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Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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burned another. General Price's orders were that the army should march on an average fifteen miles a day, and the different columns should form a junction at Fredericktown at a given time. Shelby had the exposed side—that toward the interior of the State—and took the liberty of going as he pleased. He captured Patterson and forty of Leper's band of marauders without firing a gun. He also reached Fredericktown two days ahead of time, and, finding neither of the other columns there, took Mineral Point and tore up miles of railroad track between Potosi and Iron Mountain. When Fagan and Marmaduke reached Fredericktown Shelby was there, loaded with supplies, Price determined to assault the fort, though the opinions of his division commanders were opposed to it. Marmaduke's division was ordered up from the east of Fredericktown and he was ordered to attack the fort from Shepherd mountain, while Cabell attacked from the plain. Marmaduke was assured there was no ditch around the fort.
d's Point, Cape Girardeau and St. Louis, and eagerly importuning General Hardee to cooperate with them in their enterprises. Learning that the Federals had left Ironton for Greenville, Mo., General Hardee advanced to the latter place early in August, with 1,000 infantry and 250 cavalry and a battery of artillery, to meet them. They, learning of his approach, retired to Ironton. He planned an attack on Ironton, but Thompson failed to cooperate. About the 12th, Colonel Borland occupied Fredericktown. He was determined to hold his position in Missouri. Maj.-Gen. Leonidas Polk, commanding Department No. 2, and given charge of military operations in Arkansas and Missouri, August 2d, sustained Hardee in this determination for a time, and requested Pillow to abandon New Madrid and join Hardee in aggressive operations in Missouri. But on August 26th, Polk directed Hardee to retire to the river at Point Pleasant, and said he would advise abandoning the line altogether if it were not for
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
Fredericksburg, Va. 8, 1; 16, 1; 22, 5; 23, 3; 25, 4; 30, 3, 30, 4; 31, 4; 32, 2; 33, 1; 39, 2; 41, 1; 43, 7; 45, 1; 63, 7; 74, 1; 85, 1; 86, 13; 91, 1; 100, 1; 117, 1; 135, 6; 135-A; 137, C7; 171 Battles: Dec. 11-15, 1862 25, 4; 30, 3, 30, 4; 31, 4; 32, 2; 33, 1; 63, 7 May 3-4, 1863 41, 1 Expedition to vicinity of, Aug. 1-8, 1862 23, 3 Fredericksburg, Department of (C): Boundaries 163 Frederick's Hall Station, Va. 16, 1; 74, 1; 100, 1 Fredericktown, Mo. 47, 1; 117, 1; 135-A; 152, H10; 153, A8; 171 Freeman's Ford, Va. 21, 13; 22, 5, 22, 7; 23, 4, 23, 5; 87, 2 Freestone Point, Va. 8, 1 Fremont's Orchard, Colo. Ter. 119, 1 Friar's Island, Tenn. 49, 1, 49, 2; 97, 1 Friar's Point, Miss. 135-A; 154, D8 Frick's Gap, Ga. 24, 3; 97, 1; 149, D10 Friendship Church, Tenn. 34, 3 Frog Bayou, Ark. 160, G11, 160, H11 Front Royal, Va. 5, 5; 21, 13; 22, 5; 27, 1; 43, 7; 69, 1; 74, 1; 81, 4; 82, 4,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
o his home at Culpeper or to Richmond, and I was ordered to report to Major-General Hill for duty, while one of the regimental commissaries was ordered to report to General Branch in my stead. Out of this movement against the enemy the Second Manassas and Maryland campaign developed in rapid succession, and I found myself loaded with the responsibility of providing for a family of about fifteen thousand, and daily widening the distance between us and our base of supplies. It was near Fredericktown that another ocurrence of misidentity led to the discomfiture of the misidentifier. We were breaking camp at early dawn—in fact, before dawn. Our wagons, with the headquarter wagon driver by a noble son of the Emerald Isle, were to take the lead on the road. The General was in his ambulance, probably intending to take his saddle at daylight. The ambulance driver wanted to pass the headquarter wagon, and the Irish driver of the wagon, being a little contrary, would not move out of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Events leading up to the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
his side of the mountains to-morrow night, cross at Shepherdstown next day, and move over to Fredericktown. You will, however, be able to judge whether you can pass around their army without hindran (the 24th), this side of the mountain, cross the Potomac at Shepherdstown, and move towards Fredericktown the next day. It also leaves Stuart to decide whether he can move around the Federal army Potomac, and that on the day before (June 27th) his army was at Poolesville, moving towards Fredericktown. General Stuart appears to have thought that his movement was intended to threaten Washinwho had just been brought to him. He told me that this scout had left the neighborhood of Fredericktown that morning, and had brought information that the Federal army had crossed the Potomac, and that its advance had reached Fredericktown, and was moving thence westward towards the mountains. The scout informed General Lee that General Meade was then in command of the army, and also as to t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
