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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 2 0 Browse Search
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ities, leaving the country occupied by rebels. The number of British troops under Sir John Colbourne was only 20,000, while the rebels are said to have had 14,000 at Montreal, 4,000 at Napiersville, and thousands more in arms in different parts of the Canadas, fierce with indignation at the murder of a party of patriots by Indians in the employ of the British government. In November ‘37 two battles were fought between the British and the rebels, the one at St. Dennis, and the other at St. Charles, which was taken from a force of 3,000 Canadians, of whom 200 were killed, and 30 wounded. In December, Mackenzie, the head rebel, who seems to have been the prototype of Davis, organized a provisional government and assuming the right to dispose of ten millions of acres of land fair and fertile, took possession of Montgomery House, near Toronto, with a band of insurgents, and sent a demand to Sir Francis B. Head to dissolve the provincial parliament and to leave Toronto within fifteen
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Connecticut Volunteers. (search)
e 24. Arrived at Vicksburg June 25. Fatigue duty on Vicksburg Canal till July 23. Moved to Baton Rouge July 23-26, and duty there till August 21. Battle of Baton Rouge August 5. Moved to Carrollton August 21-22. Expedition to St. Charles September 7-8. Near St. Charles Court House September 8. Duty in the defenses of New Orleans till April, 1864, at New Orleans, Algiers, Mexican Gulf R. R. and mouth of the Mississippi and at Pass Manchac, Bonnet Carre, St. John Baptist January 11, thence to Berwick Bay. Provost duty at Brashear City till February 9. Duty along Opelousas R. R. from Berwick Bay to Jefferson, Headquarters at La Fourche, till June, at following points: Company D at Jefferson, Company G at St. Charles, Company F at Boutte Station, Company C at Bayou des Allemands, Company H at Raceland, Company B at La Fourche till April 1, then at Napoleonville, Terre Bonne; Company K at Tigersville, Company A at Bayou Boeuf till March 1, thence moved to B
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
t.) Attached to Dept. of Missouri. Moved to St. Charles, Mo., thence to Jefferson City, Mexico, Hannibal an 1861. Moved to Alton, Ill., July 6, thence to St. Charles and Mexico, Mo., and duty in Northern Missouri tiri to September, 1865. Service. Moved to St. Charles, Mo., thence to Hannibal, Jefferson Barracks and Roand duty there till July 15, 1861. Moved to St. Charles, Mo., thence to Hannibal, Jefferson Barracks and Ro Moved to Alton, Ill., June 17, 1861, thence to St. Charles and Warrenton, Mo., July 27. Moved to Bird's P Moved to Alton, Ill., July 10, 1861, thence to St. Charles and Mexico, Mo. Moved to Ironton, Mo., July 28ces. At Morganza, La., till July 12. Moved to St. Charles on White River, Ark., July 12 and duty there tillber 13, 1861, to February 3, 1862. March to St. Charles, Mo., thence moved to Fort Holt, Ky., February 3-20 duty there till January, 1865. 3 Companies at St. Charles. Moved to Helena, Ark., and duty there till Ju
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
dition December 20, 1862, to January 3, 1863. Chickasaw Bayou and Bluff December 26-29. Expedition to Arkansas Post, Ark., January 3-10, 1863. Capture of Fort Hindman, Arkansas Post, January 10-11. Reconnoissance to White River and St. Charles January 13, 1863. Moved to Young's Point, La., January 17. Duty there and at Milliken's Bend till April. Movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30. Battle of Port Gibson May 1. Battle of Champion's Hill May 16. 15-April 8. Expedition to Fort Pillow, Tenn., April 13-17. Operations against Fort Pillow April 17-June 5. Capture of Fort Pillow June 5. Occupation of Memphis, Tenn., June 6. Expedition up White River, Ark., June 10-July 14. St. Charles June 17. Grand Prairie July 6-7. Duvall's Bluff July 7. Duty at Helena, Ark., till April, 1863. Expedition to Arkansas Post November 16-22, 1862. Expedition to Yazoo Pass by Moon Lake, Yazoo Pass and Coldwater and Tallahatchie R
ne 27. Bayou Cache July 6 (Co. I ). Hill's Plantation, Cache River, July 7. March to Helena July 11-14. Duty there and scouting from White River to the St. Francis till June, 1863. Expedition from Clarendon to Lawrenceville and St. Charles September 11-13, 1862. LaGrange September 11. Marianna and LaGrange November 8. Expedition to Arkansas Post November 16-21. Expedition to Grenada, Miss., November 27-December 5. Oakland, Miss., December 3. Expedition up St. Fl June. Moved to New Orleans, La., and provost duty at Algiers, Carrollton and Thibodeaux till July 26. Moved to Morganza July 26, and duty there till September 3. Moved to mouth of White River, Ark., September 3. Duty there and at St. Charles and Duvall's Bluff till December. At Memphis, Tenn., till January, 1865. Ordered to New Orleans, La., January 1, thence to Kennersville Station, and duty there till February 5. Moved to Dauphin Island. Ala., February 5. Campaign ag
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Massachusetts Volunteers. (search)
