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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 2 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 8: the siege and capture of Fort Donelson. (search)
winding and picturesque river, whose bosom and shores have been made historical by great events. At about two o'clock in the afternoon we passed the ruins of the Cumberland Iron Works, and at three o'clock we landed at the site of Dover. The little village, with its church, court-house, and almost one hundred dwellings and stores, when Fort Donelson This fort was so named in honor of Andrew Jackson Donelson, the adopted son of President Jackson, and who at that time was occupying the Hermitage, a few miles from Nashville. He warmly espoused the cause of the conspirators. was built, had disappeared. The public buildings and most of the private ones had been laid in ashes during the war, and only a few dilapidated structures remained. At Cooley's tavern, near the landing-place (in which General Tilghman had quartered), the writer was introduced to Captain James P. Flood, the commander of the famous Flood's Second Illinois Battery, who performed gallant service at Dover, in re
esult, unless, by a treaty with Mexico, the South can add more weight to her end of the lever. Let the South stop at the Sabine, while the North may spread unchecked beyond the Rocky Mountains, and the Southern scale must kick the beam. The letter of Mr. Gilmer, when printed, was, by Mr. Aaron V. Brown, a Democratic member of Congress from Tennessee, inclosed in a letter to Gen. Jackson, asking the General's opinion thereon. That request promptly elicited the following response: Hermitage, February 13, 1843. May dear Sir:--Yours of the 23d ultimo has been received, and with it The Madisonian, containing Gov. Gilmer's letter on the subject of the annexation of Texas to the United States. You are not mistaken in supposing that I have formed an opinion on this interesting subject. It occupied much of my time during my Presidency, and, I am sure, has lost none of its importance by what has since transpired. Soon after my election in 1829, it was made known to me by Mr
ought like divils, an' died in a hape; An‘ since our last march, as we wint through Kintucky, How many brave fellows have laid down to slape!” “No longer a sojer, dear Kitty, I'll tarry-- Faith, while I wor one, to the cause I wor thrue; An‘ now I've come home, love, a swate girl to marry.” “Pray, Larry, who is she?” “Arrah! Kitty, 'tis you! I've got me discharge, an' through life's wintry weather We'll make the path aisy, as aisy can be.” “Me heart's in me hand.” “I'll take them together.” “Presint arms, then, darlint!” “I will, love,” says she. “Ah! Larry, I'm glad — are you tired of fightina?” And sweet Kitty smiled — looked him full in the eyes. “Oh! no, Kitty, dear, for I took a delight in Performina me dooty, wherever it lies; May me hand lave me body, whin I pull the thrigger In battle again.” “Why, Larry?” “Because The goddess of Liberty's turned to a nigger, An‘ ould Father Abram's forgotten the laws!” Hermitage
Morgan's Ferry, on the Atchafalaya, on the eleventh. I was detained there one day, in making preparations to cross the river, the entire command, owing to conflicting orders, not arriving until the fourteenth, and on the fifteenth I moved for Hermitage; arrived within five miles the same night, found the bridge burned across Bayou Seria, halted until daylight, then moved on Waterloo, four miles above Hermitage. The enemy were reinforced from Banks' army at Port Hudson. I made demonstrationsHermitage. The enemy were reinforced from Banks' army at Port Hudson. I made demonstrations of an attack during the day; at night drove in the enemy's pickets, and, under cover of darkness, withdrew my force, leaving a strong picket force in the rear, and moved for Grosse Tete. On the seventeenth, went down Grosse Tete to Rosedale; fed horses and men. At dark started for Indian village; arrived at two A. M., on eighteenth. Crossed Phillips' regiment, who made a dash into Plaquemine, taking eightyseven prisoners, burning three fine steamers, two steam flats, one hundred bales of c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Correspondence of Governor Campbell of Tennessee-original letters. from a committee of citizens. (search)
defference, and by those who are best taught, to appreciate your exalted capabilities and past public services. May we be permitted to request an answer to this note, and to assure you with how much cordiality we unite in the sentiment with the committee of arrangement, whose feelings and opinions we have on this occasion the honor to represent. We are, most respectfully, Josiah Nichol, Chairman of the Committee. J. Overton, Secretary of the Committee. From Andrew Jackson. Hermitage, February 14, 1828. My Dear Sir,--I have just received the letter you had the goodness to write me by Mr. Donelson on the 12th instant, with enclosures, for which I thank you. The reply you have made Mr. M. is such as I approve, and which I would, had I been present, requested you to have made. Indeed, under existing circumstances, delicacy and propriety would admit of no other. My real friends want no information from me on the subject of internal improvements and manufactories bu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hermitage, the. (search)