ongstreet and go to Ewell. Lee's final instruction. But General Lee's final instructions to Stuart, dated June 23d, 5 P. M., shows what choice of routes was given to Stuart. General Lee says:If General Hooker's army remains inactive, you can leave two brigades to watch him, and withdraw with the three others; but should he not appear to be moving northward, I think you had better withdraw this side of the mountain to-morrow night, cross at Shepherdstown next day, and move over to Fredericktown. You will, however, be able to judge whether you can pass around their army without hindrance, doing them all the damage you can, and cross the river east of the mountains. In either case, after crossing the river, you must move on, and feel the right of Ewell's troops, collecting information, provisions, &c. * * * * The movements of Ewell's Corps are as stated in my former letter. Hill's first division will reach the Potomac to-day (23d), and Longstreet will follow to-morow. This le
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The correspondence of Gen. Robt. E. Lee. (search)
to General J. E. B. Stuart, June 22, 1863, page 913.Move with three Brigades into Maryland. (Two Brigades can guard the Blue Ridge and take care of your rear.) Take position on General Ewell's right. Place yourself in communication with him. One column will move by the Emmettsburg route, another by Chambersburg. General Lee to General Stuart, June 23, 1863.I think you had better withdraw on this side of the mountain to-morrow night, cross at Shepardstown the next day and move over to Fredericktown. In either case, after crossing the river you must move on and feel the right of Ewell's troops, collecting information, provisions, &c. General Lee to Davis, June 23, 1863, page 925.Urges withdrawal of troops from Carolina and Georgia under Beauregard and part at least pushed forward to Culpeper C. H. His presence would give magnitude to even a small demonstration and tend greatly to confound and perplex the enemy. Good results would follow from sending forward under General Beaurega
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stuart's cavalry in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
k you had better withdraw this side of the mountain tomorrow night, cross at Shepherdstown next day, and move over to Fredericktown. You will, however, be able to judge whether you can pass around their army without hindrance, doing them all the In his last order General Lee suggested that he cross the Potomac west of the Blue Ridge mountains and move over to Fredericktown, which would place him on the right of Ewell; but discretion was allowed Stuart to cross east of the mountains if he at Seneca on the 25th, as he expected to do before Hooker's army moved, he might still have had time to move over to Fredericktown, as indicated by General Lee; but when he had crossed the Potomac on the 27th, it was too late to go to FredericktownFredericktown, and Ewell's movement had so far progressed that it was too late for Stuart to join him en route to the Susquehanna. The only thing that was then left for him to do was to go on to Dover, where he had reason to believe he would find Ewell's corps.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
d discretionary powers; whereupon I withdrew. The correspondence between Lee and Stuart is not complete without adding an extract from a letter, dated 23d June, in which General Lee says: * * * If General Hooker's army remains inactive, you can leave two brigades to watch him, and withdraw with the three others, but should he appear to be moving northward, I think you had better withdraw this side of the mountain tomorrow night, cross at Shepherdstown the next day, and move over to Fredericktown. You will, however, be able to judge whether you can pass around their wing without hindrance, doing them all the damage you can, and cross the river east of the mountains. In either case, after crossing the river, you must move on and feel the right of Ewell's troops, * * * but I think the sooner you cross into Maryland after tomorrow, the better. In view of these letters, it seems reasonably plain that while General Lee's first purpose, communicated to Stuart the same day he gave
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
ral Stuart dated June 23, a part of which I ,will quote: headquarters, army of Northern Virginia, June 23, 1863, 3:30 P. M. Major-General J. E. B. Stuart, Commanding Cavalry: General, * * * If General Hooker's army remains inactive you can leave two brigades to watch him, and withdraw with the three others, but should he not appear to be moving northward, I think you had better withdraw this side of the mountain to-morrow night, cross at Shepherdstown next day, and move over to Fredericktown. You will, however, be able to judge whether you can pass around their army without hindrance, doing them all the damage you can, and cross the river east of the mountains. In either case, after crossing the river, you must move on and feel the right of Ewell's troops, collecting information, provisions, etc. Give instructions to the commander of the brigades left behind to watch the flank and rear of the army, and (in the event of the enemy leaving their front) retire from the mo
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