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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Capture of Port Gibson-Grierson's raid-occupation of Grand Gulf-movement up the Big Black- battle of Raymond (search)
ld. The four regiments were to be taken from troops near the river so that there would be no delay. During the night of the 6th McPherson drew in his troops north of the Big Black and was off at an early hour on the road to Jackson, via Rocky Springs, Utica and Raymond. That night he and McClernand were both at Rocky Springs ten miles from Hankinson's ferry. McPherson remained there during the 8th, while McClernand moved to Big Sandy and Sherman marched from Grand Gulf to Hankinson's feRocky Springs ten miles from Hankinson's ferry. McPherson remained there during the 8th, while McClernand moved to Big Sandy and Sherman marched from Grand Gulf to Hankinson's ferry. The 8th [9th], McPherson moved to a point within a few miles west of Utica; McClernand and Sherman remained where they were. On the 10th McPherson moved to Utica, Sherman to Big Sandy; McClernand was still at Big Sandy. The 11th, McClernand was at Five Mile Creek; Sherman at Auburn; McPherson five miles advanced from Utica. May 12th, McClernand was at Fourteen Mile Creek; Sherman at Fourteen Mile Creek; McPherson at Raymond after a battle. After McPherson crossed the Big Black at H
d. While lying at Hawkinson's Ferry, waiting for wagons, supplies, and Sherman's corps, which had come forward in the mean time, demonstrations were made, successfully I believe, to induce the enemy to think that route and the one by Hall's Ferry above, were objects of much solicitude to me. Reconnoissances were made to the west side of the Big Black to within six miles of Warrenton. On the seventh of May an advance was ordered, McPherson's corps keeping the road nearest Black River to Rocky Springs, McClernand's corps keeping the ridge road from Willow Springs, and Sher. man following with his corps divided on the two roads. All the ferries were closely guarded until our troops were well advanced. It was my intention here to hug the Black River as closely as possible with McClernand's and Sherman's corps, and get them to the railroad, at some place between Edward's Station and Bolton. McPherson was to move by way of Utica to Raymond, and from thence into Jackson, destroying the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
eld. The four regiments were to be taken from troops near the river, so that there would be no delay. During the night of the 6th McPherson drew in his troops north of the Big Black and was off at an early hour on the road to Jackson, via Rocky Springs, Utica, and Raymond. That night he and McClernand were both at Rocky Springs, ten miles from Hankinson's Ferry. McPherson remained there during the 8th, while McClernand moved to Big Sandy and Sherman marched from Grand Gulf to Hankinson's Rocky Springs, ten miles from Hankinson's Ferry. McPherson remained there during the 8th, while McClernand moved to Big Sandy and Sherman marched from Grand Gulf to Hankinson's Ferry. The 8th McPherson moved to a point within a few miles of Utica; McClernand and Sherman remained where they were. On the 10th McPherson moved to Utica; Sherman to Big Sandy,--McClernand was still at Big Sandy. The 11th McClernand was at Five Mile Creek; Sherman at Auburn; McPherson five miles advanced from Utica. May 12th McClernand was at Fourteen Mile Creek; Sherman at Fourteen Mile Creek; McPherson at Raymond, after a battle. After McPherson crossed the Big Black at Hankinson'
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
before Major-General Loring could arrive from Jackson. At half-past 5 r. M., he informed me that he was falling back across the Bayou Pierre, and that he would endeavor to hold that position until the arrival of reinforcements. On reaching Rocky Springs, about eighteen miles from Grand Gulf, Major-General Loring, learning that Brigadier-General Bowen had fallen back before a large force, from Port Gibson, in the direction of Grand Gulf, directed two regiments and a field-battery of Tilghman'was promptly carried out. Previous to crossing the river, however, Colonel A. W. Reynolds's brigade, of Stevenson's division, had arrived. Not having heard from General Bowen after half-past 5 . M., on the 1st instant, I dispatched him, via Rocky Springs, on the morning of the 2d, as follows: If you are holding your position on the Bayou Pierre, and your communication is open by the Big Black to this place, continue to hold it. I am informed that you have fallen back to Grand Gulf; if this is
says: This had hardly been determined upon when your communication was received, stating that the army had fallen back towards Grand Gulf, and ordering it to move at once out of its position, and to cross the Big Black at Hankinson's Ferry. The movement was promptly carried out; previous to crossing the river, however, Colonel A. W. Reynolds' brigade, of Stevenson's division, had arrived. Not having heard from General Bowen after 5.30 P. M., on the first instant, I dispatched him, via Rocky Springs, on the morning of the second, as follows: If you are holding your position on the Bayou Pierre, and your communication is open by the Big Black to this place, continue to hold it. I am informed that you have fallen back to Grand Gulf; if this is so, carry out my instructions just sent in cipher. These instructions were, in case he had fallen back to Grand Gulf, which is a cul-de-sac, to destroy his heavy guns, and such stores as could not be transported, and endeavor to retire across t