Hermitage, the. See Jackson, Andrew.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lafayette, Marie Jean Paul Roch Yves Gilbert Motier, Marquis de 1757- (search)
afayette at the Hermitage. the tomb (the old one, on the brow of the hill), where Custis presented the marquis with a ring containing a lock of Washington's hair. He received it with emotion. The door of the vault was opened, and there were displayed the leaden caskets which contained the coffins of Washington and his wife, decorated with flowers. Lafayette entered, kissed the casket, and reverently retired. Lafayette spent fourteen months in America. He visited Andrew Jackson at the Hermitage, and on his return to Washington his sixty-eighth birthday was celebrated at the White House. He sailed for Europe Sept. 7, 1825, in the frigate Brandywine. During the revolution of 1830, that drove Charles X. from the throne, Lafayette was made commander-in-chief of the National Guard. He sacrificed his own republican preferences for the sake of peace and order, and placed Louis Philippe on the throne. He died the acknowledged chief of the constitutional party on the continent of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tilghman, Matthew 1718-1790 (search)
Tilghman, Matthew 1718-1790 Patriot; born in Hermitage, Md., Feb. 17, 1718; member of the General Assembly of Maryland in 1751-77; served on the committee to protest to the King against the Stamp Act. He was president of the Revolutionary Convention which managed the province in 1774-77; was called from his seat in Congress in June, 1776, to become president of the convention which drew up the first constitution of Maryland; and was elected to the Maryland Senate in 1777 and 1781. He died Patriot; born in Hermitage, Md., Feb. 17, 1718; member of the General Assembly of Maryland in 1751-77; served on the committee to protest to the King against the Stamp Act. He was president of the Revolutionary Convention which managed the province in 1774-77; was called from his seat in Congress in June, 1776, to become president of the convention which drew up the first constitution of Maryland; and was elected to the Maryland Senate in 1777 and 1781. He died in Hermitage, Md., May 4, 1790.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Missouri, 1864 (search)
aMISSOURI--8th State Militia Cavalry. Oct. 31: Skirmish, Big BlueMISSOURI--16th Cavalry. Nov. 1: Skirmish, RollaMISSOURI--10th Cavalry. Nov. 1: Skirmish, Lone JackMISSOURI--21st Infantry. Nov. 1: Skirmish, Big Piney, near WaynesvilleMISSOURI--34th Enrolled Militia (Detachment). Nov. 1: Skirmish near LebanonMISSOURI--Provisional Company Enrolled Militia. Nov. 1: Affair, GreentonINDIANA--89th Infantry. Nov. 1: Skirmish near QuincyMISSOURI--8th State Militia Cavalry. Nov. 2: Skirmish, HermitageMISSOURI--State Militia. Union loss, 5 killed, 1 wounded. Total, 6. Nov. 3: Skirmish, Vera Cruz(No Reports.) Nov. 5: Skirmish, Charleston  Nov. 5-6: Operations in Mississippi CountyMISSOURI--2d State Militia Cavalry (Detachment). Nov. 5-9: Exp. from Rolla to LickingMISSOURI--44th Infantry. Nov. 5-16: Exp. from Springfield to Fort Smith, Ark.ARKANSAS--2d Cavalry (Detachment). MISSOURI--8th State Militia Cavalry (Detachment). Nov. 6: Skirmish, SikestownMISSOURI--2d State Militia Cavalry
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Missouri Volunteers. (search)
eptember 22 (Detachment). Moreau Botttom, Jefferson City, October 7. Little Blue October 21. Independence October 22. Big Blue, State Line, October 22. Westport October 23. Engagement on the Marmiton or battle of Charlot October 25. Mine Creek, Little Osage River, Marias des Cygnes, October 25. Newtonia October 28. Expedition to Quincy October 29-November 8. Cane Creek October 29-30. Newtonia October 30. Quincy November 1. Near Quincy November 1-2. Hermitage November 2. Expedition from Springfield to Fort Smith, Ark., November 5-16 (Detachment). Cane Hill November 6. Duty at Lebanon, Neosho and Springfield till July, 1865. Mustered out July 17, 1865. Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 77 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 131 Enlisted men by disease. Total 212. 9th Missouri Regiment Cavalry Organized originally as Bowen's Cavalry Battalion, which was designated 9th Cavalry October, 1862, b
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