pocahontas, except against heavy forces, and that Hamilton would then move at least one brigade, from Rienzi. I asked that a sharp lookout be kept in the direction of Bolivar. October 1st, I telegraphed General Grant th left of Davies's and in rear of the old Halleck line of batteries; and Stanley's division, 3500 strong, mainly in reserve on the extreme left, looking toward the Kossuth road. Thus in front of those wooded western approaches, the Union troops, on the morning of October 3d, waited for what might happen, wholly ignorant of what V
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
eneral Grant at Columbus, Kentucky, confirmation of my report of Price's movement to Ripley, adding that I should move Stanley's division to Rienzi, and thence to Kossuth, unless he had other views. Two days later I again telegraphed to General Grant that there were no signs of the enemy at Hatchie Crossing, and that my reason for proposing to put Stanley at or near Kossuth was that he would cover nearly all the Hatchie Crossing, as far as Pocahontas, except against heavy forces, and that Hamilton would then move at least one brigade, from Rienzi. I asked that a sharp lookout be kept in the direction of Bolivar. October 1st, I telegraphed General Grant th left of Davies's and in rear of the old Halleck line of batteries; and Stanley's division, 3500 strong, mainly in reserve on the extreme left, looking toward the Kossuth road. Thus in front of those wooded western approaches, the Union troops, on the morning of October 3d, waited for what might happen, wholly ignorant of what V
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
my's rear guard at a creek 5 miles out on the Kossuth road, but that road was so much obstructed bythe other leading direct from Corinth through Kossuth. Being now some 10 miles in advance of oue on short notice by the most direct route to Kossuth. When commencing this movement they will tho 2d. Bragg's corps via the Tennessee pike to Kossuth until it reaches the south side of the Tuscumidge's corps (or reserve) via the turnpike to Kossuth; thence to Blackland, Carrollsville, and Baldn. 4th. Polk's corps via the turnpike to Kossuth; thence by the Western road to Blackland, Cart the main body of the rebels is stationed at Kossuth, a few miles from Corinth, while some 25,000 nd Captain Elliott's and march immediately to Kossuth and to leave Lieutenant Prather and 10 men, adge is thoroughly burned, and then proceed to Kossuth, due south of Chewalla. A. J. Lindsay, Che colonel gone, I went to join my company at Kossuth, and then and there reported to Captain Falkn[1 more...]
nville, good. From Corinth to Jacinto, via Kossuth and Danville, good. From Rienzi to Ripley,3d. Corinth to Danville, via old turnpike to Kossuth; but about 2 miles from there turn down to Danville or keep on to Kossuth, then turn down to Danville. 4th. Or go on by said road to Ripley.will follow the best road in the direction of Kossuth via the Female College, and when about 2 or 3 Danville, and another will go on the road to Kossuth until it meets the one to Rienzi, thence on tville. The rest will continue on the road to Kossuth until it meets the road to Carrollville, whenve been at work on the two roads from this to Kossuth; but I have sent out two staff officers to exnicate with these Headquarters at Guntown via Kossuth. Wm. N. R. Beall, Brigadier-General, Comdg.th Colonel Clanton's regiment of cavalry near Kossuth, who continued in the rear throughout the mar threw 12 into the yard of Albert Jones, near Kossuth, and deposited the others with a planter name
ccompanying map. Hamilton on the right, Davidson the centre, McKean on the left, with an advance of three regiments of infantry and a section of artillery under Colonel Oliver on the Chewalla road, at or near Alexander's, beyond the rebel breastworks. The cavalry were disposed as follows: (See map accompanying Colonel Wiezner's report.) A battalion at Burnsville, one at Roney's Mill on the Jacinto and Corinth road. Colonel Lee, with the Seventh Kansas and a part of the Seventh Illinois at Kossuth and Boneyard, watching the rebels' right flank; Colonel Hatch and Captain Wilcox on the east and north fronts, covering and reconnoitring. The reasons for these dispositions flow obviously from the foregoing explanations of our ignorance of the north-westerly approach, and of the possibility that the rebels might threaten us on the Chewalla and attack us by the Smith's Bridge road on our left, or go round and try us with his main force on the Purdy, or even Pittsburgh Landing road. Th