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 13: Vicksburg campaign (search)
Ferry, he reported the position and movements of the various parts of the army, again alluded to the incompetency of McClernand, and indicated that as soon as Sherman's troops arrive the general advance would begin. On the 8th he wrote from Rocky Springs, giving the changes in the station of the troops, and making the statement that Colonel Prime, the chief engineer, had reported the final failure of the shorter road across the peninsula in front of Vicksburg. On the 10th he reported from RoRocky Springs that the forward movement was progressing favorably in the general direction of the Jackson & Vicksburg Railroad, that the army would rest that night at ten or twelve miles from the railroad, and that General Grant was advancing his headquarters to Auburn. It took just ten days for this message to reach Washington. During this period he wrote no despatches, because communication by the way of Grand Gulf had become too roundabout and dangerous, and the shorter route by Vicksburg ha
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Index (search)
, railroad station at, 294. Review, great, 341, 361, 362. Revolution, French, of 1848, 62, et seq. Reynolds, General, J. J., 269, 348. Richmond, 166, 256, 310, 318, 320, 326, 327, 329, 330, 332, 333, 353, 356, 357, 359, 363. Ringgold Station, 257. Ripley, George, 17, 26, 30, 31, 33, 34, 35-37, 39, 44, 45, 48, 49, 51, 153, 158, 176, 453, 454. Roberts, Marshall O., 401. Robeson, George M., 411, 424, 433. Robespierre, 68, 69. Robinson, General, 373. Rockville, 336. Rocky Springs, 221. Rodenbough, Captain, 352. Rolling Fork Bayou, 207. Roosevelt, President, 103. Rosecrans, General, 232-234, 236, 253-258, 260, 262-268, 271-278, 339. Rossville, 191. Rousseau, General, 270. Roxbury, 37. Russia, 82. Rust, Senator, 144, 145. S. Sackville-West, Sir Lionel, 475. Safe Burglary Conspiracy, 434,435, 441, 442, 493. St. Thomas Island, 402. Sale of arms to France, 425. Sallust, 56. Santo Domingo, 402, 419,420,422, 435. Satartia, trip to, 231
the 6th, Grant ordered McPherson: Move one of your divisions to Rocky Springs to-morrow, leaving the other to occupy from your present headqun in the advance, followed closely by Crocker. They marched to Rocky Springs, about ten miles distant, where they remained in camp till the 9th. On the 8th, Grant's headquarters were removed to Rocky Springs. After making his demonstration against Haine's bluff, Sherman had lestation, on Southern railroad. This estimate was incorrect. Rocky Springs is full twenty-five miles from Edward's station. All looks wellHankinson's ferry began, McPherson's corps had the left, on the Rocky Springs road, nearest Black river; McClernand kept to the right, and mog the ferries across the Big Black, against Pemberton. But, at Rocky Springs, Grant heard that the rebels were fortifying and concentrating er, the headquarters were removed to Cayuga, eight miles beyond Rocky Springs, and, in accordance with the plan already described, McPherson
occupying its former position on the Rappahannock, having recrossed the river without any loss in the movement. Not more than one-third of General Hooker's force was engaged. General Stoneman's operations have been a brilliant success. A part of his force advanced to within two miles of Richmond, and the enemy's communication has been cut in every direction. The Army of the Potomac will very soon resume offensive operations. General Grant to General Halleck.—(Cipher telegram) Rocky Springs, Miss., May 8, 1863. Our advance is fifteen miles from Edward's station, on Southern railroad. All looks well. Port Hudson is evidently evacuated, except by a small garrison and their heavy artillery. General Grant to General Halleck.—(Cipher telegram.) Cayuga, Miss., May 11, 1863. My forces will be this evening as far advanced towards Jackson as Fourteen-mile creek, the left near Black river, and extending in a line as nearly east and west as they can get without bringing on a b
5, 322, 324-326; insubordination of, 351; issues offensive orders, 362; com-plaints of Sherman and McPherson, 362; relieved entirely from command, 363; mischievous behavior and career, 363, 364. McPHERSON, General James B., at Fort Donelson, i., 39; at Shiloh, 81; at Corinth, 115-117; in command of Seventeenth corps, 161; at Lake Providence 167; at Yazoo pass, 171; movement below Vicksburg 198; crosses the Mississippi, 206; battle of Port Gibson, 208; pursuit of enemy, 210; advance to Rocky Springs, 227; battle of Raymond, 236; advance towards Jackson, 240, 243; at battle of Jackson, 244, 216, 247; at battle of Champion's hill, 260, 268 269; in command of department of Tennessee, II., 18; with Sherman in Georgia, 533-540; death of, 541. Meade General George G., in command of army of Potomac, II., 6; magnanimity of, 15; in the Wilderness, 100-120; at Spottsylvania, 139; Grant's opinion of 186; at Cold Harbor, 296; crossing James river, 351; in command before Petersburg, 363, 365;
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