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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 47 5 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 10 2 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 10 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 22, 1861.., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for St. Charles, Mo. (Missouri, United States) or search for St. Charles, Mo. (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

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ord. The Mayor declared that he had never witnessed a more quiet and gentlemanly mob! Mr. Lovejoy preached at St. Charles, Missouri, the home of his wife's relatives, a few days after--October 1st--and was mobbed at the house of his mother-in-laback to Alton next day. Nearly the first person they met there was one of those who had first broken into the house at St. Charles; and the hunted clergyman had the cold comfort of hearing, from many of his religious brethren, that he had no one to all I go? I have been made to feel that, if I am not safe at Alton, I shall not be safe anywhere. I recently visited St. Charles to bring home my family, and was torn from their frantic embrace by a mob. I have been beset night and day at Alton. Expecting an assault, his wife in very delicate health, and in a state of nervous alarm from her recent experience at St. Charles, Mr. Lovejoy had arranged with a brother that they should watch alternate nights at home and at the store. At three i
did North Carolina or Arkansas. Her slaveholders, though not numerous, constituted her political and social aristocracy. They were large landholders, mainly settled in the fertile counties Of the 114,965 slaves held in 1860 in the entire State, no less than 50,280 were held in twelve Counties stretching along the Missouri river: viz: Boone, 5,034; Callaway, 4,527; Chariton, 2,837; Clay, 3,456; Cooper, 3,800; Howard, 5,889; Jackson, 3,944; Lafayette, 6,367; Pike, 4,056; Platte, 3,313; St. Charles, 2,181; Saline, 4,876. Probably two-thirds of all the slaves in the State were held within 20 miles of that river. stretched along both banks of the Missouri river, through the heart of the State, and exerting a potent control over the poorer, less intelligent, and less influential pioneers, who thinly overspread the rural counties north and south of them. The mercantile aristocracy of St. Louis was predominantly devoted to their supposed interests and docile to their commands. But for
rts occupied by State troops, 409; 410; sends Commissioners to Washington, 411; Col. Hayne sent, 412. See Charleston, Fort Sumter, etc. Spain, her traffic in slaves, 27-8; 54; the Holy Alliance, 266. See Cuba, Ostend, etc. Sprague, Gov. Wm., of R. I., 326; 469; 552. Squatter Sovereign, The, citation from, 237. Stanton, Frederick P., Sec'y of Kansas, 249. Staunton Spectator, The, 478. Star of the West, The, attempts to relieve Sumter, 412; seized at Indianola, 413. St. Charles, Mo., Lovejoy mobbed at, 137. Steadman, Capt., of S. C., Port Royal, 605. Steedman, Col., crosses into Virginia, 521. Stein, Gen-., one of Jackson's Brigadiers, 574. Stephens, Alex. H., 191; 233; opposes the Nebraska bill, 234; Union Speech before the Legislature, 342 to 344; votes against Secession, 347; elected Vice-President of the Confederacy, 415; speech at Savannah, 416 to 418; view of the Confederacy, 438; 477. Stephens, James. vote on Mo. Compromise, 801. Stevens,