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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 2 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Hermitage (Missouri, United States) or search for Hermitage (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

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h, after some delay from a misunderstanding of orders, Early marched for Waynesboro, the enemy having gone thither by way of Staunton. The trains crossed South river at Patterson's ford and went up the east side of that stream, with Ramseur in front, followed by Gordon. Pegram marched on the right flank by the Waynesboro road, from Mt. Meridian, turning by the Dogtown road, five miles from Waynesboro. Early, with Kershaw's division, followed by Gordon, marched by the way of New Hope and Hermitage, striking the outpost of the Federal cavalry at the latter place and driving it in toward Dogtown. Pegram also encountered the enemy, about four miles from Dogtown, and drove them to that place, then formed a line, after dark, and pursued them to the Waynesboro and Staunton road and toward Fishersville, the Confederate cavalry having previously gone, by a byroad, to near the tunnel of the Virginia Central railroad through the Blue ridge, which the Federal cavalry was seeking to destroy, a