ccompanying map. Hamilton on the right, Davidson the centre, McKean on the left, with an advance of three regiments of infantry and a section of artillery under Colonel Oliver on the Chewalla road, at or near Alexander's, beyond the rebel breastworks. The cavalry were disposed as follows: (See map accompanying Colonel Wiezner's report.) A battalion at Burnsville, one at Roney's Mill on the Jacinto and Corinth road. Colonel Lee, with the Seventh Kansas and a part of the Seventh Illinois at Kossuth and Boneyard, watching the rebels' right flank; Colonel Hatch and Captain Wilcox on the east and north fronts, covering and reconnoitring. The reasons for these dispositions flow obviously from the foregoing explanations of our ignorance of the north-westerly approach, and of the possibility that the rebels might threaten us on the Chewalla and attack us by the Smith's Bridge road on our left, or go round and try us with his main force on the Purdy, or even Pittsburgh Landing road. Th
will, until further orders, receive all of his orders from General Van Dorn. V. The commanding officer of the troops at Chewalla and Cypress will hold their commands in readiness to move on short notice, by the most direct route, to Kossuth. When commencing this movement, they will thoroughly destroy the Cypress bridge, and all the railroad and mud road bridges in their rear, and all bridges that might be of service to the enemy; they will take their artillery with them, and on reaching Kossuth, will follow up the general movement of the army and protect its rear. VI. The commanding officer of the cavalry at Pocahontas will hold his command in readiness to move on short notice to Ripley. On commencing the move, he will destroy all the railroad and mud road bridges in his rear, and all other bridges that may be of service to the enemy will be destroyed. He will take all of his artillery with him, and move from Ripley to Pontotoc, and will protect the rear of the forces moving
flanks. With eight companies I made a reconnoissance south of Corinth, engaged the enemy's cavalry and repulsed them in gallant style. Returning, I advanced the command to the fortifications on College Hill, where I engaged the enemy in force after the main body of our troops had withdrawn. I then withdrew my command without serious loss and brought up the rear of the army. I was then ordered to Rienzi, under General Armstrong; received orders countermanding that move on our arrival at Kossuth. The firing having commenced at Davis' bridge, near Pocahontas, we proceeeded with both commands to the Ripley and Pocahontas road; advanced up that road to within one mile and a half of Pocahontas, threatening the enemy's rear, engaging them in a brilliant skirmish, which was a move very favorable towards saving the train of wagons. I held that position all night with my brigade, and fell back before the enemy next day. From that time the brigade was engaged in bringing up the rear of
orce, after leaving a sufficient force at Rienzi and Jacinto, to prevent the surprise of Corinth from that direction. Major-General Ord was to move to Burnsville, and from there take roads north of the railroad, and attack from that side. General Ord having to leave from his two divisions, already very much reduced in numbers, from long-continued service and the number of battles they had been in, the garrison at Corinth; he also had one regiment of infantry and a squadron of cavalry at Kossuth, one regiment of infantry and one company of cavalry at Cheuvall, and one regiment of infantry that moved, under Colonel Mower, and joined General Rosecrans' command, reduced the number of men of his command available to the expedition, to about thirty thousand. I had previously ordered the infantry of General Ross' command at Bolivar to hold themselves in readiness to move at a moment's warning; had also directed the concentration of cars at Jackson to move these troops. Within twent
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kossuth, Lajos (Louis) 1802- (search)
o had assembled. A congressional banquet was given him at the National Hotel, at which W. R. King, president of the Senate, presided, Kossuth and Speaker Boyd being on his right hand, and Secretary Webster on his left. On that occasion Kossuth delivered one of his most effective speeches. Mr. Webster concluded his remarks with the following sentiment : Hungarian independence, Hungarian control of her own destinies, and Hungary as a distinct nationality among the nations of Europe. After Kossuth's departure there were debates in Congress on propositions for the United States to lend material aid to the people of Hungary, struggling for national independence; but the final determination was that the United States should not change its uniform policy of neutrality in favor of Hungary. The cordial reception of Kossuth everywhere, and the magnetic power of his eloquence over every audience, were gratifying and wonderful. A contemporary wrote: The circumstances attending the reception
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