Your search returned 56 results in 22 document sections:

1 2 3
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Capture of Port Gibson-Grierson's raid-occupation of Grand Gulf-movement up the Big Black- battle of Raymond (search)
with the road from Grand Gulf to Raymond and Jackson was reached, Logan with his division was turned to the left towards Grand Gulf. I went with him a short distance from this junction. McPherson had encountered the largest force yet met since the battle of Port Gibson and had a skirmish nearly approaching a battle; but the road Logan had taken enabled him to come up on the enemy's right flank, and they soon gave way. McPherson was ordered to hold Hankinson's ferry and the road back to Willow Springs with one division; McClernand, who was now in the rear, was to join in this as well as to guard the line back down the bayou. I did not want to take the chances of having an enemy lurking in our rear. On the way from the junction to Grand Gulf, where the road comes into the one from Vicksburg to the same place six or seven miles out, I learned that the last of the enemy had retreated past that place on their way to Vicksburg. I left Logan to make the proper disposition of his troop
he same river. Next day a naval force took possession of the place without resistance. On the same day Brigadier-General Lawler, having reported to me for duty under Major-General Grant's order, was assigned to the command of the Second brigade of General Carr's division. March from Port Gibson to Champion Hill. On the third, agreeably to your instructions, my corps, save Lawler's brigade, which was left behind temporarily to garrison Port Gibson, marched on the Raymond road to Willow Springs; on the sixth to Rocky Spring; on the eighth to Little Sand; and on the <*>inth to Big Sand. General Osterhaus led the advance from Little to Big Sand, and upon arriving at the latter creek, immediately threw a detachment of infantry, preceded by the Second Illinois cavalry, over it, toward Hall's Ferry, on Big Black. Finding a detachment of the enemy in front of the ferry, a company of cavalry, under Lieutenant Stickel, dashed forward and dispersed it before it had time to form, kil
lies, and Sherman's corps, which had come forward in the mean time, demonstrations were made, successfully I believe, to induce the enemy to think that route and the one by Hall's Ferry above, were objects of much solicitude to me. Reconnoissances were made to the west side of the Big Black to within six miles of Warrenton. On the seventh of May an advance was ordered, McPherson's corps keeping the road nearest Black River to Rocky Springs, McClernand's corps keeping the ridge road from Willow Springs, and Sher. man following with his corps divided on the two roads. All the ferries were closely guarded until our troops were well advanced. It was my intention here to hug the Black River as closely as possible with McClernand's and Sherman's corps, and get them to the railroad, at some place between Edward's Station and Bolton. McPherson was to move by way of Utica to Raymond, and from thence into Jackson, destroying the railroad, telegraph, public stores, etc., and push west to rej
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
r that object you should unite your whole force. And I telegraphed again next day: If Grant's army crosses, unite all your forces to beat it. Success will give you back what was abandoned to win it. In transmitting General Pemberton's call for reinforcements to the Secretary of War, I said: They cannot be sent from here without giving up Tennessee. On the 3d Bowen's troops abandoned Grand Gulf and returned to Vicksburg. On the same day the Seventeenth Corps joined the Thirteenth at Willow Springs, where the two waited for the Fifteenth, which came up on the 8th. The army then marched toward Raymond, the Seventeenth Corps leaving first, and the Fifteenth second. In the evening of May 9th I received, by telegraph, orders to proceed at once to Mississippi and take chief command of the forces there, and to arrange to take with me, for temporary service, or to have follow without delay, three thousand good troops. I replied instantly: Your dispatch of this morning received. I sh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
h the road from Grand Gulf to Raymond and Jackson was reached, Logan, with his division, was turned to the left toward Grand Gulf. I went with him a short distance from this junction. McPherson had encountered the largest force yet met since the battle of Port Gibson, and had a skirmish nearly approaching a battle; but the road Logan had taken enabled him to come up on the enemy's right flank, and they soon gave way. McPherson was ordered to hold Hankinson's Ferry, and the road back to Willow Springs, with one division; General McClernand who was now in Major-General Andrew J. Smith. From a photograph. the rear was to join in this, as well as to guard the line back down the bayou. I did not want to take the chances of having an enemy lurking in our rear. On the way from the junction to Grand Gulf, where the road comes into the one from Vicksburg to the same place, six or seven miles out, I learned that the last of the enemy had retreated past that place on their way to Vicksb
n, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 11 Manassas, Va., Aug. 30, 1862 15 Beaver Dam, Va., May 9, 1864 2 Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864 7 Brentsville, Va., Jan. 9, 1863 3 Yellow Tavern, Va., May 11, 1864 14 Picket, Va., Dec. 14, 1864 1 Fort Scott, Va., Jan. 12, 1863 1 Milford Station May 20, 1864 1 Dinwiddie, Va., March 30, 1865 3 Gettysburg, Pa., July 3, 1863 14 Hawes's Shop, Va., May 28, 1864 6 Five Forks, Va., April 1, 1865 8 Monterey Md. July 4, 1863 4 Old Church, Va., May 30, 1864 2 Willow Springs, D. T., Aug. 12, 1865 2 Hagerstown, Md,, July 6, 1863 2 Cold Harbor, Va., June 1-6, 1864 5 Place unknown 3 notes.--This regiment, with one exception, sustained the heaviest loss in action of any cavalry regiment in the war. It was organized at Detroit in August, 1861, and left the State on September 29, with 1,144 officers and men. It went into winter quarters at Frederick, Md., but in February, 1862, moved into Virginia, joining Banks's troops in their advance up the Shenandoah
own, for the bayou was too narrow to turn in, to one Colonel Berry's plantation, four miles only by a good wagon-road. Here, at about eleven o'clock in the morning, the troops were landed. The Fourth Wisconsin, Ninth Connecticut and four guns, after marching two miles, taking a branch road by Hamilton's plantation, which led to the rear of the reported rebel camp — some said five hundred, some nine hundred strong, pitched between the Port Gibson Railroad and the road from Grand Gulf to Willow Springs, and which branch road produced the only two roads — namely, the railroad and Willow Springs road leading from Grand Gulf to the interior — took the direct road which cuts the railroad about one mile in rear of Grand Gulf. One of the regiments, the Seventh Vermont, was to cooperate with the Fourth Wisconsin and Ninth Connecticut in the contemplated attack on the camp, and the other, Col. Dudley's, to be held in reserve at the fork of the two roads. The rebels, apprised of our coming, ha<
I am also indebted to the gallant Lieutenant William Hill, company B, Eighth Indiana, for acting as Aid temporarily. Our list of killed and wounded is attached and made a part of this report. I have the honor to be, Captain, with great respect, your obedient servant, William P. Benton, Brigadier-General Commanding First Brigade, Fourteenth Division, Thirteenth Army Corps. Official report of Colonel MacAULEYULEYuleyuley. headquarters Eleventh Indiana Zouaves, near Willow Springs, Mississippi, May 5. Captain Jos. H. Livesey, Assistant Adjutant-General, First Brigade, Twelfth Division, Thirteenth Army Corps: sir: The following report of the part taken by the Eleventh Indiana, in the battle of May first, near Port Gibson, is respectfully submitted: We arrived near the battle-field at six o'clock A. M., on that day, after marching all night, and, before having time to cook breakfast, were sent by General A. P. Hovey to the field to report to General G. F. McGinnis.
t, as a consequence of the victory at Port Gibson, the enemy spiked his guns at Grand Gulf, and evacuated that place, retiring upon Vicksburgh and Edwards's Station. The fall of Grand Gulf was solely the result of the victory achieved by the land forces at Port Gibson. The armament and public stores captured there, are but just trophies of that victory. Hastening to bridge the south branch of the Bayou Pierre, at Port Gibson, you crossed on the morning of the third, and pushed on to Willow Springs, Big Sandy, and the main crossing of Fourteen Mile Creek,four miles from Edwards's Station. A detachment of the enemy was immediately driven away from the crossing, and you advanced, passed over, and rested during the night of the twelfth within threat miles of the enemy, in large force at the Station. On the morning of the thirteenth, the objective point of the army's movements having been changed from Edwards's Station to Jackson, in pursuance of an order from the commander of the
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Mississippi, 1863 (search)
Cavalry. MISSOURI--10th Cavalry. Battery "H" 1st Light Arty. May 3: Skirmish, North Fork, Bayou PierrieILLINOIS--30th, 31st, 45th and 124th Infantry. INDIANA--23d Infantry. OHIO--4th Indpt. Cavalry Company, Union loss, 1 killed, 9 wounded. Total, 10. May 3: Skirmish, Ingraham's HeightsILLINOIS--31st and 45th Infantry. INDIANA--23d Infantry. May 3: Skirmish, Jones' Cross RoadsINDIANA--48th and 59th Infantry. MINNESOTA--4th Infantry. WISCONSIN--6th Battery Light Arty. May 3: Skirmish, Willow SpringsILLINOIS--2d Cavalry (Co. "C"). INDIANA--48th and 59th Infantry. MINNESOTA--4th Infantry. OHIO--4th Indpt. Cavalry Company. May 3: Action, Big Black RiverMISSOURI--Battery "M" 1st Light Arty.; 10th and 24th (Co. "F") Infantry. May 3-4: Skirmishes, Forty Hills and Hankinson's FerryILLINOIS--Battery "D" 1st Light Arty.; 30th Infantry, INDIANA--48th Infantry. MICHIGAN--Battery "H" 1st Light Arty. OHIO--3d Indpt. Battery Light Arty.; 20th, 68th and 78th Infantry. May 4: Skirmish, King's Cr
1 2 3