il 1-May 22. (1 Section stationed at Pineville April 29 to May 11.) Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Mansura May 16. At Morganza till July 13. Expedition to Atchafalaya River May 30-June 6. Moved to White River, Ark.; thence to St. Charles July 13-23. Moved to Morganza August 6-13. Expedition to White River and St. Charles September 3-11. Duty there till October 23. Moved to Duvall's Bluff October 23-24 and duty there till January 10, 1865. Moved to Kennersville, St. Charles September 3-11. Duty there till October 23. Moved to Duvall's Bluff October 23-24 and duty there till January 10, 1865. Moved to Kennersville, La., January 10-15; thence to Dauphin Island, Ala., February 9-11. Campaign against Mobile and its Defenses March 17-April 12. Siege of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely March 26-April 9. Storming of Fort Blakely April 9. Moved from Mobile to Selma, Ala., April 20-27; thence to Montgomery April 27-30. Moved to Mobile May 9-16 and duty there till June 30. Moved to Galveston, Texas, June 30-July 3, thence to Houston July 9, and duty there till October. Moved to Boston, Mass., via
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Missouri Volunteers. (search)
n State Militia Cavalry. (Krekel's Battalion) Organized at St. Charles, Mo., March 26, 1862. Attached to District of Central Missouri, Dept. of Missouri. Duty at St. Charles and in District of Central Missouri operating against guerrillas till November, 1862. Skirmish a. B ). Expedition from Clarendon, Ark., to Lawrenceville and St. Charles September 11-13. Occupation of Newtonia, Mo., October 4 (2nd 27-29 (2nd Battalion). Reconnoissance toward White River and St. Charles January 13, 1863 (Squadron). Carthage January 23, 1863. Ex Joseph to Hannibal and on North Missouri Railroad from Macon to St. Charles protecting roads and operating against guerrillas till March, 18el's Independent Company Reserve Corps Infantry. Organized at St. Charles August, 1861. Guard rail-road and duty at St. Charles till JaSt. Charles till January, 1862. Mustered out January 10, 1862. Nagle's Independent Company Reserve Corps Infantry. Organized at St. Louis, Mo., June 6,
, October 28, 1861. March to Syracuse, Mo., November 22, thence to Tipton, Mo., November, 29, and duty there till December 15. Moved to Otterville, Mo., December 15, and duty there till February 2, 1862. March to Booneville, thence to St. Charles, February 2-17. Siege of New Madrid, Mo., March 3-14. Siege and capture of Island No.10, Mississippi River, March 15-April 8. Expedition to Fort Pillow, Tenn., April 13-17. Moved to Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., April 17-23. Advancescaped formed into a Battalion of three Companies and marched to Alexandria. Retreat from Alexandria to Morganza May 13-20. Mansura or Marksville Prairie May 16. Duty at Morganza till September. Expedition to mouth of White River and St. Charles September 13-20. Expedition to Duvall's Bluff, Ark., October 21-27. Consolidated with 114th Ohio Infantry November 25, 1864. Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 17 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 6 Officers and 27
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 1: Louisiana. (search)
Chapter 1: Louisiana. St. Charles! Eighteen miles from New Orleans. Another hour! We try to catch the landscape as the pools and marshes, cedars and palmettoes slip behind us; but we try in vain to fix our minds on trifles by the way. A grove of orange trees, the fruit all burning ripe, arrests attention and provokes a cry of rapture; yet the coolest brain among us frets and flutters, for we know that we are driving towards a scene of strife, on which the eyes and hearts of forty millions of people are fixed in passionate hope and dread. President Grant affirms that anarchy reigns in Louisiana. No one doubts the fact; but General McEnery and the White citizens assert that this reign of anarchy was introduced by Grant, and is maintained in New Orleans for purposes of his own. This reign began, they say, two years ago, on the receipt by Stephen B. Packard of a telegram in these words : Washington, Department of Justice, Dec. 3, 1872. You are to enforce the decrees o
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 5: the State House. (search)
deserted corner of the town, from which the tides of life and trade have long since ebbed away. The stench reminds you of Dieppe, the dominoes and billiards of Bayonne. Yet this French quarter used to be a fashionable lounge, where ladies flirted, duellists fought, and senators ruled. The Rue St. Louis was an afternoon drive for belles and beaux, where sparkling Creoles ruined their admirers with a smile; but since that period fashions have changed, and everyone now lodges at the Hotel St. Charles. The once fashionable hotel has sunk into a State capital; one wing of the old hostelry being turned into an executive office, and a deserted dining-room into a legislative hall. By Kellogg's orders, planks are nailed across the doors and windows, and secured by iron stanchions. Barricades are thrown across St Louis Street, and the main entrance of the hotel is closed. One door — a back door in Royal Street — is left open. Inside and out the State House is strengthened to resist a
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